31

tl;dr

Why doesn't:

SELECT 
    SomeXmlColumn.nodes('/people/person') AS foo(b)
FROM MyTable

work?

The Before Question

Nearly ever answer I've seen (or gotten) for using XPath queries in SQL Server requires that you join the XML document back to itself using a CROSS APPLY.

Why?

For example:

SELECT 
   p.value('(./firstName)[1]', 'VARCHAR(8000)') AS firstName,
   p.value('(./lastName)[1]', 'VARCHAR(8000)') AS lastName
FROM table 
   CROSS APPLY field.nodes('/person') t(p)

For example:

SELECT a.BatchXml.value('(Name)[1]', 'varchar(50)') AS Name,
    a.BatchXml.value('(IDInfo/IDType)[1]', 'varchar(50)') AS IDType,
    a.BatchXml.value('(IDInfo/IDOtherDescription)[1]', 'varchar(50)') AS IDOtherDescription
FROM BatchReports b
CROSS APPLY b.BatchFileXml.nodes('Customer') A(BatchXml)
WHERE a.BatchXml.exist('IDInfo/IDType[text()=3]')=1

For example:

SELECT  b.BatchID,
        x.XmlCol.value('(ReportHeader/OrganizationReportReferenceIdentifier)[1]','VARCHAR(100)') AS OrganizationReportReferenceIdentifier,
        x.XmlCol.value('(ReportHeader/OrganizationNumber)[1]','VARCHAR(100)') AS OrganizationNumber
FROM    Batches b
CROSS APPLY b.RawXml.nodes('/CasinoDisbursementReportXmlFile/CasinoDisbursementReport') x(XmlCol);

And even from MSDN Books Online:

SELECT nref.value('first-name[1]', 'nvarchar(32)') FirstName,
       nref.value('last-name[1]', 'nvarchar(32)') LastName
FROM    [XmlFile] CROSS APPLY [Contents].nodes('//author') AS p(nref)

They all use it. But nobody (not even the SQL Server Books Online) explains why it's needed, what problem it solves, what it's doing, or how it works.

Even the simplest case needs them

Even the simplest example of taking the XML:

<people>
   <person><firstName>Jon</firstName><lastName>Johnson</lastName></person>
   <person><firstName>Kathy</firstName><lastName>Carter</lastName></person>
   <person><firstName>Bob</firstName><lastName>Burns</lastName></person>
</people>

and returning the values:

FirstName  LastName
=========  ========
Jon        Johnson
Kathy      Carter
Bob        Burns

needs a join:

SELECT 
   p.value('(./firstName)[1]', 'VARCHAR(8000)') AS firstName,
   p.value('(./lastName)[1]', 'VARCHAR(8000)') AS lastName
FROM table 
   CROSS APPLY field.nodes('/person') t(p)

What's confusing is that it doesn't even use the table it joins from, why does it need it?

Since querying for XML has never been documented or explained, hopefully we can solve that now.

What does it actually do?

So let's start with an actual example, since we want an actual answer, that gives an actual explanation:

DECLARE @xml xml;
SET @xml = 
'<people>
   <person><firstName>Jon</firstName><lastName>Johnson</lastName></person>
   <person><firstName>Kathy</firstName><lastName>Carter</lastName></person>
   <person><firstName>Bob</firstName><lastName>Burns</lastName></person>
</people>';
;WITH MyTable AS (
    SELECT @xml AS SomeXmlColumn
)

Now we have psuedo table we can query from:

enter image description here

Let's start with the obvious

First I need the people. In real XML, I can easily return the three rows:

/people/person

Which gives a NodeList containing three nodes:

<person><firstName>Jon</firstName><lastName>Johnson</lastName></person>
<person><firstName>Kathy</firstName><lastName>Carter</lastName></person>
<person><firstName>Bob</firstName><lastName>Burns</lastName></person>

In SQL Server, the same query:

SELECT 
   SomeXmlColumn.query('/people/person')
FROM MyTable

doesn't return three rows, but rather one row with the XML containing the three nodes:

<person>
  <firstName>Jon</firstName>
  <lastName>Johnson</lastName>
</person>
<person>
  <firstName>Kathy</firstName>
  <lastName>Carter</lastName>
</person>
<person>
  <firstName>Bob</firstName>
  <lastName>Burns</lastName>
</person>

Obviously this is unsuitable, when my end goal is to return 3 rows. I somehow have to break up the three rows into three rows.

