98

I'm trying to have some Go object implement io.Writer, but writes to a string instead of a file or file-like object. I thought bytes.Buffer would work since it implements Write(p []byte). However when I try this:

import "bufio"
import "bytes"

func main() {
    var b bytes.Buffer
    foo := bufio.NewWriter(b)
}

I get the following error:

cannot use b (type bytes.Buffer) as type io.Writer in function argument:
bytes.Buffer does not implement io.Writer (Write method has pointer receiver)

I am confused, since it clearly implements the interface. How do I resolve this error?

  • 2
    I've run into this problem at least twice, and Googling for a solution was really unhelpful. – Kevin Burke May 4 '14 at 12:52
  • 11
    Note that the creation of a bufio is not necessary. Just use &b as a io.Writer – Vivien Aug 14 '15 at 21:31
153

Pass a pointer to the buffer, instead of the buffer itself:

import "bufio"
import "bytes"

func main() {
    var b bytes.Buffer
    foo := bufio.NewWriter(&b)
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 4
    I ran into this and would be interested in learning why that is the case. I'm pretty unfamiliar with pointers in Go. – hourback Oct 14 '14 at 20:00
  • 1
    Thanks Kevin, this simple mistake took an hour of my time until I googled this. :) – Nelo Mitranim Nov 16 '14 at 11:32
  • 7
    @hourback it has to do with the way the interface is implemented. There's actually to ways to implement an interface in Go. Either with value or pointer receivers. I think this is a really peculiar twist to Go. If the interface is implemented using value receivers either way is OK but if the interface is implemented using pointer receivers you have to pass a pointer to the value if you intend to use the interface. It makes sense since the writer has to mutate the buffer to keep track of where it's writer head. – John Leidegren Aug 18 '16 at 7:57
23
package main

import "bytes"
import "io"

func main() {
    var b bytes.Buffer
    _ = io.Writer(&b)
}

You don't need use "bufio.NewWriter(&b)" to create an io.Writer. &b is an io.Writer itself.

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  • This should be the right answer. If you try to create a new writer out of the buffer, you won't be able to fetch the buffer Bytes directly, which makes things much more complicated. – onetwopunch Aug 17 at 13:41
8

Just use

foo := bufio.NewWriter(&b)

Because the way bytes.Buffer implements io.Writer is

func (b *Buffer) Write(p []byte) (n int, err error) {
    ...
}
// io.Writer definition
type Writer interface {
    Write(p []byte) (n int, err error)
}

It's b *Buffer, not b Buffer. (I also think it is weird for we can call a method by a variable or its pointer, but we can't assign a pointer to a non-pointer type variable.)

Besides, the compiler prompt is not clear enough:

bytes.Buffer does not implement io.Writer (Write method has pointer receiver)


Some ideas, Go use Passed by value, if we pass b to buffio.NewWriter(), in NewWriter(), it is a new b (a new buffer), not the original buffer we defined, therefore we need pass the address &b.

Append again, bytes.Buffer is defined:

type Buffer struct {
    buf       []byte   // contents are the bytes buf[off : len(buf)]
    off       int      // read at &buf[off], write at &buf[len(buf)]
    bootstrap [64]byte // memory to hold first slice; helps small buffers avoid allocation.
    lastRead  readOp   // last read operation, so that Unread* can work correctly.
}

using passed by value, the passed new buffer struct is different from the origin buffer variable.

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