I am trying to find the bounding boxes of text in an image and am currently using this approach:

// calculate the local variances of the grayscale image
Mat t_mean, t_mean_2;
Mat grayF;
outImg_gray.convertTo(grayF, CV_32F);
int winSize = 35;
blur(grayF, t_mean, cv::Size(winSize,winSize));
blur(grayF.mul(grayF), t_mean_2, cv::Size(winSize,winSize));
Mat varMat = t_mean_2 - t_mean.mul(t_mean);
varMat.convertTo(varMat, CV_8U);

// threshold the high variance regions
Mat varMatRegions = varMat > 100;

When given an image like this:

enter image description here

Then when I show varMatRegions I get this image:

enter image description here

As you can see it somewhat combines the left block of text with the header of the card, for most cards this method works great but on busier cards it can cause problems.

The reason it is bad for those contours to connect is that it makes the bounding box of the contour nearly take up the entire card.

Can anyone suggest a different way I can find the text to ensure proper detection of text?

200 points to whoever can find the text in the card above the these two.

enter image description here enter image description here

  • 1
    The easiest way I see here is increasing the contrast before getting the regions... – Paweł Stawarz May 6 '14 at 23:38
  • 3
    Cool question. Thanks for posting it and hosting the bounty to ensure such interesting replies. – Geoff May 13 '14 at 13:40
  • @Geoff my pleasure! – Clip May 13 '14 at 21:53
  • New to programming. Can the same stuff be done for text in scripts other than English like Sanskrit? – Vamshi Krishna Aug 12 '16 at 8:14
up vote 106 down vote accepted
+200

You can detect text by finding close edge elements (inspired from a LPD):

#include "opencv2/opencv.hpp"

std::vector<cv::Rect> detectLetters(cv::Mat img)
{
    std::vector<cv::Rect> boundRect;
    cv::Mat img_gray, img_sobel, img_threshold, element;
    cvtColor(img, img_gray, CV_BGR2GRAY);
    cv::Sobel(img_gray, img_sobel, CV_8U, 1, 0, 3, 1, 0, cv::BORDER_DEFAULT);
    cv::threshold(img_sobel, img_threshold, 0, 255, CV_THRESH_OTSU+CV_THRESH_BINARY);
    element = getStructuringElement(cv::MORPH_RECT, cv::Size(17, 3) );
    cv::morphologyEx(img_threshold, img_threshold, CV_MOP_CLOSE, element); //Does the trick
    std::vector< std::vector< cv::Point> > contours;
    cv::findContours(img_threshold, contours, 0, 1); 
    std::vector<std::vector<cv::Point> > contours_poly( contours.size() );
    for( int i = 0; i < contours.size(); i++ )
        if (contours[i].size()>100)
        { 
            cv::approxPolyDP( cv::Mat(contours[i]), contours_poly[i], 3, true );
            cv::Rect appRect( boundingRect( cv::Mat(contours_poly[i]) ));
            if (appRect.width>appRect.height) 
                boundRect.push_back(appRect);
        }
    return boundRect;
}

Usage:

int main(int argc,char** argv)
{
    //Read
    cv::Mat img1=cv::imread("side_1.jpg");
    cv::Mat img2=cv::imread("side_2.jpg");
    //Detect
    std::vector<cv::Rect> letterBBoxes1=detectLetters(img1);
    std::vector<cv::Rect> letterBBoxes2=detectLetters(img2);
    //Display
    for(int i=0; i< letterBBoxes1.size(); i++)
        cv::rectangle(img1,letterBBoxes1[i],cv::Scalar(0,255,0),3,8,0);
    cv::imwrite( "imgOut1.jpg", img1);  
    for(int i=0; i< letterBBoxes2.size(); i++)
        cv::rectangle(img2,letterBBoxes2[i],cv::Scalar(0,255,0),3,8,0);
    cv::imwrite( "imgOut2.jpg", img2);  
    return 0;
}

Results:

a. element = getStructuringElement(cv::MORPH_RECT, cv::Size(17, 3) ); imgOut1 imgOut2

b. element = getStructuringElement(cv::MORPH_RECT, cv::Size(30, 30) ); imgOut1 imgOut2

Results are similar for the other image mentioned.

