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I have an array that it will gets updated during my program and I need to keep track of all updates. So I am trying to store each time the updated array in an ArrayList. for example:

double[]a={1,2,3}
List<double[]> Store = new ArrayList<double[]>();
Store.add(a);

then I will update 'a' like: a[0]=10; and then I want to store new 'a' in another row at the end of 'Store': Store.add(a)

However, once I try to store new 'a' in 'Store' ArrayList, it updates automatically previous 'a''s too. So it gives me this output for 'Store': 10,2,3 10,2,3

But I need to have following output for 'Store' instead:

1,2,3 10,2,3

Anyone can help me with this problem? Thanks.

  • Why are you using a List of array? – Elliott Frisch Apr 29 '14 at 20:45
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You have one array, and you keep adding references to that one array to your list.

You could consider:

double[] a = {1,2,3};
List<double[]> store = new ArrayList<double[]>();
store.add(Arrays.copyOf(a, a.length));

.. to store a new copy of 'a' every time.

  • Thank you so much. I really appreciate your help. That worked. – user3586916 Apr 29 '14 at 20:47
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Arrays in Java are passed by reference. That means that when you add "a", you are adding a reference to "a", and when you change "a", all other instances of that array will change as well.

What you need to do is copy the array into a new piece of data, and store that. You can use System.arraycopy().

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The problem is that you are just updating the values of 'double [] a' and not creating a new array for each distinct copy so you are adding more copies of the same reference in the array.

You probably want to either use System.ArrayCopy before you add it, or just create a new instance of the array.

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arraysare objects,you're doing side effect.

do something like Store.add(a.clone()) it should work with primitives easly

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