125

I was wondering how to convert a decimal into a fraction in its lowest form in Python.

For example:

0.25  -> 1/4
0.5   -> 1/2
1.25  -> 5/4
3     -> 3/1
1
  • Convert 0.25 to 25/100, then figure out largest common factor? Commented Apr 28, 2014 at 14:49

6 Answers 6

212

You have two options:

  1. Use float.as_integer_ratio():

    >>> (0.25).as_integer_ratio()
    (1, 4)
    

    (as of Python 3.6, you can do the same with a decimal.Decimal() object.)

  2. Use the fractions.Fraction() type:

    >>> from fractions import Fraction
    >>> Fraction(0.25)
    Fraction(1, 4)
    

The latter has a very helpful str() conversion:

>>> str(Fraction(0.25))
'1/4'
>>> print Fraction(0.25)
1/4

Because floating point values can be imprecise, you can end up with 'weird' fractions; limit the denominator to 'simplify' the fraction somewhat, with Fraction.limit_denominator():

>>> Fraction(0.185)
Fraction(3332663724254167, 18014398509481984)
>>> Fraction(0.185).limit_denominator()
Fraction(37, 200)

If you are using Python 2.6 still, then Fraction() doesn't yet support passing in a float directly, but you can combine the two techniques above into:

Fraction(*0.25.as_integer_ratio())

Or you can just use the Fraction.from_float() class method:

Fraction.from_float(0.25)

which essentially does the same thing, e.g. take the integer ratio tuple and pass that in as two separate arguments.

And a small demo with your sample values:

>>> for f in (0.25, 0.5, 1.25, 3.0):
...     print f.as_integer_ratio()
...     print repr(Fraction(f)), Fraction(f)
... 
(1, 4)
Fraction(1, 4) 1/4
(1, 2)
Fraction(1, 2) 1/2
(5, 4)
Fraction(5, 4) 5/4
(3, 1)
Fraction(3, 1) 3

Both the fractions module and the float.as_integer_ratio() method are new in Python 2.6.

9
  • 1
    Thanks! Options 1 works, but option 2 (Fraction(0.25)) gives me the error: "TypeError: 'float' object cannot be interpreted as an index". Can you tell me why? Commented Apr 28, 2014 at 14:57
  • 1
    @user2370460: What version of Python are you using?
    – Martijn Pieters
    Commented Apr 28, 2014 at 14:58
  • 5
    @user2370460: Ah, yes, only version 2.7 and up support passing in a float or decimal type; use Fraction(*(0.25).as_integer_ratio()) instead in that case.
    – Martijn Pieters
    Commented Apr 28, 2014 at 15:02
  • 1
    Note, both the fractions module and float.as_integer_ratio were added in Python 2.6. If you're running an older version of Python these will not be available.
    – IceArdor
    Commented Apr 28, 2014 at 16:47
  • 3
    @user2370460: I totally managed to miss the available Fraction.from_float() class method, much clearer. Fraction.from_float(0.25).
    – Martijn Pieters
    Commented Apr 29, 2014 at 0:38
15
from fractions import Fraction

print(Fraction(0.25))
print(Fraction(0.5))
print(Fraction(1.25))
print(Fraction(3))

#1/4
#1/2
#5/4
#3
3
  • Thanks, but this gives me: "TypeError: 'float' object cannot be interpreted as an index". Can you tell me why? Commented Apr 28, 2014 at 14:51
  • 2
    Good suggestion, but I'd like to add: the one-argument constructor works well for some numbers, but not others. For instance, Fraction(.2) becomes Fraction(3602879701896397, 18014398509481984). It might be better to use the two-argument constructor, ex. Fraction(2,10)
    – Kevin
    Commented Apr 28, 2014 at 14:54
  • 3
    @Kevin: that's because .2 cannot be accurately represented by a float. See my answer for a workaround; limit the denominator and you can bring back it back to 2/10 in a jiffy.
    – Martijn Pieters
    Commented Apr 29, 2014 at 0:32
13

To expand upon Martijn Pieters excellent answer with an additional option due to the imprecision inherent with more complex floats. For example:

>>> f = 0.8857097
>>> f.as_integer_ratio()
(1994440937439217, 2251799813685248)          # mathematically wrong
>>> Fraction(f)
Fraction(1994440937439217, 2251799813685248)  # same result but in a class
>>> Fraction(f).limit_denominator()
Fraction(871913, 984423)                      # still imprecise

The mathematical result desired was 8857097/10000000 which can be achieved by casting to a string and then manipulating it.

Edited Response

I found a much simpler way to resolve the accuracy issue.

>>> Fraction(str(f))
Fraction(8857097, 10000000)

Casting as to a string also allows for accurate Decimal instances

>>> Decimal(f).as_integer_ratio()
(1994440937439217, 2251799813685248)
>>> Decimal(str(f)).as_integer_ratio()
(8857097, 10000000)

Original Response

def float_to_ratio(flt):
    if int(flt) == flt:        # to prevent 3.0 -> 30/10
        return int(flt), 1
    flt_str = str(flt)
    flt_split = flt_str.split('.')
    numerator = int(''.join(flt_split))
    denominator = 10 ** len(flt_split[1])
    return numerator, denominator

Now let's test it:

>>> float_to_ratio(f)
(8857097, 10000000)      # mathematically correct

I will note that this kind of fraction precision is not optimized and will usually not be needed, but for completeness it is here. This function doesn't simplify the fraction, but you can do additional processing to reduce it:

>>> n = 0.5
>>> float_to_ratio(n)
(5, 10)
>>> Fraction(*float_to_ratio(n))
Fraction(1, 2)
7

If you'd like to print a proper fraction, this little recipe should do:

from fractions import Fraction    

def dec_to_proper_frac(dec):
    sign = "-" if dec < 0 else ""
    frac = Fraction(abs(dec))
    return (f"{sign}{frac.numerator // frac.denominator} "
            f"{frac.numerator % frac.denominator}/{frac.denominator}")

This will print as follows:

>>> dec_to_proper_frac(3.75)
>>> "3 3/4"
0
1

This is how to do it simple and properly.

By using Fraction:

from fractions import Fraction
decimals = [0.25, 0.5, 1.25, 3, 0.6, 0.84]

for d in decimals:
    print(Fraction(str(d))) #Cast as string for proper fraction

By using Decimal:

from  decimal import Decimal
decimals = [0.25, 0.5, 1.25, 3, 0.6, 0.84]

for d in decimals:
    d = Decimal(str(d)) #Cast as string for proper fraction
    nominator,denominator = d.as_integer_ratio()
    if denominator==1:
        print(a)
    else:
        print(nominator,denominator, sep="/")

Output:

1/4
1/2
5/4
3
3/5
21/25
0

One of the easiest way is to use as_integer_ratio() like this.

b = 0.125

b.as_integer_ratio()

# Output as Tuple(1, 8).Numerator as 1 & Denominator as 8

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