This may be treading that line between answerable and opinionated, but I'm going back and forth as to how to structure a ReactJS component as complexity grows and could use some direction.

Coming from AngularJS, I want to pass my model into the component as a property and have the component modify the model directly. Or should I be splitting the model up into various state properties and compiling it back together when sending back upstream? What is the ReactJS way?

Take the example of a blog post editor. Trying to modify the model directly ends up looking like:

var PostEditor = React.createClass({
  updateText: function(e) {
    var text = e.target.value;
    this.props.post.text = text;
    this.forceUpdate();
  },
  render: function() {
    return (
      <input value={this.props.post.text} onChange={this.updateText}/>
      <button onClick={this.props.post.save}/>Save</button>
    );
  }
});

Which seems wrong.

Is it more the React way to make our text model property state, and compile it back into the model before saving like:

var PostEditor = React.createClass({
  getInitialState: function() {
    return {
      text: ""
    };
  },
  componentWillMount: function() {
    this.setState({
      text: this.props.post.text
    });
  },
  updateText: function(e) {
    this.setState({
      text: e.target.value
    });
  },
  savePost: function() {
    this.props.post.text = this.state.text;
    this.props.post.save();
  },
  render: function() {
    return (
      <input value={this.state.text} onChange={this.updateText}/>
      <button onClick={this.savePost}/>Save</button>
    );
  }
});

This doesn't require a call to this.forceUpdate(), but as the model grows, (a post may have an author, subject, tags, comments, ratings, etc...) the component starts getting really complicated.

Is the first method with ReactLink the way to go?

up vote 61 down vote accepted

Your second approach is more like it. React doesn't care about models so much as it cares about values and how they flow through your app. Ideally, your post model would be stored in a single component at the root. You then create child components that each consume parts of the model.

You can pass callbacks down to the children that need to modify your data, and call them from the child component.

Modifying this.props or this.state directly is not a good idea, because React will not be able to pick up on the changes. That's because React does a shallow comparison of your post prop to determine if it has changed.

I made this jsfiddle to show how data could flow from an outer to an inner component:

http://jsfiddle.net/jxg/M3CLB/

The handleClick method shows 3 ways to (im)properly update state:

var Outer = React.createClass({

  getInitialState: function() {
    return {data: {value: 'at first, it works'}};
  },

  handleClick: function () {

    // 1. This doesn't work, render is not triggered.
    // Never set state directly because the updated values
    // can still be read, which can lead to unexpected behavior.

    this.state.data.value = 'but React will never know!';

    // 2. This works, because we use setState

    var newData = {value: 'it works 2'};
    this.setState({data: newData});

    // 3. Alternatively you can use React's immutability helpers
    // to update more complex models.
    // Read more: http://facebook.github.io/react/docs/update.html

    var newState = React.addons.update(this.state, {
      data: {value: {$set: 'it works'}}
    });
    this.setState(newState);
 },

  render: function() {
      return <Inner data={this.state.data} handleClick={this.handleClick} />;
  }
});
  • But what do we do if we have an opaque model, with its own state manipulation functions? For example, suppose that instead of a text field, we have a setText method that does validation and some other stuff. I can see method (2) working if setText is pure and returns a brand new instance of the model. However, if setText just updates the inner state we would still need to call forceUpdate, right? – hugomg May 6 '14 at 16:57
  • 1
    Yes, you could call forceUpdate, but at that point you're "leaking" out of React. It might be better to pass a setState() callback to the opaque model to avoid having to manually trigger re-renders. – jxg May 7 '14 at 0:36
  • I'm still not sure I'm fully understanding. So any component intended to modify data needs to do a deep copy of the props passed in? Then modify and send that copy upstream so as not to modify the original data? Eventually the change will flow all the way to the root, where it's dealt with, and the whole app is rerendered? Is that right? – nicholas May 8 '14 at 19:03

Updating 2016: React is changed, and explanation "props vs state" became very simple. If a component needs to change data - put it in a state, otherwise in props. Because props are read-only now.

What's the exact difference between props and state?

