295

I know the statement:

create table xyz_new as select * from xyz;

Which copies the structure and the data, but what if I just want the structure?

1

17 Answers 17

460

Just use a where clause that won't select any rows:

create table xyz_new as select * from xyz where 1=0;

Limitations

The following things will not be copied to the new table:

  • sequences
  • triggers
  • indexes
  • some constraints may not be copied
  • materialized view logs

This also does not handle partitions


14
  • 56
    This is a great, clean answer. Just want to remind that this will not include any constraints.. the new table won't even have a primary key. Oct 24, 2008 at 15:02
  • 19
    this will not replicate sequences or triggers either. Oct 24, 2008 at 17:29
  • 16
    nor will the new table have any indexes - don't get caught out trying to do a big query on the new table :-)
    – hamishmcn
    Nov 1, 2008 at 18:09
  • 8
    also doesn't handle partitions. But hey.
    – MK.
    Oct 20, 2011 at 14:38
  • 18
    Just an addendum - it will contain some constraints - i.e. any NOT NULL constraints will be copied. Aug 29, 2012 at 0:36
88

I used the method that you accepted a lot, but as someone pointed out it doesn't duplicate constraints (except for NOT NULL, I think).

A more advanced method if you want to duplicate the full structure is:

SET LONG 5000
SELECT dbms_metadata.get_ddl( 'TABLE', 'MY_TABLE_NAME' ) FROM DUAL;

This will give you the full create statement text which you can modify as you wish for creating the new table. You would have to change the names of the table and all constraints of course.

(You could also do this in older versions using EXP/IMP, but it's much easier now.)

Edited to add If the table you are after is in a different schema:

SELECT dbms_metadata.get_ddl( 'TABLE', 'MY_TABLE_NAME', 'OTHER_SCHEMA_NAME' ) FROM DUAL;
4
  • How is this command going to be modified if i want to copy from another schema .
    – HalfWebDev
    Jul 15, 2013 at 9:53
  • My_table_name is the existing table . But how do i get the name of my new table created ?
    – HalfWebDev
    Jul 18, 2013 at 11:44
  • The command in my answer doesn't create the new table; it returns the SQL you would use to recreate the original table. You modify it as desired then run it. So the name of the new table is whatever you choose to specify.
    – Dave Costa
    Jul 18, 2013 at 15:50
  • 5
    SO it must be like assigning the above sql command to a variable . ryt ? eg . new_table = dbms_metadata.get_ddl( 'TABLE', 'MY_TABLE_NAME', 'OTHER_SCHEMA_NAME' ). Meanwhile please let me know what LONG does here.
    – HalfWebDev
    Jul 18, 2013 at 16:26
17
create table xyz_new as select * from xyz where rownum = -1;

To avoid iterate again and again and insert nothing based on the condition where 1=2

1
  • For nowadays, one can also use FETCH NEXT 0 ROWS ONLY - some internet sources indicates that might be faster than rownum, but for this case, I think rather than performance I prefer the readability of FETCH sentence. More up to personal likings probably Mar 29 at 7:50
16

Using sql developer select the table and click on the DDL tab

You can use that code to create a new table with no data when you run it in a sql worksheet

sqldeveloper is a free to use app from oracle.

If the table has sequences or triggers the ddl will sometimes generate those for you too. You just have to be careful what order you make them in and know when to turn the triggers on or off.

1
  • 2
    In Oracle SQL Developer v.18.3 the tab is called SQL
    – Metafaniel
    Jan 22, 2019 at 15:07
5

You can do this Create table New_table as select * from Old_table where 1=2 ; but be careful The table you create does not have any Index, PK and so on like the old_table.

4
    DECLARE
    l_ddl   VARCHAR2 (32767);
BEGIN
    l_ddl      := REPLACE (
                      REPLACE (
                          DBMS_LOB.SUBSTR (DBMS_METADATA.get_ddl ('TABLE', 'ACTIVITY_LOG', 'OLDSCHEMA'))
                        , q'["OLDSCHEMA"]'
                        , q'["NEWSCHEMA"]'
                      )
                    , q'["OLDTABLSPACE"]'
                    , q'["NEWTABLESPACE"]'
                  );

    EXECUTE IMMEDIATE l_ddl;
END; 
1

Simply write a query like:

create table new_table as select * from old_table where 1=2;

where new_table is the name of the new table that you want to create and old_table is the name of the existing table whose structure you want to copy, this will copy only structure.

1
SELECT * INTO newtable
FROM oldtable
WHERE 1 = 0;

Create a new, empty table using the schema of another. Just add a WHERE clause that causes the query to return no data:

1

If one needs to create a table (with an empty structure) just to EXCHANGE PARTITION, it is best to use the "..FOR EXCHANGE.." clause. It's available only from Oracle version 12.2 onwards though.

CREATE TABLE t1_temp FOR EXCHANGE WITH TABLE t1;

This addresses 'ORA-14097' during the 'exchange partition' seamlessly if table structures are not exactly copied by normal CTAS operation. I have seen Oracle missing some of the "DEFAULT" column and "HIDDEN" columns definitions from the original table.

ORA-14097: column type or size mismatch in ALTER TABLE EXCHANGE PARTITION

See this for further read...

0

you can also do a

create table abc_new as select * from abc; 

then truncate the table abc_new. Hope this will suffice your requirement.

1
  • 11
    Of course, if you have a LOT of data in the original table, this could a really, really bad idea. ;)
    – Alexios
    Oct 10, 2013 at 15:28
0

Using pl/sql developer you can right click on the table_name either in the sql workspace or in the object explorer, than click on "view" and than click "view sql" which generates the sql script to create the table along with all the constraints, indexes, partitions etc..

Next you run the script using the new_table_name

0

copy without table data

create table <target_table> as select * from <source_table> where 1=2;

copy with table data

create table <target_table> as select * from <source_table>;
0

WHERE 1 = 0 or similar false conditions work, but I dislike how they look. Marginally cleaner code for Oracle 12c+ IMHO is

CREATE TABLE bar AS SELECT * FROM foo FETCH FIRST 0 ROWS ONLY;

Same limitations apply: only column definitions and their nullability are copied into a new table.

0

In other way you can get ddl of table creation from command listed below, and execute the creation.

SELECT DBMS_METADATA.GET_DDL('TYPE','OBJECT_NAME','DATA_BASE_USER') TEXT FROM DUAL 
  • TYPE is TABLE,PROCEDURE etc.

With this command you can get majority of ddl from database objects.

1
  • Note that the arguments to GET_DDL are case sensitive. Jul 17, 2019 at 16:55
-1
Create table target_table 
As
Select * 
from source_table 
where 1=2;

Source_table is the table u wanna copy the structure of.

-1
  1. create table xyz_new as select * from xyz;

-- This will create table and copy all data.

  1. delete from xyz_new;

-- This will have same table structure but all data copied will be deleted.

If you want to overcome the limitations specified by answer: How can I create a copy of an Oracle table without copying the data?

-6

The task above can be completed in two simple steps.

STEP 1:

CREATE table new_table_name AS(Select * from old_table_name);

The query above creates a duplicate of a table (with contents as well).

To get the structure, delete the contents of the table using.

STEP 2:

DELETE * FROM new_table_name.

Hope this solves your problem. And thanks to the earlier posts. Gave me a lot of insight.

1
  • 13
    This even less efficient than the truncate version. As well as allocating extents for all the data, you aren't freeing them by deleting, so you're potentially wasting space unless the table grows to the old size. And you're generating undo/redo on both the insert and delete. Jim's answer very simply avoids all of that.
    – Alex Poole
    Aug 29, 2012 at 7:05

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.