I implemented the multiton pattern using a templated class in C++.

#ifndef MULTITON_H
#define MULTITON_H

#include <map>

template <typename Key, typename T> class Multiton
{
public:    
    static void destroy()
    {
        for (typename std::map<Key, T*>::iterator it = instances.begin(); it != instances.end(); ++it) {
            delete (*it).second;
        }
    }

    static T& getRef(const Key& key)
    {
        typename std::map<Key, T*>::iterator it = instances.find(key);

        if (it != instances.end()) {
            return *(T*)(it->second);
        }

        T* instance = new T;
        instances[key] = instance;
        return *instance;
    }

    static T* getPtr(const Key& key)
    {
        typename std::map<Key, T*>::iterator it = instances.find(key);

        if (it != instances.end()) {
            return (T*)(it->second);
        }

        T* instance = new T;
        instances[key] = instance;
        return instance;
    }

protected:
    Multiton() {}
    virtual ~Multiton() {}

private:
    Multiton(const Multiton&) {}
    Multiton& operator= (const Multiton&) { return *this; }

    static std::map<Key, T*> instances;
};

template <typename Key, typename T> std::map<Key, T*> Multiton<Key, T>::instances;

#endif

Usage:

class Foo : public Multiton<std::string, Foo> {};
Foo& foo1 = Foo::getRef("foobar");
Foo* foo2 = Foo::getPtr("foobar");
Foo::destroy();

Any suggestions for improvements?

1) Personal preference, but I'd reverse the order of the template parameters and default the Key to std::string (if that's what you'll use most)

template <typename Key, typename T> class Multiton { ... }

Then you can do this:

class Foo : public Multiton<Foo> {};
class Bar : public Multiton<Bar,int> {};

Which I think is nicer.

2) Also if you're never passing pointers/references to Multitron (which wouldn't kind of violate the patter) you shouldn't need a virtual destructor in the class.

3) If you used a smarter container for your T*s you could avoid having to call Foo::destroy(). Something like std::map<Key,boost::shared_ptr<T> > would destroy all the objects when the static instance was destroyed. (Although if you cared about order of destruction, then you'd need something cleverer - you could adapt somethign from existing singleton solutions such as phoenix singletons etc)

4) You could change your iterators to const_iterators.

5) destroy should probably clear the map to prevent accidental access of invalid memory after calling destroy. Or if you want to protect against this you should throw an exception.

Foo* foo2 = Foo::getPtr("foobar");
Foo::destroy();
Foo::getPtr("foobar")->doSomething(); // BANG

6) If you're not using polymorphic T then you could use a std::map and your code would look like this...

template <typename Key, typename T> class Multiton
{
public:
    //Can probably get rid of this guy as maps destructor will do the right thing 
    static void destroy()
    {
        instances.clear();
    }

    static T& getRef(const Key& key)
    {
        return instances[key];
    }

    static T* getPtr(const Key& key)
    {
        return &instances[key];
    }

protected:
    Multiton() {}
    virtual ~Multiton() {}

private:
    Multiton(const Multiton&) {}
    Multiton& operator= (const Multiton&) { return *this; }

    static std::map<Key, T> instances;
};

That's about all I can think of for now.

  • About your point 6 - can you elaborate on the exact condition for using this simplified code? Where does the non-polymorphism of T come into play? – einpoklum Aug 20 '14 at 9:22
  • If you put an object of type D derived from T into the map it gets sliced back to its base class T - similar to what calling T temp = d does - and the compiler will probably not even tell you. In fact if T is an abstract class you wont even be able to create the map, so the whole thing wont compile. – Michael Anderson Aug 21 '14 at 1:03

One improvement would be to rewrite getRef to use getPtr (or vice versa, the direction doesn't matter so much as not repeating yourself):

static T& getRef(const Key& key)
{
    return *getPtr(key);
}

Your Answer

 

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.