414

I have a variable of type std::string. I want to check if it contains a certain std::string. How would I do that?

Is there a function that returns true if the string is found, and false if it isn't?

  • 5
    Do you mean char* string or the string from the STL ? – anthares Feb 26 '10 at 8:23
  • 1
    It's not a char* string. I had to #include <string> to use it. – neuromancer Feb 26 '10 at 9:37
  • Some of the solutions are using s2 for the string I want to find. Will it still work if I use something like "this is a string" instead of s2? – neuromancer Feb 26 '10 at 10:38
  • 2
    Yes because there is a string literl constructor for std::string type. – Matthieu N. Feb 26 '10 at 16:15
  • 12
    Someone please make a proposal to add std::basic_string::contains to the stdlib. – emlai May 5 '16 at 19:15

10 Answers 10

602

Use std::string::find as follows:

if (s1.find(s2) != std::string::npos) {
    std::cout << "found!" << '\n';
}

Note: "found!" will be printed if s2 is a substring of s1, both s1 and s2 are of type std::string.

100

You can try using the find function:

string str ("There are two needles in this haystack.");
string str2 ("needle");

if (str.find(str2) != string::npos) {
//.. found.
} 
21

Actually, you can try to use boost library,I think std::string doesn't supply enough method to do all the common string operation.In boost,you can just use the boost::algorithm::contains:

#include "string"

#include "boost/algorithm/string.hpp"

using namespace std;
using namespace boost;
int main(){
    string s("gengjiawen");
    string t("geng");
    bool b = contains(s, t);
    cout << b << endl;
    return 0;
}
  • 24
    "I think std::string doesn't supply enough method to do all the common string operation". But there's a find method for exactly the task in question. No need to introduce a library dependency. – stefan Jun 23 '14 at 6:35
  • 7
    @stefan ,you are right,there is a find method,but what about split,replace and many other staff.You can compare std::string to the string api in Java.PS:Also I do think contains is much more elegant than find to check if a string contains another string. – Geng Jiawen Jun 23 '14 at 8:01
  • Also this is short, and more easy to memory. Cpp 17 has add support for filesystem. I hope Cpp 2x will do something for string too. It's very painful lack basic string method support in modern cpp. – Geng Jiawen May 15 at 3:28
10

You can try this

string s1 = "Hello";
string s2 = "el";
if(strstr(s1.c_str(),s2.c_str()))
{
   cout << " S1 Contains S2";
}
3

If you don't want to use standard library functions, below is one solution.

#include <iostream>
#include <string>

bool CheckSubstring(std::string firstString, std::string secondString){
    if(secondString.size() > firstString.size())
        return false;

    for (int i = 0; i < firstString.size(); i++){
        int j = 0;
        // If the first characters match
        if(firstString[i] == secondString[j]){
            int k = i;
            while (firstString[i] == secondString[j] && j < secondString.size()){
                j++;
                i++;
            }
            if (j == secondString.size())
                return true;
            else // Re-initialize i to its original value
                i = k;
        }
    }
    return false;
}

int main(){
    std::string firstString, secondString;

    std::cout << "Enter first string:";
    std::getline(std::cin, firstString);

    std::cout << "Enter second string:";
    std::getline(std::cin, secondString);

    if(CheckSubstring(firstString, secondString))
        std::cout << "Second string is a substring of the frist string.\n";
    else
        std::cout << "Second string is not a substring of the first string.\n";

    return 0;
}
  • 4
    You are already using std::string, hence your code already depends on std lib. I rly do not see any reason why to avoid the accepted solution using std::string::find. – b00n12 Mar 29 '18 at 12:22
  • Yeah, that's a good point. Didn't think that when I wrote this. I guess what I thought when I wrote this was maybe how to just avoid using std::find. – Testing123 Mar 30 '18 at 1:01
  • 2
    Just for future visitors: This algorithm isn't actually correct. Because "i" never goes back after a failed substring match, some cases are not matched, for example consider: aaabc, aab – sAm_vdP Oct 22 '18 at 14:16
  • Thanks for pointing it out! Edited. – Testing123 Oct 22 '18 at 15:42
  • This has several bugs. CheckSubstring(std::string firstString, std::string secondString) deep copies both the strings passed to the function, which is expensive, particularly for longer strings that necessitate heap allocations. Further, say you call CheckSubstring("XYZab", "ab\0\0") - the while loop will end up comparing a to a, b to b, the implicit NUL at the end of the first string to the explicit NUL in the second, then it will read beyond the first string's buffer, having undefined behaviour. To fix use for (... i <= firstString.size() - secondString().size(); ...)`. – Tony Delroy May 9 at 7:09
-1
#include <algorithm>        // std::search
#include <string>
using std::search; using std::count; using std::string;

int main() {
    string mystring = "The needle in the haystack";
    string str = "needle";
    string::const_iterator it;
    it = search(mystring.begin(), mystring.end(), 
                str.begin(), str.end()) != mystring.end();

