86

I want to ignore bin and obj folders from my git repository. As I've found out, there is no easy way to do this in .gitignore. So, are there any other way? Using clean solution in Visual Studio?

  • It works OK for me - I add the words 'bin' and 'obj' as separate lines in my .gitignore file – Tim Robinson Feb 27 '10 at 12:46
  • And if solution consists of many projects, not just one? – chester89 Feb 27 '10 at 12:48
  • Can you post exactly what you are trying and what isn't working. obj and bin in a top level .gitignore should ignore everything called obj or bin at all lower levels. – CB Bailey Feb 27 '10 at 12:56
  • 2
    My understanding is that the .gitignore contents apply in every subdirectory, so plain 'bin' and 'obj' work everywhere. Will post my .gitignore in an answer. – Tim Robinson Feb 27 '10 at 12:58
143

I'm not sure why this doesn't work for you. In case it helps, here's a typical .gitignore file from one of my Visual Studio/git projects:

*.suo
*.user
_ReSharper.*
bin
obj
packages
  • 4
    I also add packages as you can easily re-download them from NuGet – Michal Ciechan Mar 4 '15 at 0:46
  • it does not work when you first commit all files and then add .gitignore file to your repo and commit it. Newly ignored files are still will be shown as modified (if you rebuild, for example). – vlad2135 Jun 23 at 15:30
  • 2
    I recently used the suggested .gitignore file found here: github.com/github/gitignore/blob/master/VisualStudio.gitignore with great success. – BigTFromAZ Sep 20 at 20:24
  • @BigTFromAZ You should add that as an answer, it's much better than the accepted one! – Avrohom Yisroel Nov 14 at 15:53
35

simply making an entry in gitignore may not ignore files, you may need to commit it. I used the following method and worked for me

git rm -r --cached .

git add .

then

git commit -am "Remove ignored files"

However, this ignores my scripts folder which I included later into the repository.

  • It works OK. But Vscode couldn't find the modified code. I changed something myself and I pushed it to origin master. Then it worked. :) – Dentrax Mar 15 '18 at 11:01
  • I have a solution with many projects and for some reason the git add . never completes. – Chucky Jul 10 '18 at 14:51
  • Great Arvind!, a newbie developer merged all bin/ and obj/ to our working branch (skiping policies ... i don't know how!) and this was the way for remove all those files from the repo. – equintas Aug 1 at 8:35
  • Newbie me (at least to git), I did this to myself. Never thought to rm and then add back because I didn't understand that git rm only deletes the items from the index and not the disk. So if I understand correctly, your first two commands rebuilt the index by deleting everything from the index and adding everything back, applying the .gitignore filters. Then the commit makes it so in the repository. Very clever. – BigTFromAZ Sep 20 at 20:21
2

If you want to ignore bin and obj in ALL your projects then you can use (from gitignore man page)

Patterns read from the file specified by the configuration variable core.excludesfile.

core.excludesfile can be set in a config file which is ~/.gitconfig in Unix - I don't know where it is under Windows

  • Good info, but he meant all his Visual Studio projects in this solution not ALL projects on the machine. – AhHatem Jan 14 '12 at 14:54
  • 2
    Although most likely he'll never be interested in commiting the bin and obj folders in ANY solution. :) – MEMark Jul 25 '13 at 23:50
2
  • Locate the bin and obj folders in Windows Explorer
  • Right click TortoiseGit > Delete and add to ignore list > bin
  • Right click TortoiseGit > Delete and add to ignore list > obj
0

If you try through source tree and still the ignore files are not coming in , go to tools-->option->Git and then select location of the .gitignore enter image description here

0

If you are using Visual Studio then there is a simple way to do this.

  1. Open Team Explorer
  2. Click on settings
  3. Repository Settings
  4. Under Ignore & Attribute file section Click on Add beside Ignore file.

It will create a default .gitignore file, which will ignore most of common folders & files that will used by framework/language.

enter image description here

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.