  • 5
    +1, nice result. BTW, what is LPD? – herohuyongtao May 9 '14 at 12:55
  • 6
    License Plate Detector. – William May 9 '14 at 13:01
  • 2
    For some cards the bounding box does not enclose all of the text, such as half a letter getting cut off. Such as this card: i.imgur.com/tX3XrwH.jpg How can I extend every bounding bounding boxes height and width by n? Thanks for the solution it works great! – Clip May 11 '14 at 16:22
  • 4
    Say cv::Rect a;. Enlarged by n: a.x-=n/2;a.y-=n/2;a.width+=n;a.height+=n;. – William May 12 '14 at 7:15
  • 3
    Book. Code. – William May 30 '16 at 7:16

I used a gradient based method in the program below. Added the resulting images. Please note that I'm using a scaled down version of the image for processing.

c++ version

The MIT License (MIT)

Copyright (c) 2014 Dhanushka Dangampola

Permission is hereby granted, free of charge, to any person obtaining a copy
of this software and associated documentation files (the "Software"), to deal
in the Software without restriction, including without limitation the rights
to use, copy, modify, merge, publish, distribute, sublicense, and/or sell
copies of the Software, and to permit persons to whom the Software is
furnished to do so, subject to the following conditions:

The above copyright notice and this permission notice shall be included in
all copies or substantial portions of the Software.

THE SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED "AS IS", WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EXPRESS OR
IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO THE WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY,
FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE AND NONINFRINGEMENT. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE
AUTHORS OR COPYRIGHT HOLDERS BE LIABLE FOR ANY CLAIM, DAMAGES OR OTHER
LIABILITY, WHETHER IN AN ACTION OF CONTRACT, TORT OR OTHERWISE, ARISING FROM,
OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THE SOFTWARE OR THE USE OR OTHER DEALINGS IN
THE SOFTWARE.

#include "stdafx.h"

#include <opencv2/core/core.hpp>
#include <opencv2/highgui/highgui.hpp>
#include <opencv2/imgproc/imgproc.hpp>
#include <iostream>

using namespace cv;
using namespace std;

#define INPUT_FILE              "1.jpg"
#define OUTPUT_FOLDER_PATH      string("")

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    Mat large = imread(INPUT_FILE);
    Mat rgb;
    // downsample and use it for processing
    pyrDown(large, rgb);
    Mat small;
    cvtColor(rgb, small, CV_BGR2GRAY);
    // morphological gradient
    Mat grad;
    Mat morphKernel = getStructuringElement(MORPH_ELLIPSE, Size(3, 3));
    morphologyEx(small, grad, MORPH_GRADIENT, morphKernel);
    // binarize
    Mat bw;
    threshold(grad, bw, 0.0, 255.0, THRESH_BINARY | THRESH_OTSU);
    // connect horizontally oriented regions
    Mat connected;
    morphKernel = getStructuringElement(MORPH_RECT, Size(9, 1));
    morphologyEx(bw, connected, MORPH_CLOSE, morphKernel);
    // find contours
    Mat mask = Mat::zeros(bw.size(), CV_8UC1);
    vector<vector<Point>> contours;
    vector<Vec4i> hierarchy;
    findContours(connected, contours, hierarchy, CV_RETR_CCOMP, CV_CHAIN_APPROX_SIMPLE, Point(0, 0));
    // filter contours
    for(int idx = 0; idx >= 0; idx = hierarchy[idx][0])
    {
        Rect rect = boundingRect(contours[idx]);
        Mat maskROI(mask, rect);
        maskROI = Scalar(0, 0, 0);
        // fill the contour
        drawContours(mask, contours, idx, Scalar(255, 255, 255), CV_FILLED);
        // ratio of non-zero pixels in the filled region
        double r = (double)countNonZero(maskROI)/(rect.width*rect.height);

