87

I've been trying to optimize some extremely performance-critical code (a quick sort algorithm that's being called millions and millions of times inside a monte carlo simulation) by loop unrolling. Here's the inner loop I'm trying to speed up:

// Search for elements to swap.
while(myArray[++index1] < pivot) {}
while(pivot < myArray[--index2]) {}

I tried unrolling to something like:

while(true) {
    if(myArray[++index1] < pivot) break;
    if(myArray[++index1] < pivot) break;
    // More unrolling
}


while(true) {
    if(pivot < myArray[--index2]) break;
    if(pivot < myArray[--index2]) break;
    // More unrolling
}

This made absolutely no difference so I changed it back to the more readable form. I've had similar experiences other times I've tried loop unrolling. Given the quality of branch predictors on modern hardware, when, if ever, is loop unrolling still a useful optimization?

  • 1
    May I ask why you aren't using standard library quicksort routines? – Peter Alexander Feb 27 '10 at 22:54
  • 14
    @Poita: Because mine have some extra features that I need for the statistical calculations I'm doing and are very highly tuned for my use cases and therefore less general but measurably faster than the standard lib. I'm using the D programming language, which has an old crappy optimizer, and for large arrays of random floats, I still beat GCC's C++ STL sort by 10-20%. – dsimcha Feb 27 '10 at 23:06
112

Loop unrolling makes sense if you can break dependency chains. This gives a out of order or super-scalar CPU the possibility to schedule things better and thus run faster.

A simple example:

for (int i=0; i<n; i++)
{
  sum += data[i];
}

Here the dependency chain of the arguments is very short. If you get a stall because you have a cache-miss on the data-array the cpu cannot do anything but to wait.

On the other hand this code:

for (int i=0; i<n; i+=4)
{
  sum1 += data[i+0];
  sum2 += data[i+1];
  sum3 += data[i+2];
  sum4 += data[i+3];
}
sum = sum1 + sum2 + sum3 + sum4;

could run faster. If you get a cache miss or other stall in one calculation there are still three other dependency chains that don't depend on the stall. A out of order CPU can execute these.

  • 2
    Thanks. I've tried loop unrolling in this style in several other places in the library where I'm calculating sums and stuff, and in these places it works wonders. I'm almost sure the reason is that it increases instruction level parallelism, as you suggest. – dsimcha Mar 3 '10 at 2:03
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    Nice answer and instructive example. Although I do not see how stalls on cache-misses could impact performance for this particular example. I came to explain to myself the performance differences between the two pieces of code (on my machine the second piece of code is 2-3 times faster) by noting that the first disables any kind of instruction-level parallelism in the floating point lanes. The second would allow a super-scalar CPU to execute up to four floating point adds at the same time. – Toby Brull Nov 18 '14 at 23:12
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    Keep in mind that the result will not be numerically identical to the original loop when computing a sum this way. – Barabas Jun 30 '16 at 20:34
  • The loop-carried dependency is one cycle, the addition. An OoO core will do fine. Here unrolling might help floating point SIMD, but that isn't about OoO. – Veedrac Jun 10 '17 at 14:41
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    @Nils: Not very much; mainstream x86 OoO CPUs are still similar enough to Core2/Nehalem/K10. Catching up after a cache miss was still pretty minor, hiding FP latency was still the major benefit. In 2010, CPUs that could do 2 loads per clock were even rarer (just AMD because SnB wasn't released yet), so multiple accumulators were definitely less valuable for integer code than now (of course this is scalar code that should auto-vectorize, so who knows whether compilers will turn multiple accumulators into vector elements or into multiple vector accumulators...) – Peter Cordes Apr 3 '18 at 19:40
22

Those wouldn't make any difference because you're doing the same number of comparisons. Here's a better example. Instead of:

for (int i=0; i<200; i++) {
  doStuff();
}

write:

for (int i=0; i<50; i++) {
  doStuff();
  doStuff();
  doStuff();
  doStuff();
}

Even then it almost certainly won't matter but you are now doing 50 comparisons instead of 200 (imagine the comparison is more complex).

Manual loop unrolling in general is largely an artifact of history however. It's another of the growing list of things that a good compiler will do for you when it matters. For example, most people don't bother to write x <<= 1 or x += x instead of x *= 2. You just write x *= 2 and the compiler will optimize it for you to whatever is best.

Basically there's increasingly less need to second-guess your compiler.

