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I wanted to ask.We say that using --ptxas-options=-v doesn't give the exact number of registers that our program uses.

1) Then , how am I going to supply the occupancu calculator with registers per thread and shared memory per block?

2) In my program I use also thrust calls which generate ptx code.I am having 2 kernels but I can see the thrust functions to produce ptx as well.So , I am taking into account these numbers also when I am counting the total number of registers I use? (I think yes!) (the same applies for the shared memory)

  • You are going to have to explain that first paragraph. Who is "we", and where do they say that the ptxas verbose output isn't exact? – talonmies May 2 '14 at 16:36
  • @talonmies:I mean , I saw some posts saying the output of ptx is not the number of registers used by the kernel.For example stackoverflow.com/questions/11483321/… – George May 2 '14 at 18:32
  • You might have seen it, but you clearly didn't read it. That question you linked to is asking why ptxas output doesn't agree with someones guess of how many registers a kernel would require based on looking at the PTX. Completely irrelevant to your question..... – talonmies May 2 '14 at 19:28
  • @talonmies:From stackoverflow.com/questions/16975727/… " So the number of registers one sees used in PTX code has no significance, since these are virtual registers:.And some other similar posts – George May 2 '14 at 19:45
  • Right: PTX code. That isn't the same as what is emitted by ptxas which is a PTX assembler, ie. it compiles PTX code into the final executable. Like I said: read. – talonmies May 2 '14 at 20:25
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1) Then , how am I going to supply the occupancy calculator with registers per thread and shared memory per block?

The only other thing needed should be rounding up (if necessary) the output of ptxas to an even granularity of register allocation, which varies by device (see Greg's answer here) I think the common register allocation granularities are 4 and 8, but I don't have a table of register allocation granularity by compute capability.

I think shared memory also has an allocation granularity. Since the max number of threadblocks per SM is limited anyway, this should only matter (for occupancy) if your allocation/usage is within a granular amount of exceeding the limit for however many blocks you are otherwise limited to.

I think in most cases you'll get a pretty good feel by using the numbers from ptxas without rounding. If you feel you need this level of accuracy in the occupancy calculator, asking a nice directed question like "what are the allocation granularities for registers and shared memory for various GPUs" may get someone like Greg to give you a crisp answer.

2) In my program I use also thrust calls which generate ptx code.I am having 2 kernels but I can see the thrust functions to produce ptx as well.So , I am taking into account these numbers also when I am counting the total number of registers I use? (I think yes!) (the same applies for the shared memory)

Fundamentally I believe this thinking is incorrect. The only place I could see where it might matter is if you are running concurrent kernels, and I doubt that is the case since you mention thrust. The only figures that matter for occupancy are the metrics for a single kernel launch. You do not add threads, or registers, or shared memory across different kernels, to calculate resource usage. When a kernel completes execution, it releases its resource usage, at least for these resource types (registers, shared memory, threads).

  • :When you say rounding up to an even granularity ,what do you mean in practise?Can you provide an example assuming granularity of 4?And ,in the second question , ok I understand what you said ,each kernel has its resources usage ,but then how can I measure the performance of my program since it uses different kernels and also thrust calls which are kernels themselves?Thank you! – George May 2 '14 at 18:30
  • Rounding up: If the granularity is 4, and I get a register usage of 9 from ptxas, I would round up to 12 (the next even multiple of 4). If I get a register usage of 8, no need to round up. 8 is already an even multiple of 4. "How can I measure the performance of my program" is an involved question and not suitable for SO by itself in my opinion. It's much too broad. If you have a specific, focused question about performance analysis of a CUDA or CUDA/thrust program, please post a new SO question. This SO question really has nothing to do with measuring performance. – Robert Crovella May 2 '14 at 19:08
  • :Ok , now it is clear about the granularity.So, when I am researching occupancy , resources usage etc I do it for every kernel.Ok, thanks – George May 2 '14 at 19:13

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