6

TL;DR

Is it possible to find out in a finally clause whether there's an outstanding uncaught exception?

Background

I want to iterate over items to do some relatively expensive processing on them, which is likely to break and raise an exception. So I'd like to save my place. But saving state is also pretty expensive - so I'd rather not do it every single time, just when there's an exception in the code I yield to.

I'm imagining something vaguely shaped like:

def get_things(my_iterator):
    for items in my_iterator:
        try:
            yield item
        finally:
            if something_went_wrong():  # magic oracle function for failure
                save_state(item)
        continue_normal_processing()

but I don't know whether that's even possible. Notably, except Exception: doesn't raise anything, because the exception isn't in this function.

4
  • 1
    You mean elsewhere an exception is raised, outside of this generator? Then try:/finally: is not the right way to go about this; there is nothing to try here.
    – Martijn Pieters
    Apr 28 '14 at 17:14
  • 2
    How would yield raise an exception? If an exception occurs on generating the next item, wouldn't that already be raised by the loop? Also, why not just use except instead of finally here?
    – tobias_k
    Apr 28 '14 at 17:16
  • What exactly is raising the exception? Is my_iterator a source of exceptions?
    – Martijn Pieters
    Apr 28 '14 at 17:53
  • You should post the TD;DR part as the first sentence because that is displayed as a short-descriprion of this question to those who answer.
    – User
    Apr 28 '14 at 19:31
6

... seems I was totally wrong about except's behaviour.

def f():
    for i in range(10):
        try:
            yield i
        except Exception:
            print "Nope, this broke"
            raise


for x in f():
    print x
    if x == 2:
        raise IndexError

returns

0
1
2
Nope, this broke
Traceback (most recent call last):
...
IndexError
5
  • 4
    I did not expect this behaviour. Cool.
    – User
    Apr 29 '14 at 17:47
  • 3
    More information for the next person who's puzzled by this: the "Nope, this broke" prints during the garbage collection of the generator. May 12 '15 at 19:37
  • For what it's worth, I just ran this code sample on 2.7.12 and I'm not getting a print of "Nope, this broke".
    – Skinner927
    Mar 30 '18 at 19:36
  • @DanielStutzbach - To clarify, are you saying that this behaviour only occurs because f() is a generator function?
    – PeterByte
    Aug 13 '18 at 8:08
  • In python 3.8 it raises IndexError without handling.
    – dawid
    Jun 10 '20 at 4:18
1

This should be similar to what you want:

class CatchingExceptionsIterator:
    def __init__(self, generator):
        self.generator = generator
        self.error = None
    def __enter__(self):
        return self
    def next(self):
        if self.error is None:
            return next(self.generator)
        else:
            error = self.error
            self.error = None
            return self.generator.throw(*error)
    __next__ = next
    def __exit__(self, ty, err, tb):
        if ty is not None:
            self.error = ty, err, tb
            return True
    def __iter__(self):
        return self


def f():
    for i in range(10):
        try:
            print("yield")
            yield i
            print("returnFomYield")
        except:
            import traceback
            traceback.print_exc()


c = CatchingExceptionsIterator(f())
for i in c:
    with c:
        print(i)
        if i == 5:
            nameerror

It must be adjusted to fit the exact usecase.
The output is:

yield
0
returnFomYield
yield
1
returnFomYield
yield
2
returnFomYield
yield
3
returnFomYield
yield
4
returnFomYield
yield
5
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "withiteration.py", line 27, in f
    yield i
  File "withiteration.py", line 39, in <module>
    nameerror
NameError: name 'nameerror' is not defined
yield
6
returnFomYield
yield
7
returnFomYield
yield
8
returnFomYield
yield
9
returnFomYield

An additional finally clause would also be executed.

Is it possible to find out in a finally clause whether there's an outstanding uncaught exception?

Why? You could use except. Explain this in more detail.

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