        if (r > .45 /* assume at least 45% of the area is filled if it contains text */
            && 
            (rect.height > 8 && rect.width > 8) /* constraints on region size */
            /* these two conditions alone are not very robust. better to use something 
            like the number of significant peaks in a horizontal projection as a third condition */
            )
        {
            rectangle(rgb, rect, Scalar(0, 255, 0), 2);
        }
    }
    imwrite(OUTPUT_FOLDER_PATH + string("rgb.jpg"), rgb);

    return 0;
}

python version

The MIT License (MIT)

Copyright (c) 2017 Dhanushka Dangampola

Permission is hereby granted, free of charge, to any person obtaining a copy
of this software and associated documentation files (the "Software"), to deal
in the Software without restriction, including without limitation the rights
to use, copy, modify, merge, publish, distribute, sublicense, and/or sell
copies of the Software, and to permit persons to whom the Software is
furnished to do so, subject to the following conditions:

The above copyright notice and this permission notice shall be included in
all copies or substantial portions of the Software.

THE SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED "AS IS", WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EXPRESS OR
IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO THE WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY,
FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE AND NONINFRINGEMENT. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE
AUTHORS OR COPYRIGHT HOLDERS BE LIABLE FOR ANY CLAIM, DAMAGES OR OTHER
LIABILITY, WHETHER IN AN ACTION OF CONTRACT, TORT OR OTHERWISE, ARISING FROM,
OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THE SOFTWARE OR THE USE OR OTHER DEALINGS IN
THE SOFTWARE.

import cv2
import numpy as np

large = cv2.imread('1.jpg')
rgb = cv2.pyrDown(large)
small = cv2.cvtColor(rgb, cv2.COLOR_BGR2GRAY)

kernel = cv2.getStructuringElement(cv2.MORPH_ELLIPSE, (3, 3))
grad = cv2.morphologyEx(small, cv2.MORPH_GRADIENT, kernel)

_, bw = cv2.threshold(grad, 0.0, 255.0, cv2.THRESH_BINARY | cv2.THRESH_OTSU)

kernel = cv2.getStructuringElement(cv2.MORPH_RECT, (9, 1))
connected = cv2.morphologyEx(bw, cv2.MORPH_CLOSE, kernel)
# using RETR_EXTERNAL instead of RETR_CCOMP
contours, hierarchy = cv2.findContours(connected.copy(), cv2.RETR_EXTERNAL, cv2.CHAIN_APPROX_NONE)

mask = np.zeros(bw.shape, dtype=np.uint8)

for idx in range(len(contours)):
    x, y, w, h = cv2.boundingRect(contours[idx])
    mask[y:y+h, x:x+w] = 0
    cv2.drawContours(mask, contours, idx, (255, 255, 255), -1)
    r = float(cv2.countNonZero(mask[y:y+h, x:x+w])) / (w * h)

    if r > 0.45 and w > 8 and h > 8:
        cv2.rectangle(rgb, (x, y), (x+w-1, y+h-1), (0, 255, 0), 2)

cv2.imshow('rects', rgb)

enter image description here enter image description here enter image description here

  • 2
    +1, the most accurate result up to now, good work! :P – herohuyongtao May 15 '14 at 10:31
  • 3
    I just had a look at his approach. Main difference I see is that he's using a Sobel filter whereas I'm using a morphological gradient filter. I think the morphological filter and downsampling flattens out much of the not-so-strong edges. Sobel might pick up more noise. – dhanushka May 16 '14 at 16:34
  • 1
    @ascenator When you combine OTSU with the threshold type, it uses the Otsu's threshold instead of the specified threshold value. See here. – dhanushka Jul 29 '16 at 1:06
  • 1
    @VishnuJayanand You just have to apply a scaling to the rect. There's one pyrdown, so multiply x, y, width, height of the rect by 4. – dhanushka Mar 16 at 6:54
  • 2
    @DforTye Take the horizontal projection of the filled contour (cv::reduce), then threshold it (say, using mean or median height). If you visualize this result, it'll look like a barcode. I think, at the time, I was thinking of counting the number of bars, and imposing a threshold on it. Now I think, if the region is clean enough, it may also help if we can feed it to an OCR and get a confidence level for each detected character to be sure that the region contains text. – dhanushka Jun 5 at 12:39

