15

My data is in a data.frame format like this sample data:

data <- 
structure(list(Article = structure(c(1L, 1L, 3L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 
1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 2L, 1L, 2L, 1L, 2L, 1L
), .Label = c("10004", "10006", "10007"), class = "factor"), 
Demand = c(26L, 780L, 2L, 181L, 228L, 214L, 219L, 291L, 104L, 
72L, 155L, 237L, 182L, 148L, 52L, 227L, 2L, 355L, 2L, 432L, 
1L, 156L), Week = c("2013-W01", "2013-W01", "2013-W01", "2013-W01", 
"2013-W01", "2013-W02", "2013-W02", "2013-W02", "2013-W02", 
"2013-W02", "2013-W03", "2013-W03", "2013-W03", "2013-W03", 
"2013-W03", "2013-W04", "2013-W04", "2013-W04", "2013-W04", 
"2013-W04", "2013-W04", "2013-W04")), .Names = c("Article", 
"Demand", "Week"), class = "data.frame", row.names = c(NA, -22L))

I would like to summarize the demand column by week and article. To do this, I use:

library(dplyr)
WeekSums <- 
  data %>%
   group_by(Article, Week) %>%
   summarize(
    WeekDemand = sum(Demand)
   )

But because some articles were not sold in certain weeks, the number of rows per article differs (only weeks with sales are shown in the WeekSums dataframe). How could I adjust my data so that each article has the same number of rows (one for each week), including weeks with 0 demand?

The output should then look like this:

  Article     Week WeekDemand
1   10004 2013-W01       1215
2   10004 2013-W02        900
3   10004 2013-W03        774
4   10004 2013-W04       1170
5   10006 2013-W01        0
6   10006 2013-W02        0
7   10006 2013-W03        0
8   10006 2013-W04         5
9   10007 2013-W01         2
10   10007 2013-W02        0
11   10007 2013-W03        0
12   10007 2013-W04        0

I tried

WeekSums %>%
  group_by(Article) %>%
  if(n()< 4) rep(rbind(c(Article,NA,NA)), 4 - n() )

but this doesn’t work. In my original approach, I resolved this problem by merging a dataframe of week numbers 1-4 with my rawdata file for each article. That way, I got 4 weeks (rows) per article, but the implementation with a for loop is very inefficient and so I’m trying to do the same with dplyr (or any other more efficient package/function). Any suggestions would be much appreciated!

0

4 Answers 4

15

Without dplyr it can be done like this:

as.data.frame(xtabs(Demand ~ Week + Article, data))

giving:

       Week Article Freq
1  2013-W01   10004 1215
2  2013-W02   10004  900
3  2013-W03   10004  774
4  2013-W04   10004 1170
5  2013-W01   10006    0
6  2013-W02   10006    0
7  2013-W03   10006    0
8  2013-W04   10006    5
9  2013-W01   10007    2
10 2013-W02   10007    0
11 2013-W03   10007    0
12 2013-W04   10007    0

and this can be rewritten as a magrittr or dplyr pipeline like this:

data %>% xtabs(formula = Demand ~ Week + Article) %>% as.data.frame()

The as.data.frame() at the end could be omitted if a wide form solution were desired.

1
  • xtabs with the indicated formula creates an object of class "table" whose dimensions are the right hand side variables and whose cells are the sum of the left hand side variable or zero if that cell is empty. as.data.frame when applied to a table reshapes it into long form. May 4, 2014 at 1:15
13

Since dplyr is under active development, I thought I would post an update that also incorporates tidyr:

library(dplyr)
library(tidyr)

data %>%
  expand(Article, Week) %>%
  left_join(data) %>%
  group_by(Article, Week) %>%
  summarise(WeekDemand = sum(Demand, na.rm=TRUE))

Which produces:

   Article     Week WeekDemand
1    10004 2013-W01       1215
2    10004 2013-W02        900
3    10004 2013-W03        774
4    10004 2013-W04       1170
5    10006 2013-W01          0
6    10006 2013-W02          0
7    10006 2013-W03          0
8    10006 2013-W04          5
9    10007 2013-W01          2
10   10007 2013-W02          0
11   10007 2013-W03          0
12   10007 2013-W04          0

Using tidyr >= 0.3.1 this can now be written as:

data %>% 
  complete(Article, Week) %>%  
  group_by(Article, Week) %>% 
  summarise(Demand = sum(Demand, na.rm = TRUE))
1
  • Thanks for demonstrating another approach to the problem! I have to admit I like the simplicity of the xtabs solution but this also produces the desired result (+1)
    – talat
    Apr 8, 2015 at 18:26
3

I thought I would provide a dplyr-esque solution.

  • use expand.grid() to generate the pair-wise combinations you are looking for.
  • use left_join() to join in the demand data (filling the rest with NAs).

Solution:

full_data <- expand.grid(Article=data$Article,Week=data$Week)
out <- left_join(tbl_dt(full_data),data)
out[is.na(out)] <- 0    # fill with zeroes for summarise below.

Then as before:

WeekSums <- out %>%
            group_by(Article, Week) %>%
            summarise(
                     WeekDemand = sum(Demand)
                     )

Fxnal programming?

If you use this transformation often then perhaps a convenience function:

xpand <- function(df, col1, col2,na_to_zero=TRUE){

    require(dplyr)

    # to substitute in the names "as is" need substitute then eval.
    xpand_call <- substitute(     
        expanded <- df %>%
                    select(col1,col2) %>%
                    expand.grid()
    )

    eval(xpand_call)                       

    out <- left_join(tbl_dt(expanded), df)         # join in any other variables from df.

    if(na_to_zero) out[is.na(out)] <- 0    # convert NAs to zeroes?

    return(out)
}

This way you can do:

expanded_df <- xpand(df,Article,Week)
0
2

For this situation you can also use dcast and melt.

   library(dplyr)
   library(reshape2)
   data %>%
      dcast(Article ~ Week, value.var = "Demand", fun.aggregate = sum) %>%
      melt(id = "Article") %>%
      arrange(Article, variable)
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