0

Say I have an ng-click event on an button

<button ng-click="callMe()" />

And in my AngularJS Controller I have something like

myApp.controller('myController', ['$scope', function ($scope)] {
    $scope.callMe = function() {
        console.log("call originated from...");
    };

    $scope.anotherMethod = function(){
        $scope.callMe();
    }
});

Can I tell from inside the callMe method where it was called from? i.e. did the user trigger it when clicking on the button or was it from the anotherMethod method?

Ideally, I'd like not to have to pass around additional variables inside my function calls. e.g.

callMe('fromClick')

Thanks

  • pass a parameter – karaxuna Apr 28 '14 at 17:49
  • you COULD use arguments.callee.caller, but it is officially deprecated and won't work in strict mode: jsfiddle.net/P24dY/1 – basilikum Apr 28 '14 at 17:53
2

If you have to perform different tasks, when the function was triggered by a click or by something else, my suggestion would be to use different functions and only use the same function for the tasks that are actually the same:

HTML

<button ng-click="onClick()" />

JavaScript

myApp.controller('myController', ['$scope', function ($scope)] {

    $scope.onClick = function () {
        //do click related tasks 

        callMe();
    };

    $scope.anotherMethod = function(){
        //do other tasks

        callMe();
    };

    function callMe() {
        //do stuff that has to be done in both cases
    }
});
  • This is the best option for me, thanks. – ShaneH Apr 29 '14 at 9:18
0

You can do:

<button ng-click="callMe($event)" />

$scope.callMe = function($event) {
    console.log("call originated from..." + $event.target);
};

But this goes agains't AngularJS phisolophy (hurts the separation between view and controller). Check out Accessing clicked element in angularjs for a more complete answer with an alternative solution.

0

What I've done to do this is use $broadcast.

https://docs.angularjs.org/api/ng/type/$rootScope.Scope

Here is an example of use:

You need to pass $rootScope to your controller

myApp.controller('myController', ['$scope, $rootScope', function ($scope, $rootScope)] {

Then in your $scope.callMe():

$scope.callMe = function() {
  console.log("call originated from...");
  $rootScope.$broadcast('callThis')
};

Lastly in your $scope.anotherMethod():

$scope.isCallThis = false

$scope.anotherMethod = function () {
  if (!$scope.isCallThis) {
    $scope.$on('callThis', function () {
      // Do stuff here
    })

    $scope.isCallThis = true
  }
}

I used the $scope.isCallThis = false to make sure you are only setting the $scope.$on() once.

I hope this helps, I usually use this when I'm creating directives and I need to trigger a block of code.

  • you are adding a new event handler every time the function anotherMethod is called. – basilikum Apr 28 '14 at 18:08
  • Oh right. I forgot if I use it in the controller I usually place a boolean check around it so it only runs once. – jhays Apr 28 '14 at 18:13

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