Here is an alternative approach that I used to detect the text blocks:

  1. Converted the image to grayscale
  2. Applied threshold (simple binary threshold, with a handpicked value of 150 as the threshold value)
  3. Applied dilation to thicken lines in image, leading to more compact objects and less white space fragments. Used a high value for number of iterations, so dilation is very heavy (13 iterations, also handpicked for optimal results).
  4. Identified contours of objects in resulted image using opencv findContours function.
  5. Drew a bounding box (rectangle) circumscribing each contoured object - each of them frames a block of text.
  6. Optionally discarded areas that are unlikely to be the object you are searching for (e.g. text blocks) given their size, as the algorithm above can also find intersecting or nested objects (like the entire top area for the first card) some of which could be uninteresting for your purposes.

Below is the code written in python with pyopencv, it should easy to port to C++.

import cv2

image = cv2.imread("card.png")
gray = cv2.cvtColor(image,cv2.COLOR_BGR2GRAY) # grayscale
_,thresh = cv2.threshold(gray,150,255,cv2.THRESH_BINARY_INV) # threshold
kernel = cv2.getStructuringElement(cv2.MORPH_CROSS,(3,3))
dilated = cv2.dilate(thresh,kernel,iterations = 13) # dilate
_, contours, hierarchy = cv2.findContours(dilated,cv2.RETR_EXTERNAL,cv2.CHAIN_APPROX_NONE) # get contours

# for each contour found, draw a rectangle around it on original image
for contour in contours:
    # get rectangle bounding contour
    [x,y,w,h] = cv2.boundingRect(contour)

    # discard areas that are too large
    if h>300 and w>300:
        continue

    # discard areas that are too small
    if h<40 or w<40:
        continue

    # draw rectangle around contour on original image
    cv2.rectangle(image,(x,y),(x+w,y+h),(255,0,255),2)

# write original image with added contours to disk  
cv2.imwrite("contoured.jpg", image) 

The original image is the first image in your post.

After preprocessing (grayscale, threshold and dilate - so after step 3) the image looked like this:

Dilated image

Below is the resulted image ("contoured.jpg" in the last line); the final bounding boxes for the objects in the image look like this:

enter image description here

You can see the text block on the left is detected as a separate block, delimited from its surroundings.

Using the same script with the same parameters (except for thresholding type that was changed for the second image like described below), here are the results for the other 2 cards:

enter image description here

enter image description here

Tuning the parameters

The parameters (threshold value, dilation parameters) were optimized for this image and this task (finding text blocks) and can be adjusted, if needed, for other cards images or other types of objects to be found.

For thresholding (step 2), I used a black threshold. For images where text is lighter than the background, such as the second image in your post, a white threshold should be used, so replace thesholding type with cv2.THRESH_BINARY). For the second image I also used a slightly higher value for the threshold (180). Varying the parameters for the threshold value and the number of iterations for dilation will result in different degrees of sensitivity in delimiting objects in the image.

Finding other object types:

For example, decreasing the dilation to 5 iterations in the first image gives us a more fine delimitation of objects in the image, roughly finding all words in the image (rather than text blocks):

enter image description here

Knowing the rough size of a word, here I discarded areas that were too small (below 20 pixels width or height) or too large (above 100 pixels width or height) to ignore objects that are unlikely to be words, to get the results in the above image.