You can find good explanation here (full version)

Changing props and state

  • 1
    actually setProps() could change props inside a component and trigger a re-render – WaiKit Kung Aug 21 '15 at 17:46
  • 2
    setProps is deprecated and should not be used. Replacement is to rerender the component and let React handle the differences. – jdmichal Apr 4 '16 at 19:42
  • And if you're looking for a explainer video: youtube.com/watch?v=qh3dYM6Keuw – jaisonDavis Jul 16 '16 at 4:18

From React doc

props are immutable: they are passed from the parent and are "owned" by the parent. To implement interactions, we introduce mutable state to the component. this.state is private to the component and can be changed by calling this.setState(). When the state is updated, the component re-renders itself.

From TrySpace: when props (or state) are updated (via setProps/setState or parent) the component re-renders as well.

A reading from Thinking in React:

Let's go through each one and figure out which one is state. Simply ask three questions about each piece of data:

  1. Is it passed in from a parent via props? If so, it probably isn't state.
  2. Does it change over time? If not, it probably isn't state.

  3. Can you compute it based on any other state or props in your component? If so, it's not state.

I'm not sure if I'm answering your question, but I've found that, especially in a large/growing application, the Container/Component pattern works incredibly well.

Essentially you have two React components:

  • a "pure" display component, which deals with styling and DOM interaction;
  • a container component, which deals with accessing/saving external data, managing state, and rendering the display component.

Example

N.B. This example is a probably too simple to illustrate the benefits of this pattern, as it is quite verbose for such a straightforward case.

/**
 * Container Component
 *
 *  - Manages component state
 *  - Does plumbing of data fetching/saving
 */

var PostEditorContainer = React.createClass({
  getInitialState: function() {
    return {
      text: ""
    };
  },

  componentWillMount: function() {
    this.setState({
      text: getPostText()
    });
  },

  updateText: function(text) {
    this.setState({
      text: text
    });
  },

  savePost: function() {
    savePostText(this.state.text);
  },

  render: function() {
    return (
      <PostEditor
        text={this.state.text}
        onChange={this.updateText.bind(this)}
        onSave={this.savePost.bind(this)}
      />
    );
  }
});


/**
 * Pure Display Component
 *
 *  - Calculates styling based on passed properties
 *  - Often just a render method
 *  - Uses methods passed in from container to announce changes
 */

var PostEditor = React.createClass({
  render: function() {
    return (
      <div>
        <input type="text" value={this.props.text} onChange={this.props.onChange} />
        <button type="button" onClick={this.props.onSave} />
      </div>
    );
  }
});

Benefits

By keeping display logic and data/state management separate, you have a re-usable display component which:

  • can easily be iterated with different sets of props using something like react-component-playground
  • can be wrapped with a different container for different behavior (or combine with other components to build larger parts of your application

You also have a container component which deals with all external communication. This should make it easier to be flexible about the way you access your data if you make any serious changes later on*.

This pattern also makes writing and implementing unit tests a lot more straightforward.

Having iterated a large React app a few times, I've found that this pattern keeps things relatively painless, especially when you have larger components with calculated styles or complicated DOM interactions.

*Read up on the flux pattern, and take a look at Marty.js, which largely inspired this answer (and I have been using a lot lately) Redux (and react-redux), which implement this pattern extremely well.

  • +1000, we just used that style here and it worked – codyc4321 Nov 10 '16 at 15:05

I think you're using an anti-pattern which Facebook has already explained at this link

Here's thing you're finding:

React.createClass({
  getInitialState: function() {
    return { value: { foo: 'bar' } };
  },

  onClick: function() {
    var value = this.state.value;
    value.foo += 'bar'; // ANTI-PATTERN!
    this.setState({ value: value });
  },

  render: function() {
    return (
      <div>
        <InnerComponent value={this.state.value} />
        <a onClick={this.onClick}>Click me</a>
      </div>
    );
  }
});

The first time the inner component gets rendered, it will have { foo: 'bar' } as the value prop. If the user clicks on the anchor, the parent component's state will get updated to { value: { foo: 'barbar' } }, triggering the re-rendering process of the inner component, which will receive { foo: 'barbar' } as the new value for the prop.

The problem is that since the parent and inner components share a reference to the same object, when the object gets mutated on line 2 of the onClick function, the prop the inner component had will change. So, when the re-rendering process starts, and shouldComponentUpdate gets invoked, this.props.value.foo will be equal to nextProps.value.foo, because in fact, this.props.value references the same object as nextProps.value.

Consequently, since we'll miss the change on the prop and short circuit the re-rendering process, the UI won't get updated from 'bar' to 'barbar'

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