48

It's a question which has been asked many times, however there is no well supported answer I could find.

Many people suggest the use of top command, but if you run top once (because you have a script for example collecting Cpu usage every 1 second) it will always give the same Cpu usage result (example 1, example 2).

A more accurate way to calculate CPU usage, is by reading the values from /proc/stat, but most of the answers use only the first 4 fields from /proc/stat to calculate it (one example here).

/proc/stat/ has 10 fields per CPU core as of Linux kernel 2.6.33!

I also found this Accurately Calculating CPU Utilization in Linux using /proc/stat question which is pointing out the same issue, -that most other questions only take into consideration 4 out of the many fields- but still the answer given here starts with "I think" (not certain), and except that, it is only concerned about the first 7 fields (out of 10 in /proc/stat/)

This perl script uses all of the fields to calculate the CPU usage, which again I do not think is correct after some further investigation.

After taking a quick look into the kernel code here, it looks like, for example, guest_nice and guest fields are always increasing together with nice and user (so they should not be included in the cpu usage calculation, since they are included in nice and user fields already)

/*
 * Account guest cpu time to a process.
 * @p: the process that the cpu time gets accounted to
 * @cputime: the cpu time spent in virtual machine since the last update
 * @cputime_scaled: cputime scaled by cpu frequency
 */
static void account_guest_time(struct task_struct *p, cputime_t cputime,
                   cputime_t cputime_scaled)
{
    u64 *cpustat = kcpustat_this_cpu->cpustat;

    /* Add guest time to process. */
    p->utime += cputime;
    p->utimescaled += cputime_scaled;
    account_group_user_time(p, cputime);
    p->gtime += cputime;

    /* Add guest time to cpustat. */
    if (task_nice(p) > 0) {
        cpustat[CPUTIME_NICE] += (__force u64) cputime;
        cpustat[CPUTIME_GUEST_NICE] += (__force u64) cputime;
    } else {
        cpustat[CPUTIME_USER] += (__force u64) cputime;
        cpustat[CPUTIME_GUEST] += (__force u64) cputime;
    }
}

So to sum up, what is an accurate way to calculate the CPU usage in Linux and which fields should be considered in the calculations and how (which fields are attributed to the idle time and which fields to non-idle time)?

  • The right way to collect CPU usage information every second is to run top -b continuously. – n.m. Apr 29 '14 at 15:38
  • I would like to collect data by using a 3rd party script and CPU is only one of the metrics need to be collected. So I would like to calculate CPU usage since the previous run (interval might vary) of this 3rd party script. top -b runs continuously, so it has to run in a separate thread and save the collected data in a different output. – Vangelis Tasoulas Apr 29 '14 at 16:36
  • What CPU usage are looking for? A single process? System-wide? Should it be expressed as a percentage, seconds, ...? – wallyk Apr 29 '14 at 22:13
  • Percentage of usage from the previous measurement! – Vangelis Tasoulas Apr 29 '14 at 22:44
60

According the htop source code at the time of writing, my assumptions looks like they are valid:

(see void ProcessList_scan(ProcessList* this) function at ProcessList.c)

// Guest time is already accounted in usertime
usertime = usertime - guest;                     # As you see here, it subtracts guest from user time
nicetime = nicetime - guestnice;                 # and guest_nice from nice time
// Fields existing on kernels >= 2.6
// (and RHEL's patched kernel 2.4...)
idlealltime = idletime + ioWait;                 # ioWait is added in the idleTime
systemalltime = systemtime + irq + softIrq;
virtalltime = guest + guestnice;
totaltime = usertime + nicetime + systemalltime + idlealltime + steal + virtalltime;

And so, from fields listed in the first line of /proc/stat: (see section 1.8 at documentation)

     user    nice   system  idle      iowait irq   softirq  steal  guest  guest_nice
cpu  74608   2520   24433   1117073   6176   4054  0        0      0      0

Algorithmically, we can calculate the CPU usage percentage like:

PrevIdle = previdle + previowait
Idle = idle + iowait

PrevNonIdle = prevuser + prevnice + prevsystem + previrq + prevsoftirq + prevsteal
NonIdle = user + nice + system + irq + softirq + steal