  • You are amazing! I will try this in the morning. – Clip May 9 '14 at 5:54
  • I added another step for discarding uninteresting objects; also added example for identifying words or other types of objects (than blocks of text) – anana May 9 '14 at 17:09
  • Thanks for the detailed answer, however I am getting an error in cv2.findContours. It says ValueError: too many values to unpack. – Abhijith Mar 22 '17 at 9:59
  • 1
    The issue is the function cv2.findContours returns 3 arguments, and the original code captures only 2. – Abhijith Mar 23 '17 at 16:02
  • Thanks @Abhijith - I edited the answer – anana Apr 6 '17 at 20:09

@dhanushka's approach showed the most promise but I wanted to play around in Python so went ahead and translated it for fun:

import cv2
import numpy as np
from cv2 import boundingRect, countNonZero, cvtColor, drawContours, findContours, getStructuringElement, imread, morphologyEx, pyrDown, rectangle, threshold

large = imread(image_path)
# downsample and use it for processing
rgb = pyrDown(large)
# apply grayscale
small = cvtColor(rgb, cv2.COLOR_BGR2GRAY)
# morphological gradient
morph_kernel = getStructuringElement(cv2.MORPH_ELLIPSE, (3, 3))
grad = morphologyEx(small, cv2.MORPH_GRADIENT, morph_kernel)
# binarize
_, bw = threshold(src=grad, thresh=0, maxval=255, type=cv2.THRESH_BINARY+cv2.THRESH_OTSU)
morph_kernel = getStructuringElement(cv2.MORPH_RECT, (9, 1))
# connect horizontally oriented regions
connected = morphologyEx(bw, cv2.MORPH_CLOSE, morph_kernel)
mask = np.zeros(bw.shape, np.uint8)
# find contours
im2, contours, hierarchy = findContours(connected, cv2.RETR_CCOMP, cv2.CHAIN_APPROX_SIMPLE)
# filter contours
for idx in range(0, len(hierarchy[0])):
    rect = x, y, rect_width, rect_height = boundingRect(contours[idx])
    # fill the contour
    mask = drawContours(mask, contours, idx, (255, 255, 2555), cv2.FILLED)
    # ratio of non-zero pixels in the filled region
    r = float(countNonZero(mask)) / (rect_width * rect_height)
    if r > 0.45 and rect_height > 8 and rect_width > 8:
        rgb = rectangle(rgb, (x, y+rect_height), (x+rect_width, y), (0,255,0),3)

Now to display the image:

from PIL import Image
Image.fromarray(rgb).show()

Not the most Pythonic of scripts but I tried to resemble the original C++ code as closely as possible for readers to follow.

It works almost as well as the original. I'll be happy to read suggestions how it could be improved/fixed to resemble the original results fully.

enter image description here

enter image description here

enter image description here

  • 2
    Thank you for providing a python version. Many people will find this useful. +1 – dhanushka Apr 8 '17 at 5:11
  • what's the difference between filling the contour and drawing it? I found a code without the filling phase here: stackoverflow.com/a/23556997/6837132 – SarahData Sep 6 '17 at 9:46
  • @SarahM I don't know if you are asking about the generic diff between drawing and filling (fairly obvious I think?) or the OpenCV API specifically? If the latter then see the docs for drawContours that state "The function draws contour outlines in the image if thickness > 0 or fills the area bounded by the contours if thickness < 0." It's done so we can check the ratio of non-zero pixels to decide if the box likely contains text. – rtkaleta Sep 12 '17 at 12:20

You can try this method that is developed by Chucai Yi and Yingli Tian.

They also share a software (which is based on Opencv-1.0 and it should run under Windows platform.) that you can use (though no source code available). It will generate all the text bounding boxes (shown in color shadows) in the image. By applying to your sample images, you will get the following results:

Note: to make the result more robust, you can further merge adjacent boxes together.


Update: If your ultimate goal is to recognize the texts in the image, you can further check out gttext, which is an OCR free software and Ground Truthing tool for Color Images with Text. Source code is also available.

