11

This question might sound a little bit stupid, but there's a lack of documentation.

In order to hash strings in Android, we can use MessageDigest, which is from java.security package.

However, the basic setup is like the following:

MessageDigest.getInstance( "SHA-512" );

Which is not cool, therefore:

  1. Can we know which algorithms are available on the current device? What does it depend on? Android SDK? Java SDK? This is painful in Android, because of the segmentation we've to handle...

  2. Why the hell don't we have a Constant / Enum for that string??? Aren't them common for the whole world?

I hope you can answer both of my questions.

Thanks.

3
  • As all literals, "SHA-512" seems pretty constant to me. If you mean an enum, it would make extensibility very difficult. If you mean, a class with an static final String SHA_512 = "SHA_512"; you can have it, but I fail to see its point.
    – SJuan76
    Commented Apr 29, 2014 at 20:10
  • Yea an enum would be cool. For instance, you could know which algorithms are supported, if they're in that Enum. Sending a "developers-must-know" string, is not really a best practices...
    – Reinherd
    Commented Apr 29, 2014 at 20:12
  • But would require a list of "approved" digesters at the moment of the JDK compilation. With the current approach, I can swap the digester for a new one of my invention the moment I like. In fact, if I do things right, I will have that value in a .properties or a JNDI or something like that and I will just provide the digester and change the property and voilà! everything is ok and running.
    – SJuan76
    Commented Apr 29, 2014 at 20:22

4 Answers 4

8

https://developer.android.com/reference/java/security/MessageDigest.html shows the following:

Name    | Supported (API Levels)
MD5     | 1+
SHA-1   | 1+
SHA-224 | 1–8,22+
SHA-256 | 1+
SHA-384 | 1+
SHA-512 | 1+

Does this help?

1
  • This should be the accepted answer. All Android devices provide these five (not counting SHA-224) hash algorithms. If you catch a NoSuchAlgorithmException with any of them, you should notify the user that his or her device is not trustworthy because the crypto implementation has been tampered with. Oh, and don't use MD5 if you can avoid it, and don't use SHA-1 for new designs.
    – Chrissi
    Commented Aug 4, 2017 at 11:31
5

As someone already mentioned, there's not a clear way to find out which algorithms are available. So what I decided to do, is to create a helper for that.

import android.util.Base64;

import java.security.MessageDigest;
import java.security.NoSuchAlgorithmException;
import java.security.spec.KeySpec;

import javax.crypto.SecretKeyFactory;
import javax.crypto.spec.PBEKeySpec;

/**
 * Created by sergi.castellsague on 04/05/2014.
 */
public class SecurityManager
{
private static final int ITERATIONS = 1000;

public enum HashMethod
{
    PBKDF2(){
        @Override
        public String getHashString()
        {
            return "PBKDF2WithHmacSHA1";
        }
    }, SHA512(){
        @Override
        public String getHashString() {
            return "SHA-512";
        }
    }, SHA384() {
        @Override
        public String getHashString() {
            return "SHA-384";
        }
    }, SHA256() {
        @Override
        public String getHashString () {
            return "SHA-256";
        }
    }
    , SHA1()
    {
        @Override
        public String getHashString() {
            return "SHA-1";
        }
    };

    public abstract String getHashString();

}

public static HashMethod getAppropriateHash()
{
    HashMethod method = null;

    if ( isPBKDFAvailable() )
    {
        method = HashMethod.PBKDF2;
    }
    else if( isDigestAvailable( HashMethod.SHA512.getHashString() ) )
    {
        method = HashMethod.SHA512;
    }
    else if( isDigestAvailable( HashMethod.SHA384.getHashString() ) )
    {
        method = HashMethod.SHA384;
    }
    else if( isDigestAvailable( HashMethod.SHA256.getHashString() ) )
    {
        method = HashMethod.SHA256;
    }
    else if( isDigestAvailable( HashMethod.SHA1.getHashString() ) )
    {
        method = HashMethod.SHA1;
    }

