12

Java 8 has a number of Optional classes, like OptionalDouble, OptionalInt, OptionalLong.

Is there a nice way of operating with Optional values of the same kind? That is, I'd like to be able to do:

OptionalDouble d1 = OptionalDouble.of(1.);
OptionalDouble d2 = OptionalDouble.of(2.);
OptionalDouble d3 = OptionalDouble.of(3.);

OptionalDouble result = d1.add(d2).multiply(d3);

And of course if any of them are "empty" the result should be empty. After googling around a bit I found a few code samples where people are using those functions (e.g. add) but it's not the part of the API (anymore?).

3

Weird. The reference Optional has a map method which you could use do something similar to what you want, but it appears to be absent from the primitive optionals. I believe your only recourse currently is to use OptionalDouble::isPresent or OptionalDouble::ifPresent.

Or you could define your own helper add methods or define your own OptionalDouble class to include those methods.

5
  • 2
    Optional#Map appears to need a Function, not a BinaryOperator, so it would only work with functions that operate on one value, not things like add or multiply. – ajb May 1 '14 at 19:30
  • I've been using a helper method but I don't really understand the reason why they omitted these methods, or at least the ability to add them. Notice that the Optional classes for primitives like OptionalDouble are final so they can't even be extended. – siki May 1 '14 at 19:35
  • 1
    @siki They are final because optionals are immutable classes and hence should never be extended, as you cannot guarantee immutability anymore then if a method takes an OptionalDouble as parameter. – skiwi May 1 '14 at 19:39
  • 1
    @ajb I said something similar. IE: Optional<Double> opt = ...; opt = opt.map(d -> d * 2); – Jeffrey May 1 '14 at 19:44
  • @siki They can't be extended, but you could make your own separate implementation and provide methods to convert from one to the other. It's not the cleanest of solutions, but it would work. – Jeffrey May 1 '14 at 19:45
3

You could make your own implementation that encapsulates an OptionalDouble, a very important thing here to consider is that your encapsulating class should be immutable to prevent confusion as OptionalDouble itself is immutable.

An own implementation is preferred over static method for readability.

I went ahead and created my own, with the most basic behaviour as possible:

public class OptionalDoubleImproved {
    private static final OptionalDoubleImproved EMPTY = OptionalDoubleImproved.of(OptionalDouble.empty());

    private final OptionalDouble optionalDouble;

    private OptionalDoubleImproved(final OptionalDouble optionalDouble) {
        this.optionalDouble = Objects.requireNonNull(optionalDouble);
    }

    public static OptionalDoubleImproved of(final OptionalDouble optionalDouble) {
        return new OptionalDoubleImproved(optionalDouble);
    }

    public OptionalDoubleImproved applyFunction(final DoubleBinaryOperator operator, final OptionalDouble operand) {
        Objects.requireNonNull(operator);
        Objects.requireNonNull(operand);
        if (!optionalDouble.isPresent() || !operand.isPresent()) {
            return EMPTY;
        }
        return OptionalDoubleImproved.of(OptionalDouble.of(operator.applyAsDouble(optionalDouble.getAsDouble(), operand.getAsDouble())));
    }

    public OptionalDouble get() {
        return optionalDouble;
    }

    @Override
    public int hashCode() {
        int hash = 7;
        hash = 53 * hash + Objects.hashCode(this.optionalDouble);
        return hash;
    }

    @Override
    public boolean equals(Object obj) {
        if (obj == null) {
            return false;
        }
        if (getClass() != obj.getClass()) {
            return false;
        }
        final OptionalDoubleImproved other = (OptionalDoubleImproved) obj;
        if (!Objects.equals(this.optionalDouble, other.optionalDouble)) {
            return false;
        }
        return true;
    }

    @Override
    public String toString() {
        return "OptionalDoubleImproved[" + optionalDouble + "]";
    }
}

Which can then be used as:

OptionalDouble d1 = OptionalDouble.of(1.);
OptionalDouble d2 = OptionalDouble.of(2.);
OptionalDouble d3 = OptionalDouble.of(3.);

OptionalDouble result = OptionalDoubleImproved.of(d1)
        .applyFunction((a, b) -> a + b, d2)
        .applyFunction((a, b) -> a * b, d3)
        .get();
3

The main purpose of Optional is to represent a function's return value that might be absent.

The point of having primitive specializations of streams is to avoid boxing/unboxing overhead. With OptionalInt and friends there's an unavoidable level of boxing (which would be worse if they didn't exist, as the alternative would be Optional<Integer>), but the intent is for whoever processes the return value to unbox it immediately (or provide a default or throw an exception if it's absent) and then deal with actual primitives from then on.

Supporting all the additional APIs to do arithmetic, comparisons etc. on optional primitives would add even more API bloat. Using it would lead to cluttered, slow code, quite a disadvantage compared to the perfectly fine arithmetic expression syntax that already exists in Java. In short, adding a bunch of operations on optional primitives wasn't considered useful.

2

I would use plain double

double d1 = 1, d2 = 2, d3 = 3;
if (condition)
    d1 = Double.NaN;
double result = (d1 + d2) * d3; // if any double is NaN, the result is NaN

Not only is the faster and shorter, it is also simpler.

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