With this, you can get recognized texts like:

Above Code JAVA version: Thanks @William

public static List<Rect> detectLetters(Mat img){    
    List<Rect> boundRect=new ArrayList<>();

    Mat img_gray =new Mat(), img_sobel=new Mat(), img_threshold=new Mat(), element=new Mat();
    Imgproc.cvtColor(img, img_gray, Imgproc.COLOR_RGB2GRAY);
    Imgproc.Sobel(img_gray, img_sobel, CvType.CV_8U, 1, 0, 3, 1, 0, Core.BORDER_DEFAULT);
    //at src, Mat dst, double thresh, double maxval, int type
    Imgproc.threshold(img_sobel, img_threshold, 0, 255, 8);
    element=Imgproc.getStructuringElement(Imgproc.MORPH_RECT, new Size(15,5));
    Imgproc.morphologyEx(img_threshold, img_threshold, Imgproc.MORPH_CLOSE, element);
    List<MatOfPoint> contours = new ArrayList<MatOfPoint>();
    Mat hierarchy = new Mat();
    Imgproc.findContours(img_threshold, contours,hierarchy, 0, 1);

    List<MatOfPoint> contours_poly = new ArrayList<MatOfPoint>(contours.size());

     for( int i = 0; i < contours.size(); i++ ){             

         MatOfPoint2f  mMOP2f1=new MatOfPoint2f();
         MatOfPoint2f  mMOP2f2=new MatOfPoint2f();

         contours.get(i).convertTo(mMOP2f1, CvType.CV_32FC2);
         Imgproc.approxPolyDP(mMOP2f1, mMOP2f2, 2, true); 
         mMOP2f2.convertTo(contours.get(i), CvType.CV_32S);


            Rect appRect = Imgproc.boundingRect(contours.get(i));
            if (appRect.width>appRect.height) {
                boundRect.add(appRect);
            }
     }

    return boundRect;
}

And use this code in practice :

        System.loadLibrary(Core.NATIVE_LIBRARY_NAME);
        Mat img1=Imgcodecs.imread("abc.png");
        List<Rect> letterBBoxes1=Utils.detectLetters(img1);

        for(int i=0; i< letterBBoxes1.size(); i++)
            Imgproc.rectangle(img1,letterBBoxes1.get(i).br(), letterBBoxes1.get(i).tl(),new Scalar(0,255,0),3,8,0);         
        Imgcodecs.imwrite("abc1.png", img1);

Python Implementation for @dhanushka's solution:

def process_rgb(rgb):
hasText = 0
gray = cv2.cvtColor(rgb, cv2.COLOR_BGR2GRAY);
morphKernel = cv2.getStructuringElement(cv2.MORPH_ELLIPSE, (3,3))
grad = cv2.morphologyEx(gray, cv2.MORPH_GRADIENT, morphKernel)
# binarize
_, bw = cv2.threshold(grad, 0.0, 255.0, cv2.THRESH_BINARY | cv2.THRESH_OTSU)
# connect horizontally oriented regions
morphKernel = cv2.getStructuringElement(cv2.MORPH_RECT, (9, 1))
connected = cv2.morphologyEx(bw, cv2.MORPH_CLOSE, morphKernel)
# find contours
mask = np.zeros(bw.shape[:2], dtype="uint8");
_,contours, hierarchy = cv2.findContours(connected, cv2.RETR_CCOMP, cv2.CHAIN_APPROX_SIMPLE)
# filter contours
idx = 0
while idx >= 0:
    x,y,w,h = cv2.boundingRect(contours[idx]);
    # fill the contour
    cv2.drawContours(mask, contours, idx, (255, 255, 255), cv2.FILLED);
    # ratio of non-zero pixels in the filled region
    r = cv2.contourArea(contours[idx])/(w*h)
    if(r > 0.45 and h > 5 and w > 5 and w > h):
        cv2.rectangle(rgb, (x,y), (x+w,y+h), (0, 255, 0), 2)
        hasText = 1
    idx = hierarchy[0][idx][0]
return hasText, rgb

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