0

Below is a short doctor program that I am making and this is the start, unfortunately, it doesn't work. Here is the error I receive - TypeError: input expected at most 1 arguments, got 4

least = 0
most = 100

while True:
    try:
        levelofpain = int(input("How much is it hurting on a scale of", (least), "to", (most)))
        while llevelofpain < least or levelofpain > most:
            print ("Please enter a number from", (least), "to", (most))
            levelofpain = int(input("How much is it hurting on a scale of", (least), "to", (most)))
        break
    except ValueError:
        print ("Please enter a number from", (least), "to", (most))

Thanks in advance!

p.s. using python 3.3

2

The error message is self-explanatory -- you are passing four arguments to input(...) where it is only accepting one.

The fix is to turn the argument into a single string.

levelofpain = int(input(
    "How much is it hurting on a scale of {} to {}? ".format(least, most)))
  • thanks but is there a way to do it without using a function – user3584575 Apr 29 '14 at 9:41
  • You could catenate "string " + str(least) + " more string" etc but that's hardly an improvement. Why would you want to avoid using a function? Functions are your friends. – tripleee Apr 29 '14 at 10:52
  • 1
    print (str("Please enter a number from", (least), "to", (most))) – AHuman Apr 29 '14 at 15:54
0

For formatting strings, you probably want to use Python's .format() function. Take a look at this question: String Formatting in Python 3

There are two main methods for formatting strings in Python, the new way using the .format method of the str class, and the old C style method of using the % symbol:

str.format():

"This is a string with the numbers {} and {} and {0}".format(1, 2)

C Style Format (%):

"This is another string with %d %f %d" % (1, 1.5, 2)

I strongly recommend not using the C Style Format, instead use the modern function version. Another way I don't recommend is replacing the input function with your own definition:

old_input = input
def input(*args):
    s = ''.join([str(a) for a in args])
    return old_input(s)

input("This", "is", 1, 2, 3, "a test: ")
  • thanks but is there a way to do it without using functions – user3584575 Apr 29 '14 at 9:41
  • @user3584575 The typical method is just to use the .format() member of string, but see my edit for two other alternatives. You can also use the method triplee mentioned in his comment. – ilent2 Apr 29 '14 at 12:12

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.