  • 1
    @Mike Certainly turning optimization off if a good idea when puzzled, but it is worth reading the link that Poita_ posted. Compilers are getting painfully good at that business. – dmckee Mar 2 '10 at 2:48
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    @Mike "I'm perfectly capable of deciding when or when not to do those things"... I doubt it, unless you're superhuman. – Mr. Boy Mar 31 '10 at 14:20
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    @John: I don't know why you say that; folks seem to think optimization is some kind of black art only compilers and good guessers know how to do. It all comes down to instructions and cycles and the reasons why they are spent. As I've explained many times on SO, it is easy to tell how and why those are being spent. If I've got a loop that has to use a significant percent of time, and it spends too many cycles in the loop overhead, compared to the content, I can see that and unroll it. Same for code hoisting. It doesn't take a genius. – Mike Dunlavey Mar 31 '10 at 15:14
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    I'm sure it's not that hard, but I still doubt you can do it as fast as the compiler does. What's the problem with the compiler doing it for you anyway? If you don't like it just turn optimizations off and burn your time away like it's 1990! – Mr. Boy Mar 31 '10 at 15:22
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    The performance gain due to loop unrolling has nothing to do with the comparisons that you are saving. Nothing at all. – bobbogo Jun 1 '15 at 8:20
14

Regardless of branch prediction on modern hardware, most compilers do loop unrolling for you anyway.

It would be worthwhile finding out how much optimizations your compiler does for you.

I found Felix von Leitner's presentation very enlightening on the subject. I recommend you read it. Summary: Modern compilers are VERY clever, so hand optimizations are almost never effective.

  • Nice read. Thanks. – dsimcha Feb 27 '10 at 23:08
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    That is a good read, but the only part I thought was on the mark was where he talks about keeping data structure simple. The rest of it was accurate but rests on a giant unstated assumption - that what is being executed has to be. In the tuning I do, I find people worrying about registers & cache misses when massive amounts of time are going into needless mountains of abstraction code. – Mike Dunlavey Mar 31 '10 at 16:12
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    "hand optimizations are almost never effective" → Perhaps true if you're completely new to the task. Simply not true otherwise. – Veedrac Jun 10 '17 at 14:47
2

As far as I understand it, modern compilers already unroll loops where appropriate - an example being gcc, if passed the optimisation flags it the manual says it will:

Unroll loops whose number of iterations can be determined at compile time or upon entry to the loop.

So, in practice it's likely that your compiler will do the trivial cases for you. It's up to you therefore to make sure that as many as possible of your loops are easy for the compiler to determine how many iterations will be needed.

  • Just in time compilers usually don't do loop unrolling, the heuristics are too expensive. Static compilers can spend more time on it, but the difference between the two dominant ways is important. – Abel Sep 30 '17 at 4:53
2

Loop unrolling, whether it's hand unrolling or compiler unrolling, can often be counter-productive, particularly with more recent x86 CPUs (Core 2, Core i7). Bottom line: benchmark your code with and without loop unrolling on whatever CPUs you plan to deploy this code on.

  • Why particularly on recet x86 CPUs? – JohnTortugo Aug 11 '13 at 12:05
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    @JohnTortugo: Modern x86 CPUs have certain optimisations for small loops - see e.g. Loop Stream Detector on Core and Nehalem achitectures - unrolling a loop so that it is no longer small enough to fit within the LSD cache defeats this optimisation. See e.g. tomshardware.com/reviews/Intel-i7-nehalem-cpu,2041-3.html – Paul R Aug 11 '13 at 14:54
1

Trying without knowing is not the way to do it.
Does this sort take a high percentage of overall time?

All loop unrolling does is reduce the loop overhead of incrementing/decrementing, comparing for the stop condition, and jumping. If what you're doing in the loop takes more instruction cycles than the loop overhead itself, you're not going to see much improvement percentage-wise.

Here's an example of how to get maximum performance.

1

Loop unrolling can be helpful in specific cases. The only gain isn't skipping some tests!

It can for instance allow scalar replacement, efficient insertion of software prefetching... You would be surprised actually how useful it can be (you can easily get 10% speedup on most loops even with -O3) by aggressively unrolling.

As it was said before though, it depends a lot on the loop and the compiler and experiment is necessary. It's hard to make a rule (or the compiler heuristic for unrolling would be perfect)

0

Loop unrolling entirely depends on your problem size. It is entirely dependent on your algorithm being able to reduce the size into smaller groups of work. What you did above does not look like that. I am not sure if a monte carlo simulation can even be unrolled.

I good scenario for loop unrolling would be rotating an image. Since you could rotate separate groups of work. To get this to work you would have to reduce the number of iterations.

  • I was unrolling a quick sort that gets called from the inner loop of my simulation, not the main loop of the simulation. – dsimcha Feb 27 '10 at 22:47
0

Loop unrolling is still useful if there are a lot of local variables both in and with the loop. To reuse those registers more instead of saving one for the loop index.

In your example, you use small amount of local variables, not overusing the registers.

Comparison (to loop end) are also a major drawback if the comparison is heavy (i.e non-test instruction), especially if it depends on an external function.

Loop unrolling helps increasing the CPU's awareness for branch prediction as well, but those occur anyway.

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