335

In Typescript, this shows an error saying isNaN accepts only numeric values

isNaN('9BX46B6A')

and this returns false because parseFloat('9BX46B6A') evaluates to 9

isNaN(parseFloat('9BX46B6A'))

I can still run with the error showing up in Visual Studio, but I would like to do it the right way.

Currently, I have written this modified function -

static isNaNModified = (inputStr: string) => {
    var numericRepr = parseFloat(inputStr);
    return isNaN(numericRepr) || numericRepr.toString().length != inputStr.length;
}
3

18 Answers 18

579

The way to convert a string to a number is with Number, not parseFloat.

Number('1234') // 1234
Number('9BX9') // NaN

You can also use the unary plus operator if you like shorthand:

+'1234' // 1234
+'9BX9' // NaN

Be careful when checking against NaN (the operator === and !== don't work as expected with NaN). Use:

 isNaN(+maybeNumber) // returns true if NaN, otherwise false
13
  • 26
    does that mean that doing this: if (isNaN(+possibleNumberString)) is a valid way of checking? Commented Feb 12, 2016 at 10:30
  • 10
    Why would you use Number above parseInt or parseFloat? Number('') gives 0 while parseInt('') gives NaN which is more in line to what I expect.
    – Didii
    Commented Oct 27, 2017 at 14:48
  • 16
    As mentioned in the original question, parseInt('9BX9') (and parseFloat('9BX9')) will return 9, not NaN. If you don’t want the conversion of an empty string to 0, check explicitly for empty string first.
    – C Snover
    Commented Oct 28, 2017 at 0:11
  • 2
    If you want to check for it, use isNaN(Number(what_ever)) instead of Number(what_ever) === Nan.
    – k0pernikus
    Commented Feb 13, 2018 at 14:15
  • 3
    @sauntimo Number is not a TypeScript thing, it is a built-in EcmaScript constructor function which accepts a value and returns a number primitive when called as a function rather than a constructor.
    – C Snover
    Commented Jan 18, 2019 at 0:43
76
function isNumber(value?: string | number): boolean
{
   return ((value != null) &&
           (value !== '') &&
           !isNaN(Number(value.toString())));
}
2
  • If value is undefined, won't this throw an exception when trying to call toString() on it?
    – LCIII
    Commented Jul 21, 2021 at 18:24
  • 2
    @LCIII - if the value is undefined then value != null is false, so the if statement (in the return) will not pass the first line of code. Because there is an && between the if lines Commented Jul 22, 2021 at 9:07
59

Update

This method is no longer available in rxjs v6


I'm solved it by using the isNumeric operator from rxjs library (importing rxjs/util/isNumeric

import { isNumeric } from 'rxjs/util/isNumeric';

. . .

var val = "5700";
if (isNumeric(val)){
   alert("it is number !");
}
3
18

My simple solution here is:

const isNumeric = (val: string) : boolean => {
   return !isNaN(Number(val));
}

// isNumberic("2") => true
// isNumeric("hi") => false;
4
  • 2
    This will consider space, empty etc as number Commented Feb 9, 2022 at 12:34
  • 1
    This doesn't work because if any number is included in the string, it will be interpreted as a number. Commented Apr 18, 2022 at 20:45
  • Those cases does not work: Number("") ==0 Number(null)== 0 Number(true)==1 Number(Infinity)==Infinity Number([])==0 Commented Apr 22, 2022 at 19:32
  • This is useful in cases where you just need to check whether "casting" to number will succeed, and considering whitespace as "0", which is exactly what I needed. Commented Nov 5, 2022 at 13:51
16

You can use the Number.isFinite() function:

Number.isFinite(Infinity);  // false
Number.isFinite(NaN);       // false
Number.isFinite(-Infinity); // false
Number.isFinite('0');       // false
Number.isFinite(null);      // false

Number.isFinite(0);         // true
Number.isFinite(2e64);      // true

Note: there's a significant difference between the global function isFinite() and the latter Number.isFinite(). In the case of the former, string coercion is performed - so isFinite('0') === true whilst Number.isFinite('0') === false.

Also, note that this is not available in IE!

