6

in c++ the norm of a complex numer c is defined as abs(c)^2 . this means its re(c)^2+im(z)^2.

this is the implementation:

template<bool>
struct _Norm_helper
{
  template<typename _Tp>
    static inline _Tp _S_do_it(const complex<_Tp>& __z)
    {
      const _Tp __x = __z.real();
      const _Tp __y = __z.imag();
      return __x * __x + __y * __y;
    }
};

template<>
struct _Norm_helper<true>
{
  template<typename _Tp>
    static inline _Tp _S_do_it(const complex<_Tp>& __z)
    {
      _Tp __res = std::abs(__z);
      return __res * __res;
    }
};

why would anyone want to use the second implementation?

the first one is clearly faster, because it doesnt use abs, where sqrt is involved.

  • 2
    the first one is clearly faster Well, did you do timing tests to verify this claim? – PaulMcKenzie Apr 30 '14 at 21:38
  • The implementation is not set by the C++ standard. Which standard library are you looking at? – juanchopanza Apr 30 '14 at 21:44
  • i found it in mingw, gcc 4.8.1, and i tested it with a standard mandelbrot. – tly Apr 30 '14 at 21:47
  • I think there is a non-abs implementation for floating point types. Look for _S_do_it. – juanchopanza Apr 30 '14 at 21:52
  • 3
    The C++ Standard requires [complex.value.ops] that it "Returns: The squared magnitude of x." So, generically, you'll have to use the second implementation, unless you can prove the first one will do the same. This of course dodges the question, which now is why did they specify it in that way? – dyp Apr 30 '14 at 22:27
3

If we will look into the implementation, we will find the answer there,

  // 26.2.7/5: norm(__z) returns the squared magnitude of __z.
  //     As defined, norm() is -not- a norm is the common mathematical
  //     sens used in numerics.  The helper class _Norm_helper<> tries to
  //     distinguish between builtin floating point and the rest, so as
  //     to deliver an answer as close as possible to the real value.
  template<bool>
    struct _Norm_helper
    {
      template<typename _Tp>
        static inline _Tp _S_do_it(const complex<_Tp>& __z)
        {
          const _Tp __x = __z.real();
          const _Tp __y = __z.imag();
          return __x * __x + __y * __y;
        }
    };

  template<>
    struct _Norm_helper<true>
    {
      template<typename _Tp>
        static inline _Tp _S_do_it(const complex<_Tp>& __z)
        {
          _Tp __res = std::abs(__z);
          return __res * __res;
        }
    };

  template<typename _Tp>
    inline _Tp
    norm(const complex<_Tp>& __z)
    {
      return _Norm_helper<__is_floating<_Tp>::__value 
         && !_GLIBCXX_FAST_MATH>::_S_do_it(__z);
    }

So the second implementation is called when norm is applied to a value of a builtin floating-point type (which is float, double, long double, or __float128 as per GCC 4.8.1) and if the -fast-math option is not set. This is done to conform with the standard definition where norm is defined as the squared magnitude of z.

Due to the rounding errors, z.real()*z.real() + z.imag()*z.imag() is not equal abs(z)*abs(z), therefore the first version will be inconsistent with the specification wording (which probably indicates that there is a problem with the specification). To make it easier to understand, why the wording matters, consider the code that expects that norm(x) / abs(x) = x. Which is, of course, a bad code, but the standard in some sense guaranteed that this should be true.

However, once FAST_MATH is set or when complex is specialized to a non-builtin type, the standard doesn't have its power anymore (since it clearly says that the behavior is undefined) and the implementation is falling to the first implementation which is arguably1 faster and more precise.


1)) it actually depends on many factors (like whether builtin intrinsics are used) and yada, yada, yada, so let's take this claim with a grain of salt.

  • Good point, but, std::complex<T> is fairly clearly defined to not be useful for T other than float, double, long double (and I may be wrong about the last one :-) ). Since the OP code only applies to complex<T>, there doesn't seem to be much point in making a provision here for a complex<USERT> and then having std::norm() work because std::abs() was supplied for that type. – greggo Jan 5 '16 at 15:12
  • Where is is defined to not be useful for other T? I can imagine lots of different implementations of real numbers, other than built-in – ivg Jan 5 '16 at 19:56
  • I can too, doesn't mean that std::complex will work for them :-) . If you trust this: en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/numeric/complex "The effect of instantiating the template complex for any other type [beyond float, double, long double] is unspecified" – greggo Jan 5 '16 at 22:46
  • This is a correct answer. It would be the perfect explanation if the generic (fallback) implementation were using std::abs; _Tp __res = abs(__z); or something like this. I don't think std::abs can be specialized/overloaded for your own types, and even if it were one might want to define abs in another namespace. Having said that, nowadays gcc (9) implements this consistently, without using the abs function. – alfC Aug 2 at 17:43
  • @alfC, you probably meant that this is an incorrect answer? I decided to look deeper five years later and dug into the implementation to find the (I believe) right answer. – ivg Aug 2 at 19:03

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