12

What is the best way to compare two variables for identical javascript types?:

I.E.

[] = ['1','2','3']
[] != {}
Number = Number
null = null

etc. etc.

4 Answers 4

20

To just compare types, one would think typeof would be the right tool

typeof [] === typeof ['1','2','3']; // true, both are arrays

Note that null, arrays etc. are of type 'object', which means

typeof [] === typeof null; // is true (both are objects)
typeof [] === typeof {};   // is true (both are objects)

which is expected behaviour.

If you have to specifically check for null, arrays or other things, you could just write a better typeof function

var toType = function(obj) {
  return ({}).toString.call(obj).match(/\s([a-zA-Z]+)/)[1].toLowerCase()
}

FIDDLE

Then you could do

toType([]) === toType(['1','2','3']); // true
toType([]) === toType({});     // false
toType(1) === toType(9999);    // true
toType(null) === toType(null); // true
toType(null) === toType([]);   // false
3
  • Love it! Exactly what I was looking for - Here's a random thought in my testing. What about function test(){} toType(new test()); which will appear as an object?
    – Corey
    May 4, 2014 at 20:53
  • Yeah, but: function test1(){} && test2(){} will equal each other toType(new test1()) == toType(new test2()); - I don't really need this tho, was just curious - actually don't worry about it lol, I'm fine with this. Thanks for your help!
    – Corey
    May 4, 2014 at 20:57
  • Yes, they are both of type object, so they will be the same with toType(). You can't really compare objects, as two objects are never the same, even {} == {} will be false, as two objects are never equal even if they contain the same things.
    – adeneo
    May 4, 2014 at 20:59
5

If you want to distinguish object "types" from each other, it might be a good idea to compare their prototypes:

Object.getPrototypeOf([]) === Object.getPrototypeOf([1, 2, 3])
Object.getPrototypeOf({}) !== Object.getPrototypeOf([])

This will however throw if you're not passing in objects, so if you also want to compare the types of primitive values (including null) you will have to do more sophisticated tests:

function sameType(a, b) {
    var objectA = Object(a) === a,
        objectB = Object(b) === b;
    if (objectA && objectB)
        return Object.getPrototypeOf(a) === Object.getPrototypeOf(b);
    else if (!objectA && !objectB)
        return typeof a === typeof b;
    else
        return false;
}
0

https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/Operators/typeof

typeof 5 === typeof 37
typeof {} === typeof []
0

This should work for all "types":

function haveSameType(a,b) {
  return (a instanceof Array && b instanceof Array) ||
    (a === null && b === null) ||
    (typeof a === typeof b && 
     b !== null && 
     a !== null &&
     ! (a instanceof Array) &&
     ! (b instanceof Array)
    );
}

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