PrevTotal = PrevIdle + PrevNonIdle
Total = Idle + NonIdle

# differentiate: actual value minus the previous one
totald = Total - PrevTotal
idled = Idle - PrevIdle

CPU_Percentage = (totald - idled)/totald
  • 4
    I'd like to share a little example program that I created based on this answer: github.com/scaidermern/top-processes. Feel free to make us of it, it is licensed under CC0. – scai Aug 14 '16 at 12:00
  • I reckon iowait is an uninterruptible state, so it would be more practical to count it to "business" rather than idle. – wick Jun 8 '17 at 16:44
  • guest and guest_nice should be added to NonIdle as well according to this post: unix.stackexchange.com/a/303224 – K Erlandsson Nov 7 '17 at 11:06
9

The following is a bash script which is based on Vangelis's answer. It produces output like this:

total 49.1803
cpu0 14.2857
cpu1 100
cpu2 28.5714
cpu3 100
cpu4 30
cpu5 25

Create a file called get_cpu_usage.sh

Run it using the following command: bash get_cpu_usage.sh 0.2

The argument is the number of seconds to measure. In this case it's 200 milliseconds.

The contents are:

#!/bin/sh

sleepDurationSeconds=$1

previousDate=$(date +%s%N | cut -b1-13)
previousStats=$(cat /proc/stat)

sleep $sleepDurationSeconds

currentDate=$(date +%s%N | cut -b1-13)
currentStats=$(cat /proc/stat)    

cpus=$(echo "$currentStats" | grep -P 'cpu' | awk -F " " '{print $1}')

for cpu in $cpus
do
    currentLine=$(echo "$currentStats" | grep "$cpu ")
    user=$(echo "$currentLine" | awk -F " " '{print $2}')
    nice=$(echo "$currentLine" | awk -F " " '{print $3}')
    system=$(echo "$currentLine" | awk -F " " '{print $4}')
    idle=$(echo "$currentLine" | awk -F " " '{print $5}')
    iowait=$(echo "$currentLine" | awk -F " " '{print $6}')
    irq=$(echo "$currentLine" | awk -F " " '{print $7}')
    softirq=$(echo "$currentLine" | awk -F " " '{print $8}')
    steal=$(echo "$currentLine" | awk -F " " '{print $9}')
    guest=$(echo "$currentLine" | awk -F " " '{print $10}')
    guest_nice=$(echo "$currentLine" | awk -F " " '{print $11}')

    previousLine=$(echo "$previousStats" | grep "$cpu ")
    prevuser=$(echo "$previousLine" | awk -F " " '{print $2}')
    prevnice=$(echo "$previousLine" | awk -F " " '{print $3}')
    prevsystem=$(echo "$previousLine" | awk -F " " '{print $4}')
    previdle=$(echo "$previousLine" | awk -F " " '{print $5}')
    previowait=$(echo "$previousLine" | awk -F " " '{print $6}')
    previrq=$(echo "$previousLine" | awk -F " " '{print $7}')
    prevsoftirq=$(echo "$previousLine" | awk -F " " '{print $8}')
    prevsteal=$(echo "$previousLine" | awk -F " " '{print $9}')
    prevguest=$(echo "$previousLine" | awk -F " " '{print $10}')
    prevguest_nice=$(echo "$previousLine" | awk -F " " '{print $11}')    

    PrevIdle=$((previdle + previowait))
    Idle=$((idle + iowait))

    PrevNonIdle=$((prevuser + prevnice + prevsystem + previrq + prevsoftirq + prevsteal))
    NonIdle=$((user + nice + system + irq + softirq + steal))

    PrevTotal=$((PrevIdle + PrevNonIdle))
    Total=$((Idle + NonIdle))

    totald=$((Total - PrevTotal))
    idled=$((Idle - PrevIdle))

    CPU_Percentage=$(awk "BEGIN {print ($totald - $idled)/$totald*100}")

    if [[ "$cpu" == "cpu" ]]; then
        echo "total "$CPU_Percentage
    else
        echo $cpu" "$CPU_Percentage
    fi
done
6

Hey i was also researching for the topic and found this thread really helpful. I used Vangelis Tasoulas formula to write a small python script for this. Attached is my Python code for the issue. It loads the cpu usage per cpu_id every second. Maybe its helps others as well. Also comments/suggestions are welcome :-)