    // if string is found... returns iterator to str's first element in mystring
    // if string is not found... returns iterator to mystring.end()

if (it != mystring.end())
    // string is found
else
    // not found

return 0;
}
-1

From so many answers in this website I didn't find out a clear answer so in 5-10 minutes I figured it out the answer myself. But this can be done in two cases:

  1. Either you KNOW the position of the sub-string you search for in the string
  2. Either you don't know the position and search for it, char by char...

So, let's assume we search for the substring "cd" in the string "abcde", and we use the simplest substr built-in function in C++

for 1:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>

    using namespace std;
int i;

int main()
{
    string a = "abcde";
    string b = a.substr(2,2);    // 2 will be c. Why? because we start counting from 0 in a string, not from 1.

    cout << "substring of a is: " << b << endl;
    return 0;
}

for 2:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>

using namespace std;
int i;

int main()
{
    string a = "abcde";

    for (i=0;i<a.length(); i++)
    {
        if (a.substr(i,2) == "cd")
        {
        cout << "substring of a is: " << a.substr(i,2) << endl;    // i will iterate from 0 to 5 and will display the substring only when the condition is fullfilled 
        }
    }
    return 0;
}
-1

You can also use the System namespace. Then you can use the contains method.

#include <iostream>
using namespace System;

int main(){
    String ^ wholeString = "My name is Malindu";

    if(wholeString->ToLower()->Contains("malindu")){
        std::cout<<"Found";
    }
    else{
        std::cout<<"Not Found";
    }
}
  • This answer only applies to Microsoft's proprietary C++ extension either C++/CX or C++/CLI – H. Al-Amri Jun 3 at 13:32
  • yeah, I am sorry, I didn't know it only works that way until somedays after I post it. – Malindu Dilanka Jun 8 at 14:59
-2

This is a simple function

bool find(string line, string sWord)
{
    bool flag = false;
    int index = 0, i, helper = 0;
    for (i = 0; i < line.size(); i++)
    {
        if (sWord.at(index) == line.at(i))
        {
            if (flag == false)
            {
                flag = true;
                helper = i;
            }
            index++;
        }
        else
        {
            flag = false;
            index = 0;
        }
        if (index == sWord.size())
        {
            break;
        }
    }
    if ((i+1-helper) == index)
    {
        return true;
    }
    return false;
}
  • 3
    Hello, welcome to SO. Could you please edit your answer and add a commentary on how it works and how it differs from other answers? Thank you! – Fabio Turati Mar 27 '17 at 16:45
-3

We can use this method instead. Just an example from my projects. Refer the code. Some extras are also included.

Look to the if statements!

/*
Every C++ program should have an entry point. Usually, this is the main function.
Every C++ Statement ends with a ';' (semi-colon)
But, pre-processor statements do not have ';'s at end.
Also, every console program can be ended using "cin.get();" statement, so that the console won't exit instantly.
*/

#include <string>
#include <bits/stdc++.h> //Can Use instead of iostream. Also should be included to use the transform function.

using namespace std;
int main(){ //The main function. This runs first in every program.

    string input;

    while(input!="exit"){
        cin>>input;
        transform(input.begin(),input.end(),input.begin(),::tolower); //Converts to lowercase.

        if(input.find("name") != std::string::npos){ //Gets a boolean value regarding the availability of the said text.
            cout<<"My Name is AI \n";
        }

        if(input.find("age") != std::string::npos){
            cout<<"My Age is 2 minutes \n";
        }
    }

}
  • I'm sorry, I did not see that somebody has posted the same thing I did previously. – Malindu Dilanka Jun 8 at 15:07
  • "Subscribe to me on YouTube" can be considered spam. Please keep that in mind in the future. Also, read How to Answer and how not to be a spammer – Zoe Jun 8 at 16:23

protected by Zoe Jun 8 at 16:23

Thank you for your interest in this question. Because it has attracted low-quality or spam answers that had to be removed, posting an answer now requires 10 reputation on this site (the association bonus does not count).

Would you like to answer one of these unanswered questions instead?

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.