    return method;
}


private static boolean isPBKDFAvailable()
{
    try
    {
        SecretKeyFactory.getInstance( HashMethod.PBKDF2.getHashString() );
    }
    catch ( Exception notAvailable)
    {
        return false;
    }
    return true;
}

private static boolean isDigestAvailable( String method )
{
    try
    {
        MessageDigest.getInstance( method );
    }
    catch ( Exception notAvailable )
    {
        return false;
    }

    return true;
}

public static String getHashedPassword( HashMethod method, String password )
{
    String hashed;

    if ( HashMethod.PBKDF2.getHashString().equals( method.getHashString() ) )
    {
        hashed = generatePBKDF( password );
    }
    else
    {
        hashed = password;
        for ( int i = 0; i < ITERATIONS; i++ )
        {
            hashed = generateDigestPassword( password, method.getHashString() );
        }
    }

    return hashed;
}

private static String generatePBKDF( String password )
{
    // Generate a 512-bit key
    final int outputKeyLength = 512;

    char[] chars = new char[password.length()];
    password.getChars( 0, password.length(), chars, 0 );
    byte[] salt = "salt_on_client_is_funny".getBytes(); // In security terms, this is worthess. However, it's required.

    byte[] hashedPassBytes = new byte[0];
    try
    {
        SecretKeyFactory secretKeyFactory = SecretKeyFactory.getInstance( HashMethod.PBKDF2.getHashString() );
        KeySpec keySpec = new PBEKeySpec( chars, salt, ITERATIONS, outputKeyLength );

        hashedPassBytes = secretKeyFactory.generateSecret( keySpec ).getEncoded();
    }
    catch ( Exception shouldNotHappen )
    {}

    return Base64.encodeToString( hashedPassBytes, Base64.DEFAULT );
}

private static String generateDigestPassword( String password, String algorithm )
{
    byte[] digest = new byte[0];
    byte[] buffer = password.getBytes();

    try {
        MessageDigest messageDigest = MessageDigest.getInstance( algorithm );
        messageDigest.reset();
        messageDigest.update( buffer );
        digest = messageDigest.digest();
    }
    catch ( NoSuchAlgorithmException ex )
    {}

    return Base64.encodeToString(digest, Base64.DEFAULT);
}
}

The usage is pretty simple:

String password = "BestPasswordEver123!!";
SecurityManager.HashMethod hashMethod = SecurityManager.getAppropriateHash();
SecurityManager.getHashedPassword( hashMethod, password )

Oh, and note that depending on:

  1. Algorithm used
  2. Amount of iterations
  3. Device

The calculation, might be something from 0.5s to 10s (or more...), so you better do it in an other Thread =)

1

I bumbed into this question while I was looking for hash function implementation. I know that this question has over 7 years but here is the link from the documentation about the avaible algorithms (with api levels):

https://developer.android.com/reference/javax/crypto/SecretKeyFactory

0

All I can think of is trial and error. Find out which values the hasher instantiator will accept, and to make sure it's the right hash compare the output with what you get from sha256sum or related commands.

4
  • I don't really like this approach, tho I've thought about it. If I do it this way, I should be taking care of every single device configuration, and I don't really like that. I guess I will have to do it, if there's no algorithm method common in every device.
    – Reinherd
    Commented Apr 29, 2014 at 20:14
  • It is not elegant for sure, but if you can decipher it, you could contribute with a good example for the internet and gain lots of reputation :3
    – RAKK
    Commented Apr 29, 2014 at 20:16
  • What I am afraid of, is that every manufacturer, might change java package in order to "optimize" <cough>samsung</cough> and that means that I should run that test for... 25k different devices? :D
    – Reinherd
    Commented Apr 29, 2014 at 20:17
  • That's why there are more iPhone apps than Android apps, on Android you have to code for a zillion devices, and on iPhone you just have to code for the latest iPhone and that's it. As an Android fan, I find this truth awful, but it is what it is .____________.
    – RAKK
    Commented Apr 29, 2014 at 20:26

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