#!/usr/bin/python 
# -*- coding: utf-8 -*-

'''
Created on 04.12.2014

@author: plagtag
'''
from time import sleep
import sys

class GetCpuLoad(object):
    '''
    classdocs
    '''


    def __init__(self, percentage=True, sleeptime = 1):
        '''
        @parent class: GetCpuLoad
        @date: 04.12.2014
        @author: plagtag
        @info: 
        @param:
        @return: CPU load in percentage
        '''
        self.percentage = percentage
        self.cpustat = '/proc/stat'
        self.sep = ' ' 
        self.sleeptime = sleeptime

    def getcputime(self):
        '''
        http://stackoverflow.com/questions/23367857/accurate-calculation-of-cpu-usage-given-in-percentage-in-linux
        read in cpu information from file
        The meanings of the columns are as follows, from left to right:
            0cpuid: number of cpu
            1user: normal processes executing in user mode
            2nice: niced processes executing in user mode
            3system: processes executing in kernel mode
            4idle: twiddling thumbs
            5iowait: waiting for I/O to complete
            6irq: servicing interrupts
            7softirq: servicing softirqs

        #the formulas from htop 
             user    nice   system  idle      iowait irq   softirq  steal  guest  guest_nice
        cpu  74608   2520   24433   1117073   6176   4054  0        0      0      0


        Idle=idle+iowait
        NonIdle=user+nice+system+irq+softirq+steal
        Total=Idle+NonIdle # first line of file for all cpus

        CPU_Percentage=((Total-PrevTotal)-(Idle-PrevIdle))/(Total-PrevTotal)
        '''
        cpu_infos = {} #collect here the information
        with open(self.cpustat,'r') as f_stat:
            lines = [line.split(self.sep) for content in f_stat.readlines() for line in content.split('\n') if line.startswith('cpu')]

            #compute for every cpu
            for cpu_line in lines:
                if '' in cpu_line: cpu_line.remove('')#remove empty elements
                cpu_line = [cpu_line[0]]+[float(i) for i in cpu_line[1:]]#type casting
                cpu_id,user,nice,system,idle,iowait,irq,softrig,steal,guest,guest_nice = cpu_line

                Idle=idle+iowait
                NonIdle=user+nice+system+irq+softrig+steal

                Total=Idle+NonIdle
                #update dictionionary
                cpu_infos.update({cpu_id:{'total':Total,'idle':Idle}})
            return cpu_infos

    def getcpuload(self):
        '''
        CPU_Percentage=((Total-PrevTotal)-(Idle-PrevIdle))/(Total-PrevTotal)

        '''
        start = self.getcputime()
        #wait a second
        sleep(self.sleeptime)
        stop = self.getcputime()

        cpu_load = {}

        for cpu in start:
            Total = stop[cpu]['total']
            PrevTotal = start[cpu]['total']

            Idle = stop[cpu]['idle']
            PrevIdle = start[cpu]['idle']
            CPU_Percentage=((Total-PrevTotal)-(Idle-PrevIdle))/(Total-PrevTotal)*100
            cpu_load.update({cpu: CPU_Percentage})
        return cpu_load


if __name__=='__main__':
    x = GetCpuLoad()
    while True:
        try:
            data = x.getcpuload()
            print data
        except KeyboardInterrupt:

            sys.exit("Finished")                
1

idnt.net has a good description for how to use the /proc/stat cpu data, include a bash-script for extracting cpu and description of the lines. I just wanted to link it here, since I found it valuable.

0
#!/usr/bin/ruby -w

    prev_file = IO.readlines(::File.join('', 'proc', 'stat')).select { |line| line.start_with?('cpu') }
    Kernel.sleep(0.05)
    file = IO.readlines(::File.join('', 'proc', 'stat')).select { |line| line.start_with?('cpu') }

    file.size.times do |i|
        data, prev_data = file[i].split.map(&:to_f), prev_file[i].split.map(&:to_f)

        %w(user nice sys idle iowait irq softirq steal).each_with_index do |el, index|
            eval "@#{el}, @prev_#{el} = #{data[index + 1]}, #{prev_data[index + 1]}"
        end

        previdle, idle = @prev_idle + @prev_iowait, @idle + @iowait
        totald = idle + (@user + @nice + @sys + @irq + @softirq + @steal) -
            (previdle + (@prev_user + @prev_nice + @prev_sys + @prev_irq + @prev_softirq + @prev_steal))

        puts "CPU #{i}: #{((totald - (idle - previdle)) / totald * 100).round(2)} %"
    end

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