2
  • 1
    But...TS2345: Argument of type '"1"' is not assignable to parameter of type 'number'. It it needs to be Number.isFinite(Number('0'));
    – Mcgri
    Commented Jun 7, 2020 at 9:49
  • This answer doesn't seem like it is answering the question. They asked if a string is Numeric, but the function you are suggesting that they use Number.isFinite will always return false for every string, even if that string is numeric. The answer could be salvaged if you rewrite it to use the global isFinite instead
    – zoran404
    Commented Jan 3 at 5:10
9

I would choose an existing and already tested solution. For example this from rxjs in typescript:

function isNumeric(val: any): val is number | string {
  // parseFloat NaNs numeric-cast false positives (null|true|false|"")
  // ...but misinterprets leading-number strings, particularly hex literals ("0x...")
  // subtraction forces infinities to NaN
  // adding 1 corrects loss of precision from parseFloat (#15100)
  return !isArray(val) && (val - parseFloat(val) + 1) >= 0;
}

rxjs/isNumeric.ts

Without rxjs isArray() function and with simplefied typings:

function isNumeric(val: any): boolean {
  return !(val instanceof Array) && (val - parseFloat(val) + 1) >= 0;
}

You should always test such functions with your use cases. If you have special value types, this function may not be your solution. You can test the function here.

Results are:

enum         : CardTypes.Debit   : true
decimal      : 10                : true
hexaDecimal  : 0xf10b            : true
binary       : 0b110100          : true
octal        : 0o410             : true
stringNumber : '10'              : true

string       : 'Hello'           : false
undefined    : undefined         : false
null         : null              : false
function     : () => {}          : false
array        : [80, 85, 75]      : false
turple       : ['Kunal', 2018]   : false
object       : {}                : false

As you can see, you have to be careful, if you use this function with enums.

1
  • 1
    Typescript calls this a "type guard"
    – serg06
    Commented Jul 15, 2021 at 18:44
9

Simple answer: (watch for blank & null)

isNaN(+'111') = false;
isNaN(+'111r') = true;
isNaN(+'r') = true;
isNaN(+'') = false;   
isNaN(null) = false;   

https://codepen.io/CQCoder/pen/zYGEjxd?editors=1111

5

Considering that your variable could be string or number or any type - for full numbers (non-floats) in Angular/Typescript you can use:

var isFullNumber: boolean = 
    Number.isInteger(Number(yourVariable)) && yourVariable !== null;

Edited as pointed out by @tarrbal - we CANNOT use just:

Number.isInteger(yourVariable);

To prove check out these 3 tests:

let testVariables = [0, 1, "0", "1", "A", {}, -3, 0.1, NaN, null, undefined]; 

let isFullNumber: boolean;
let ix: number = 1;
testVariables.forEach(v => {
isFullNumber = Number.isInteger(v);                         // <---
console.log(ix++, ': ', v, isFullNumber);
})

console.log('--------------');

ix = 1;
testVariables.forEach(v => {
isFullNumber = Number.isInteger(Number(v));                 // <---
console.log(ix++, ': ', v, isFullNumber);
})

console.log('--------------');
ix = 1;
testVariables.forEach(v => {
isFullNumber = Number.isInteger(Number(v)) && v !== null;   // <---
console.log(ix++, ': ', v, isFullNumber);
})

and these 3 results:

1   :       0           true
2   :       1           true
3   :       0           false <- would expect true
4   :       1           false <- would expect true
5   :       A           false
6   :       {}          false
7   :       -3          true
8   :       0.1         false
9   :       NaN         false
10  :       null        false
11  :       undefined   false
----------------------------
1   :       0           true
2   :       1           true
3   :       0           true
4   :       1           true
5   :       A           false
6   :       {}          false
7   :       -3          true
8   :       0.1         false
9   :       NaN         false
10  :       null        true <- would expect false
11  :       undefined   false
----------------------------
1   :       0           true
2   :       1           true
3   :       0           true
4   :       1           true
5   :       A           false
6   :       {}          false
7   :       -3          true
8   :       0.1         false
9   :       NaN         false
10  :       null        false
11  :       undefined   false
1
  • 4
    Number.isInteger just tells you if yourVariable, which is already a number type, is an integer. Does not work with strings. So, Number.isInteger(Number(yourVariable)) might do the trick.
    – tarrball
    Commented Feb 18, 2020 at 13:09
3

Most of the time the value that we want to check is string or number, so here is function that i use:

const isNumber = (n: string | number): boolean => 
    !isNaN(parseFloat(String(n))) && isFinite(Number(n));

Codesandbox tests.

