90

Learning Scala currently and needed to invert a Map to do some inverted value->key lookups. I was looking for a simple way to do this, but came up with only:

(Map() ++ origMap.map(kvp=>(kvp._2->kvp._1)))

Anybody have a more elegant approach?

10 Answers 10

160

Assuming values are unique, this works:

(Map() ++ origMap.map(_.swap))

On Scala 2.8, however, it's easier:

origMap.map(_.swap)

Being able to do that is part of the reason why Scala 2.8 has a new collection library.

  • 1
    Careful! You can loose values with this solution. For example Map(1 -> "A", 2 -> "B", 3 -> "B").map(_.swap) results in Map(A -> 1, B -> 3) – dev-null Apr 4 at 14:06
  • @dev-null I'm sorry, but your example does not fall under the required assumption. – Daniel C. Sobral May 2 at 17:01
41

Mathematically, the mapping might not be invertible (injective), e.g., from Map[A,B], you can't get Map[B,A], but rather you get Map[B,Set[A]], because there might be different keys associated with same values. So, if you are interested in knowing all the keys, here's the code:

scala> val m = Map(1 -> "a", 2 -> "b", 4 -> "b")
scala> m.groupBy(_._2).mapValues(_.keys)
res0: Map[String,Iterable[Int]] = Map(b -> Set(2, 4), a -> Set(1))
  • 2
    .map(_._1) would be more legibile as just .keys – cheezsteak Feb 12 '16 at 18:13
  • Now thanks to you, even a few characters shorter. The difference now is that you get Sets instead of Lists as before. – Rok Kralj Feb 12 '16 at 18:18
  • 1
    Be careful when using .mapValues because it returns a view. Occasionally, this is what you want, but if you aren't careful it can consume lots of memory and CPU. To force it into a map, you can do m.groupBy(_._2).mapVaues(_.keys).map(identity), or you could replace the call to .mapValues(_.keys) with .map { case (k, v) => k -> v.keys }. – Mark T. Feb 7 at 20:41
10

You can avoid the ._1 stuff while iterating in few ways.

Here's one way. This uses a partial function that covers the one and only case that matters for the map:

Map() ++ (origMap map {case (k,v) => (v,k)})

Here's another way:

import Function.tupled        
Map() ++ (origMap map tupled {(k,v) => (v,k)})

The map iteration calls a function with a two element tuple, and the anonymous function wants two parameters. Function.tupled makes the translation.

6

I came here looking for a way to invert a Map of type Map[A, Seq[B]] to Map[B, Seq[A]], where each B in the new map is associated with every A in the old map for which the B was contained in A's associated sequence.

E.g.,
Map(1 -> Seq("a", "b"), 2-> Seq("b", "c"))
would invert to
Map("a" -> Seq(1), "b" -> Seq(1, 2), "c" -> Seq(2))

Here's my solution :

val newMap = oldMap.foldLeft(Map[B, Seq[A]]().withDefaultValue(Seq())) {
  case (m, (a, bs)) => bs.foldLeft(m)((map, b) => map.updated(b, m(b) :+ a))
}

where oldMap is of type Map[A, Seq[B]] and newMap is of type Map[B, Seq[A]]

The nested foldLefts make me cringe a little bit, but this is the most straightforward way I could find to accomplish this type of inversion. Anyone have a cleaner solution?

  • very nice solution! @Rok, his solution is somehow different than yours a bit I think because he transforms: Map[A, Seq[B]] to Map[B, Seq[A]] where your solution trasnforms Map[A, Seq[B]] to Map[Seq[B], Seq[A]]. – H.Josef Aug 20 '15 at 17:41
  • In that case, without two nested folds and possible more performant: a.toSeq.flatMap { case (a, b) => b.map(_ -> a) }.groupBy(_._2).mapValues(_.map(_._1)) – Rok Kralj Aug 20 '15 at 19:17
2

You could invert a map using:

val i = origMap.map({case(k, v) => v -> k})

The problem with this approach is that if your values, which have now become the hash keys in your map, are not unique you will drop the duplicate values. To illustrate:

scala> val m = Map("a" -> 1, "b" -> 2, "c" -> 3, "d" -> 1)
m: scala.collection.immutable.Map[String,Int] = Map(a -> 1, b -> 2, c -> 3, d -> 1)

// Notice that 1 -> a is not in our inverted map
scala> val i = m.map({ case(k , v) => v -> k})
i: scala.collection.immutable.Map[Int,String] = Map(1 -> d, 2 -> b, 3 -> c)

To avoid this you can convert your map to a list of tuples first, then invert, so that you don't drop any duplicate values:

scala> val i = m.toList.map({ case(k , v) => v -> k})
i: List[(Int, String)] = List((1,a), (2,b), (3,c), (1,d))
2

OK, so this is a very old question with many good answers, but I've built the ultimate, be-all-and-end-all, Swiss-Army-knife, Map inverter and this is the place to post it.

It's actually two inverters. One for individual value elements...

