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I am developing MVC application. I have two projects in my application. one is MVC application contains, Controller and Views and the second one is DataLayer project.

I am confused about the where to write the connection string, because while publishing the application it takes the web.config file and I get the data from DataLayer project so should I add connection string in the app.config/Web.config of Data layer project ?

Also, would like to know what is the purpose and difference between app.config and web.config ?

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Every project comes with a configuration file when it's created. A general class library has a generic one called app.config. A web project is more specific, so its file is called web.config and comes with web-specific parameters. They both serve the same purpose.

The problem you are facing is that only the executable project's config file (web.config) is deployed by default. You have a few options:

  1. Add your connection string to web.config and pass it to your data layer. This is simple (an most common), but separates the config info from your data layer project.
  2. Have your data layer read web.config using System.Configuration.ConfigurationManager. This alleviates you from passing the data to your data layer, but creates a strong dependency (your data layer will not work without a properly formatted web.config file).
  3. Deploy app.config as XML content and write custom code so that your data layer can read it. This is more work, but it gets your data config out of the web config.
  4. A slight change to #2, you can create a custom config section called "dataLayer" in web.config. This can be read via System.Configuration.ConfigurationManager. I prefer this approach, as it seems like a good balance. You have a custom strongly-typed config section in the "default" config file.

This related question has some good info too.

  • I have added ref. of datalayer in MVC project, how to pass it to datalayer ? – bnil Apr 29 '14 at 12:53
  • Here's how you read it from web.config. Then just pass it as a string to a method or constructor in your data layer. – nunzabar Apr 29 '14 at 13:02
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The connection string goes in the Web.config. By default it's going to look in the config of the executing assembly and ignore the config files of the referenced assemblies.

The config file for the referenced assembly may be used at design time. For example if you are using Entity Framework in your data layer assembly, it will store the connection information that is used to build the model from the database in the app.config.

I generally just copy that connection information over to the web.config when I get to the point that the web project is going to run and access the data through the data layer.

  • DataLayer will use the connection string from web.config file ? – bnil Apr 29 '14 at 11:47
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    Tip: if you don't use it at design time (when using EF Code-First for example), you could even remove it from the app.config and just keep it in the web.config of the Website project – Henk Mollema Apr 29 '14 at 12:07
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  • Web.Config is used for asp.net web projects / web services.
  • App.Config is used for Windows Forms, Windows Services, Console Apps and WPF applications.

Add your connection string in Web.config of Data layer project

  • ok, so I will add connection string in WebConfig file of datalayer . but What about publishing application ? It takes the web Config of the MVC project not dataLayer project... – bnil Apr 29 '14 at 12:06
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    There is no web.config in a class library. – nunzabar Apr 29 '14 at 12:20
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I'll answer your question first, and then move on to what is, IMO a more important consideration. For this particular use case, I prefer a DI pattern, in which the consumer tells the provider what the connection string is. This makes your data layer agnostic of the database, and allows it to talk to any data store that satisfies it's contracts. In short, since your MVC project is the consumer of the data layer, the connection string is stored in the web.config. BUT IT IS STORED ENCRYPTED!!!

Now then, there is actually a deeper issue here than where you physically write the connection string, and that is building an abstraction between your consuming code and the configuration store. If you do this, where you store your configuration values becomes essentially irrelevant.

I always create a Configuration class within each layer (project) that provides the configuration values consumed within that layer. This provides several benefits:

  1. It allows for strongly-typed values when consuming them. If your configuration value is an int, you get an int, and you don't need to convert it when you consume it.
  2. It allows for defaulting values that may have been inadvertently left out of the config file. This makes your code more robust.
  3. It allows for flexibility in where you store the values. You could put some values in a config file, others in a database, and still more could be fetched from a remote web service. If you decide to change a store, you only have to edit the code in one place -- not every place the value is consumed.
  4. As your solution grows and projects are added, the pattern scales well and keeps configurations segregated.
  5. It removes magic strings from your code.

Instead of the following, which has a nasty magic string:

return System.Configuration.ConfigurationManager.AppSettings["DefaultUserName"];

you would write

MyApp.Configuration.DefaultUserName

Here is an example of a very basic implementation which returns a strong type (in this case, a DayOfWeek). It has a helper method to help you abstract the act of pulling from the store. If you needed to include multiple stores, this method would take a generic of type T where T is the type of store. In the below, simplified example, it just pulls from the config file:

 public class Configuration
    {
        private const DayOfWeek FailsafeDefaultDayOfWeek = DayOfWeek.Saturday;

        /// <summary>
        /// A default for the day of week
        /// </summary>
        public static DayOfWeek DefaultDayOfWeek
        {
            get
            {
                string dayOfWeekString = GetSettingValue("DefaultDayOfWeek");

                try
                {
                    return (DayOfWeek)Enum.Parse(typeof(DayOfWeek), dayOfWeekString);
                }
                catch (Exception)
                {
                    // If someone screws up and forgets to include a value, or the value cannot be cast:
                    return FailsafeDefaultDayOfWeek;
                }
            }
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Helper method to easily pull a value from a configuration store.
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="settingName"></param>
        /// <returns></returns>
        private static string GetSettingValue(string settingName)
        {
            try
            {
                return System.Configuration.ConfigurationManager.AppSettings[settingName];
            }
            catch (Exception)
            {
                throw new MissingConfigurationValueException(settingName);
            }
        }
    }

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