const willBeTrue = [0.1, '1', '-1', 1, -1, 0, -0, '0', "-0", 2e2, 1e23, 1.1, -0.1, '0.1', '2e2', '1e23', '-0.1', ' 898', '080']

const willBeFalse = ['9BX46B6A', "+''", '', '-0,1', [], '123a', 'a', 'NaN', 1e10000, undefined, null, NaN, Infinity, () => {}]
0
3

here's my trusty isNumber function. use it wisely

function isNumber(numStr: string) {
  return !isNaN(parseFloat(numStr)) && !isNaN(+numStr)
}

tests

it("test valid isNumber", () => {
  expect(isNumber("0")).toEqual(true)
  expect(isNumber("-1")).toEqual(true)
})

it("test invalid isNumber", () => {
  expect(isNumber('" 1000 "')).toEqual(false)
  expect(isNumber('" 100,00.00 "')).toEqual(false)
  expect(isNumber("100,00.00")).toEqual(false)
  expect(isNumber("")).toEqual(false)
  expect(isNumber(null as any as string)).toEqual(false)
  expect(isNumber("abc")).toEqual(false)
  expect(isNumber("10%")).toEqual(false)
  expect(isNumber("#10")).toEqual(false)
  expect(isNumber("2^10")).toEqual(false)
  expect(isNumber("2!")).toEqual(false)
  expect(isNumber("(10)")).toEqual(false)
  expect(isNumber("10px")).toEqual(false)
})
1
  • isNumber('4') return // true; this is wrong Commented Dec 13, 2023 at 3:20
2

Scrolled through each answer and was surprised that this simple one-liner wasn't presented yet:

const isNumber = (val: string | number) => !!(val || val === 0) && !isNaN(Number(val.toString()));
1
  • Doesn't work with "3e44"
    – Korayem
    Commented Jul 9, 2022 at 10:24
1

My solution:

 function isNumeric(val: unknown): val is string | number {
  return (
    !isNaN(Number(Number.parseFloat(String(val)))) &&
    isFinite(Number(val))
  );
}
// true
isNumeric("-10");
isNumeric("0");
isNumeric("0xff");
isNumeric("0xFF");
isNumeric("8e5");
isNumeric("3.1415");
isNumeric("+10");
isNumeric("144");
isNumeric("5");

// false
isNumeric("-0x42");
isNumeric("7.2acdgs");
isNumeric("");
isNumeric({});
isNumeric(NaN);
isNumeric(null);
isNumeric(true);
isNumeric(Infinity);
isNumeric(undefined);
isNumeric([]);
isNumeric("some string");
1
  • Doesn't work with "3e44"
    – Korayem
    Commented Jul 9, 2022 at 10:23
1

You could use a regex to match a numeric string like this:

const RE = /^(?:[+-]?(?=\.\d|\d)(?:\d+)?(?:\.?\d*)(?:[eE][+-]?\d+)?)$/

function isNumericString(str) {
  return RE.test(str)
}
0
 const isNumeric = (value: string): boolean =>
  !new RegExp(/[^\d]/g).test(value.trim());

If you want to allow decimal point

   const isNumeric = (value: string): boolean =>
      !new RegExp(/[^\d.]/g).test(value.trim());
1
  • Warning, this will not work negative numbers. console.log( isNumeric("-123")); // false Commented Jul 19, 2022 at 9:16
0

This works for special cases, e.g. nulls

if(!isNaN(yourValue) && yourValue !== true && yourValue !== false) {
    // then it's a number
} else {
    // then it's not a number
}
0

Here's typed version for utils, or sth

export const isNumber = (value: unknown): value is number =>
  Number.isFinite(value);
1
  • 1
    Read the question again. The title may be confusing, because it mentions TypeScript, but the question is actually about regular JavaScript. They ask about checking values of a string, not about checking the type of a variable. Your function Number.isFinite will return false for every string. And your return type value is number is not relevant here, because we want to check if the string is numeric or not. And even in your own use case it wont work since it will return false when the value is Infinity and the type of Infinity is number.
    – zoran404
    Commented Jan 3 at 4:57
-3

if var sum=0; var x;

then, what about this? sum+=(x|0);

1
  • 3
    How does that answer OP's question How to check if a string is Numeric? Please explain.
    – Eric Aya
    Commented Feb 3, 2021 at 13:33
-6

Whether a string can be parsed as a number is a runtime concern. Typescript does not support this use case as it is focused on compile time (not runtime) safety.

1
  • 11
    It's enough of a concern to mark it as an error, as if to suggest it's not correct.
    – Jane Panda
    Commented Feb 10, 2017 at 4:38

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