//from Map[K,V] to Map[V,Set[K]], traverse the input only once
implicit class MapInverterA[K,V](m :Map[K,V]) {
  def invert :Map[V,Set[K]] =
    m.foldLeft(Map.empty[V, Set[K]]) {
      case (acc,(k, v)) => acc + (v -> (acc.getOrElse(v,Set()) + k))
    }
}

...and another, quite similar, for value collections.

import scala.collection.generic.CanBuildFrom
import scala.collection.mutable.Builder
import scala.language.higherKinds

//from Map[K,C[V]] to Map[V,C[K]], traverse the input only once
implicit class MapInverterB[K,V,C[_]](m :Map[K,C[V]]
                                     )(implicit ev :C[V] => TraversableOnce[V]) {
  def invert(implicit bf :CanBuildFrom[Nothing,K,C[K]]) :Map[V,C[K]] =
    m.foldLeft(Map.empty[V, Builder[K,C[K]]]) {
      case (acc, (k, vs)) =>
        vs.foldLeft(acc) {
          case (a, v) => a + (v -> (a.getOrElse(v,bf()) += k))
        }
    }.mapValues(_.result())
}

usage:

Map(2 -> Array('g','h'), 5 -> Array('g','y')).invert
//res0: Map(g -> Array(2, 5), h -> Array(2), y -> Array(5))

Map('q' -> 1.1F, 'b' -> 2.1F, 'c' -> 1.1F, 'g' -> 3F).invert
//res1: Map(1.1 -> Set(q, c), 2.1 -> Set(b), 3.0 -> Set(g))

Map(9 -> "this", 8 -> "that", 3 -> "thus", 2 -> "thus").invert
//res2: Map(this -> Set(9), that -> Set(8), thus -> Set(3, 2))

Map(1L -> Iterator(3,2), 5L -> Iterator(7,8,3)).invert
//res3: Map(3 -> Iterator(1, 5), 2 -> Iterator(1), 7 -> Iterator(5), 8 -> Iterator(5))

Map.empty[Unit,Boolean].invert
//res4: Map[Boolean,Set[Unit]] = Map()

I would prefer to have both methods in the same implicit class but the more time I spent looking into it the more problematic it appeared.

1

In scala REPL:

scala> val m = Map(1 -> "one", 2 -> "two")
m: scala.collection.immutable.Map[Int,java.lang.String] = Map(1 -> one, 2 -> two)

scala> val reversedM = m map { case (k, v) => (v, k) }
reversedM: scala.collection.immutable.Map[java.lang.String,Int] = Map(one -> 1, two -> 2)

Note that duplicate values will be overwritten by the last addition to the map:

scala> val m = Map(1 -> "one", 2 -> "two", 3 -> "one")
m: scala.collection.immutable.Map[Int,java.lang.String] = Map(1 -> one, 2 -> two, 3 -> one)

scala> val reversedM = m map { case (k, v) => (v, k) }
reversedM: scala.collection.immutable.Map[java.lang.String,Int] = Map(one -> 3, two -> 2)
1

Starting Scala 2.13, in order to swap key/values without loosing keys associated to same values, we can use Maps new groupMap method, which (as its name suggests) is an equivalent of a groupBy and a mapping over grouped items.

Map(1 -> "a", 2 -> "b", 4 -> "b").groupMap(_._2)(_._1)
// Map("b" -> List(2, 4), "a" -> List(1))

This:

  • groups elements based on their second tuple part (_._2) (group part of groupMap)

  • maps grouped items by taking their first tuple part (_._1) (map part of groupMap)

This can be seen as a one-pass version of map.groupBy(_._2).mapValues(_.map(_._1)).

  • Too bad it won't transform Map[K, C[V]] into Map[V, C[K]]. – jwvh Feb 14 at 0:00
0
  1. Inverse is a better name for this operation than reverse (as in "inverse of a mathematical function")

  2. I often do this inverse transformation not only on maps but on other (including Seq) collections. I find it best not to limit the definition of my inverse operation to one-to-one maps. Here's the definition I operate with for maps (please suggest improvements to my implementation).

    def invertMap[A,B]( m: Map[A,B] ) : Map[B,List[A]] = {
      val k = ( ( m values ) toList ) distinct
      val v = k map { e => ( ( m keys ) toList ) filter { x => m(x) == e } }
      ( k zip v ) toMap
    }
    

If it's a one-to-one map, you end up with singleton lists which can be trivially tested and transformed to a Map[B,A] rather than Map[B,List[A]].

  • I edited the original question to say "invert". – Seth Tisue Jan 25 '14 at 13:36
0

We can try using this foldLeft function that will take care of collisions and invert the map in single traversal.

scala> def invertMap[A, B](inputMap: Map[A, B]): Map[B, List[A]] = {
     |     inputMap.foldLeft(Map[B, List[A]]()) {
     |       case (mapAccumulator, (value, key)) =>
     |         if (mapAccumulator.contains(key)) {
     |           mapAccumulator.updated(key, mapAccumulator(key) :+ value)
     |         } else {
     |           mapAccumulator.updated(key, List(value))
     |         }
     |     }
     |   }
invertMap: [A, B](inputMap: Map[A,B])Map[B,List[A]]

scala> val map = Map(1 -> 2, 2 -> 2, 3 -> 3, 4 -> 3, 5 -> 5)
map: scala.collection.immutable.Map[Int,Int] = Map(5 -> 5, 1 -> 2, 2 -> 2, 3 -> 3, 4 -> 3)

scala> invertMap(map)
res0: Map[Int,List[Int]] = Map(5 -> List(5), 2 -> List(1, 2), 3 -> List(3, 4))

scala> val map = Map("A" -> "A", "B" -> "A", "C" -> "C", "D" -> "C", "E" -> "E")
map: scala.collection.immutable.Map[String,String] = Map(E -> E, A -> A, B -> A, C -> C, D -> C)

scala> invertMap(map)
res1: Map[String,List[String]] = Map(E -> List(E), A -> List(A, B), C -> List(C, D))

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