5

I've come across some interesting behavior with the XmlSerializer.

If I try to serialize a class that has a property of Type object and that object implements IXmlSerializable, the serializer will throw an InvalidOperationException with the InnerException:

The type ConsoleApplication1.MyClass may not be used in this context. To use ConsoleApplication1.MyClass as a parameter, return type, or member of a class or struct, the parameter, return type, or member must be declared as type ConsoleApplication1.MyClass (it cannot be object). Objects of type ConsoleApplication1.MyClass may not be used in un-typed collections, such as ArrayLists.

However, if the object does NOT implement IXmlSerializable, the serializer will execute just fine.

Is this a bug in the way that the XmlSerializer is handling objects that are IXmlSerializable?

Below is a very basic case that will cause this exception to throw.

public class SerializableClass
{
    public object Configuration { get; set; }
}

public class MyClass : IXmlSerializable
{
    public string MyProperty { get; set; }

    public MyClass()
    {
        MyProperty = string.Empty;
    }

    public System.Xml.Schema.XmlSchema GetSchema() { return null; }

    public void ReadXml(System.Xml.XmlReader reader) { /*Read*/ }

    public void WriteXml(System.Xml.XmlWriter writer) { /*Write*/ }
}

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        SerializableClass element = new SerializableClass
        {
            Configuration = new MyClass
            {
                MyProperty = "My Awesome Property"
            }
        };

        using (StringWriter writer = new StringWriter())
        {
            XmlSerializer serializer = new XmlSerializer(typeof(SerializableClass), new Type[] { typeof(MyClass) });
            serializer.Serialize(writer, element);
        }
    }
}
1
  • The one thing I can think of that is causing this problem is that the XmlSerializer preventing me from serializing in this fashion because it won't know Type to call ReadXml on in deserialization. – Kyle Uithoven May 5 '14 at 22:30
0

The Configuration property in the SerializableClass is causing the problems. It is declared as an object, changing it to type MyClass will fix your problem

public class SerializableClass
{
    public MyClass Configuration { get; set; }
}
1
  • Unfortunately, the Configuration needs to able to be any object, not just 'MyClass' which is why it is of type object. – Kyle Uithoven May 6 '14 at 19:40

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