Onto the names

My actual goal is to get the firstName and lastName. In XPath I could do something like:

/people/person/firstName|/people/person/lastName

which gets me the six nodes, although they are not adjoining

<firstName>Jon</firstName>
<lastName>Johnson</lastName>
<firstName>Kathy</firstName>
<lastName>Carter</lastName>
<firstName>Bob</firstName>
<lastName>Burns</lastName>

In SQL Server, we try something similar

SELECT 
    SomeXmlColumn.query('/people/person/firstName') AS FirstName,
    SomeXmlColumn.query('/people/person/lastName') AS LastName
FROM MyTable

which gets us one row, with each column containing an XML fragment:

FirstName                     LastName
============================  ============================
<firstName>Jon</firstName>    <lastName>Johnson</lastName>
<firstName>Kathy</firstName>  <lastName>Carter</lastName>
<firstName>Bob</firstName>    <lastName>Burns</lastName>

...and now I'm tired. I've spent three hours writing this question, on top of the four hours I spent asking yesterday's question. I'll come back to this question later; when it's cooler in here, and I have more energy to beg for help.

Second wind

The fundamental problem is that no matter what I do, I keep getting only one row returned. I want three rows returned (because there are three people). SQL Server does have a function that can convert XML rows (called nodes) into SQL Server rows (called rows). It's the .nodes function:

The nodes() method is useful when you want to shred an xml data type instance into relational data. It allows you to identify nodes that will be mapped into a new row.

This means that you "call" the .nodes method with an XPath query on an xml data type. And what used to come back in SQL Server as one row with three nodes, comes back (correctly) as three nodes:

.nodes('/people/person') AS MyDerivedTable(SomeOtherXmlColumn)

Conceptually this returns:

SomeOtherXmlColumn
------------------------------------------------------------------------
<person><firstName>Jon</firstName><lastName>Johnson</lastName></person>
<person><firstName>Kathy</firstName><lastName>Carter</lastName></person>
<person><firstName>Bob</firstName><lastName>Burns</lastName></person>

But if you actually try to use it, it doesn't work:

DECLARE @xml xml;
SET @xml = 
'<people>
   <person><firstName>Jon</firstName><lastName>Johnson</lastName></person>
   <person><firstName>Kathy</firstName><lastName>Carter</lastName></person>
   <person><firstName>Bob</firstName><lastName>Burns</lastName></person>
</people>';
SELECT *
FROM @xml.nodes('/people/person') AS MyDervicedTable(SomeOtherXmlColumn)

Gives the error:

Msg 493, Level 16, State 1, Line 8
The column 'SomeOtherXmlColumn' that was returned from the nodes() method cannot be used directly. It can only be used with one of the four XML data type methods, exist(), nodes(), query(), and value(), or in IS NULL and IS NOT NULL checks.

I presume this is because I'm not allowed to look at the results set (i.e. the * is not allowed). No problem. I'll use the same .query I used originally:

SELECT SomeOtherXmlColumn.query('/') AS SomeOtherOtherXmlColumn
FROM @xml.nodes('/people/person') AS MyDervicedTable(SomeOtherXmlColumn)

Which returns rows. But rather than splitting a list of nodes into rows, it just duplicates the entire XML:

SomeOtherOtherXmlColumn
----------------------------------------
<people><person><firstName>Jon</firstName><lastName>Johnson</lastName></person><person><firstName>Kathy</firstName><lastName>Carter</lastName></person><person><firstName>Bob</firstName><lastName>Burns</lastName></person></people>
<people><person><firstName>Jon</firstName><lastName>Johnson</lastName></person><person><firstName>Kathy</firstName><lastName>Carter</lastName></person><person><firstName>Bob</firstName><lastName>Burns</lastName></person></people>
<people><person><firstName>Jon</firstName><lastName>Johnson</lastName></person><person><firstName>Kathy</firstName><lastName>Carter</lastName></person><person><firstName>Bob</firstName><lastName>Burns</lastName></person></people>

Which makes sense. I was expecting an XPath query in SQL Server to behave like XPath. But a hindsight careful reading of the docs say otherwise:

The result of the nodes() method is a rowset that contains logical copies of the original XML instances. In these logical copies, the context node of every row instance is set to one of the nodes identified with the query expression, so that subsequent queries can navigate relative to these context nodes.

Now do it with an xml column

The preceding example was for a variable of type xml. Now we have to retrofit the .nodes function to work with a table containing an xml column:

SELECT 
   SomeXmlColumn.nodes('/people/person')
FROM MyTable

No, that doesn't work:

Msg 227, Level 15, State 1, Line 8
"nodes" is not a valid function, property, or field.

Although .nodes is a valid method of an xml data type, it simply doesn't work when you try to use it on an xml data type. Nor does it work on when used on an xml data type:

SELECT *
FROM MyTable.SomeXmlColumn.nodes('/people/person')

Msg 208, Level 16, State 1, Line 8
Invalid object name 'MyTable.SomeXmlColumn.nodes'.

