224

I would like to use Class.newInstance() but the class I am instantiating does not have a nullary constructor. Therefore I need to be able to pass in constructor arguments. Is there a way to do this?

  • A great answer to considere is the Chris Jester-Young one. – Damian Lattenero Sep 1 '17 at 18:02
186
Class.getDeclaredConstructor(String.class).newInstance("HERESMYARG");
  • 21
    Just clarifying - getDeclaredConstructor is not a static method, you have to call it on the instance of the Class for your specific class. – clum May 22 '15 at 6:31
  • 1
    Seems like the answer is "no" for Java 1.1 – Jim Jul 28 '16 at 11:13
  • I have public constructor with List<String> parameters. Can't get it by getDeclaredConstructor, but with getConstructor works fine. Do you know why? – Line May 30 '17 at 9:03
  • It should be noted that this requires you to catch a whole slew of exceptions. When I realized there were at least 4, I just threw it in a try/catch block. Also, the arguments to getDeclaredConstructor() are the classes of the constructor parameters – Andrew P Nov 1 '18 at 23:33
86
myObject.getClass().getDeclaredConstructors(types list).newInstance(args list);

Edit: according to the comments seems like pointing class and method names is not enough for some users. For more info take a look at the documentation for getting constuctor and invoking it.

  • 18
    Answer doesn't say how you pass the args, or show an example. It's just a guess. – djangofan Jul 24 '11 at 0:52
  • 2
    Should it be getDeclaredConstructor (singular) ? – Luke Skywalker Aug 19 '14 at 15:19
  • 2
    @ryvantage is doesn't make it look like a static method as it's all being called on the "myObject" instance. It's just a daisy chain of method calls.Also not sure why this answer was useful to 55 people as it's wrong and the right one is below! – Arran Jan 28 '15 at 8:59
65

Assuming you have the following constructor

class MyClass {
    public MyClass(Long l, String s, int i) {

    }
}

You will need to show you intend to use this constructor like so:

Class classToLoad = MyClass.class;

Class[] cArg = new Class[3]; //Our constructor has 3 arguments
cArg[0] = Long.class; //First argument is of *object* type Long
cArg[1] = String.class; //Second argument is of *object* type String
cArg[2] = int.class; //Third argument is of *primitive* type int

Long l = new Long(88);
String s = "text";
int i = 5;

classToLoad.getDeclaredConstructor(cArg).newInstance(l, s, i);
16

Do not use Class.newInstance(); see this thread: Why is Class.newInstance() evil?

Like other answers say, use Constructor.newInstance() instead.

8

You can get other constructors with getConstructor(...).

7

Follow below steps to call parameterized consturctor.

  1. Get Constructor with parameter types by passing types in Class[] for getDeclaredConstructor method of Class
  2. Create constructor instance by passing values in Object[] for
    newInstance method of Constructor

Example code:

import java.lang.reflect.*;

class NewInstanceWithReflection{
    public NewInstanceWithReflection(){
        System.out.println("Default constructor");
    }
    public NewInstanceWithReflection( String a){
        System.out.println("Constructor :String => "+a);
    }
    public static void main(String args[]) throws Exception {

        NewInstanceWithReflection object = (NewInstanceWithReflection)Class.forName("NewInstanceWithReflection").newInstance();
        Constructor constructor = NewInstanceWithReflection.class.getDeclaredConstructor( new Class[] {String.class});
        NewInstanceWithReflection object1 = (NewInstanceWithReflection)constructor.newInstance(new Object[]{"StackOverFlow"});

    }
}

output:

java NewInstanceWithReflection
Default constructor
Constructor :String => StackOverFlow
1

You can use the getDeclaredConstructor method of Class. It expects an array of classes. Here is a tested and working example:

public static JFrame createJFrame(Class c, String name, Component parentComponent)
{
    try
    {
        JFrame frame = (JFrame)c.getDeclaredConstructor(new Class[] {String.class}).newInstance("name");
        if (parentComponent != null)
        {
            frame.setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
        }
        else
        {
            frame.setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.DISPOSE_ON_CLOSE);
        }
        frame.setLocationRelativeTo(parentComponent);
        frame.pack();
        frame.setVisible(true);
    }
    catch (InstantiationException instantiationException)
    {
        ExceptionHandler.handleException(instantiationException, parentComponent, Language.messages.get(Language.InstantiationExceptionKey), c.getName());
    }
    catch(NoSuchMethodException noSuchMethodException)
    {
        //ExceptionHandler.handleException(noSuchMethodException, parentComponent, Language.NoSuchMethodExceptionKey, "NamedConstructor");
        ExceptionHandler.handleException(noSuchMethodException, parentComponent, Language.messages.get(Language.NoSuchMethodExceptionKey), "(Constructor or a JFrame method)");
    }
    catch (IllegalAccessException illegalAccessException)
    {
        ExceptionHandler.handleException(illegalAccessException, parentComponent, Language.messages.get(Language.IllegalAccessExceptionKey));
    }
    catch (InvocationTargetException invocationTargetException)
    {
        ExceptionHandler.handleException(invocationTargetException, parentComponent, Language.messages.get(Language.InvocationTargetExceptionKey));
    }
    finally
    {
        return null;
    }
}
1

I think this is exactly what you want http://da2i.univ-lille1.fr/doc/tutorial-java/reflect/object/arg.html

Although it seems a dead thread, someone might find it useful

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