Which I presume is why the CROSS APPLY modifier is needed. Not because you are joining anything, but because the SQL Server parser will refuse to recognize .nodes unless it's preceded with the keywords cross apply:

SELECT 
    'test' AS SomeTestColumn
FROM MyTable CROSS APPLY MyTable.SomeXmlColumn.nodes('/people/person') AS MyDerivedTable(SomeOtherXmlColumn)

And we start to get somewhere:

SomeTestColumn
--------------
test
test
test

And so if we then want to see the XML that comes back:

SELECT 
    SomeOtherXmlColumn.query('/')
FROM (MyTable CROSS APPLY MyTable.SomeXmlColumn.nodes('/people/person') AS MyDerivedTable(SomeOtherXmlColumn))

Now we have three rows.

It seems that cross apply isn't used to a join, but merely a keyword that allows .nodes to work

And it seems that the SQL Server optimizer just refuses to accept any use of

.nodes

and you must actually use:

CROSS APPLY .nodes

And that's just how it is. And if that's the case - that's fine. That's the rule. And that led to years of confusion; thinking I was joining something to something else with the cross apply operator.

Except I believe there is more to it than that. There must, somehow, actually be a cross apply happening. But I cannot see where - or why.

  • first guess...those XML functions are table value functions and as such can return multiple columns. Does SELECT (Select 1 from SomeXmlColumn.nodes('/people/person')) AS foo(b) FROM MyTable work for you? – Brad May 6 '14 at 15:55
  • Brad has the right of it; the nodes method on the XML datatype is a table-valued function. Also, you appear to be using the query method where you mean to use the value method. From the docs, query will always return xml. – Ben Thul May 6 '14 at 18:06
14

Query:

SELECT x.i.value('(./text())[1]', 'VARCHAR(10)')
FROM MyTable.SomeXmlColumn.nodes('./people/person/firstName') AS x(i);

doesn't work, for the same reason why this query doesn't work:

SELECT *
FROM Person.Person.FirstName;

but this does:

SELECT FirstName
FROM Person.Person;

-

FROM clause expects rowset, so this is valid, since nodes() returns rowset:

DECLARE @xml AS XML = 
'<people>
   <person><firstName>Jon</firstName><lastName>Johnson</lastName></person>
   <person><firstName>Kathy</firstName><lastName>Carter</lastName></person>
   <person><firstName>Bob</firstName><lastName>Burns</lastName></person>
</people>';

SELECT x.i.value('(./text())[1]', 'VARCHAR(10)')
FROM @xml.nodes('./people/person/firstName') AS x(i);

If xml is not a variable but value in table, we first need to extract rows from this value, and this is when CROSS APPLY comes in handy:

SELECT x.i.value('(./text())[1]', 'VARCHAR(10)')
FROM MyTable as t
CROSS APPLY 
   t.SomeXmlColumn.nodes('./people/person/firstName') AS x(i);

CROSS APPLY operator applies the right expression to each record from the left table (MyTable).

  • In MyTable table there is one record containing xml.
  • CROSS APPLY fetches this record and exposes it to expression in the right.
  • Right expression extracts records using nodes() function.
  • As a result there are 1 x 3 = 3 records (xml nodes) which are then processed by SELECT clause.

Compare to 'normal' CROSS APPLY query:

SELECT c.CustomerID, soh.TotalDue, soh.OrderDate
FROM Sales.Customer AS c
CROSS APPLY
    (SELECT TOP(2) TotalDue, OrderDate
    FROM Sales.SalesOrderHeader
    WHERE CustomerID = c.CustomerID
ORDER BY TotalDue DESC) AS soh;

c.CustomerID is our t.SomeXmlColumn

5

The answer to your question is in your question.

The result of the nodes() method is a rowset

You can't do this either

WITH T(X) AS
(
SELECT 1
)
SELECT X, (SELECT 'A' AS Y UNION ALL SELECT 'B' AS Y)
FROM T

But you can do

WITH T(X) AS
(
SELECT 1
)
SELECT X, Y
FROM T
CROSS APPLY (SELECT 'A' AS Y UNION ALL SELECT 'B' AS Y) C

A straight SELECT ... FROM T can't add or subtract rows to the resultset no matter what functions you call in the SELECT list. That just isn't how SQL works.

0

I had exactly the same issue which you have. I couldn't get rows instead XML expression. I solved it by using query('.').value(...). On your code, I suppose it should be like this:

SELECT 
    MyDerivedTable.SomeOtherXmlColumn.query('.').value('/people/person')
FROM MyTable CROSS APPLY MyTable.SomeXmlColumn.nodes('/people/person')
AS MyDerivedTable(SomeOtherXmlColumn)

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