I am using annotations to configure my spring environment like this:

@Configuration
...
@PropertySource("classpath:/config/default.properties")
...
public class GeneralApplicationConfiguration implements WebApplicationInitializer 
{
    @Autowired
    Environment env;
}

This leads to my properties from default.properties being part of the Environment. I want to use the @PropertySource mechanism here, because it already provides the possibility to overload properties through several fallback layers and different dynamic locations, based on the environment settings (e.g. config_dir location). I just stripped the fallback to make the example easier.

However, my problem now is that I want to configure for example my datasource properties in default.properties. You can pass the settings to the datasource without knowing in detail what settings the datasource expects using

Properties p = ...
datasource.setProperties(p);

However, the problem is, the Environment object is neither a Properties object nor a Map nor anything comparable. From my point of view it is simply not possible to access all values of the environment, because there is no keySet or iterator method or anything comparable.

Properties p <=== Environment env?

Am I missing something? Is it possible to access all entries of the Environment object somehow? If yes, I could map the entries to a Map or Properties object, I could even filter or map them by prefix - create subsets as a standard java Map ... This is what I would like to do. Any suggestions?

up vote 54 down vote accepted

You need something like this, maybe it can be improved this is a first attempt:

...
import org.springframework.core.env.PropertySource;
import org.springframework.core.env.AbstractEnvironment;
import org.springframework.core.env.Environment;
import org.springframework.core.env.MapPropertySource;
...

@Configuration
...
@org.springframework.context.annotation.PropertySource("classpath:/config/default.properties")
...
public class GeneralApplicationConfiguration implements WebApplicationInitializer 
{
    @Autowired
    Environment env;

    public void someMethod() {
        ...
        Map<String, Object> map = new HashMap();
        for(Iterator it = ((AbstractEnvironment) env).getPropertySources().iterator(); it.hasNext(); ) {
            PropertySource propertySource = (PropertySource) it.next();
            if (propertySource instanceof MapPropertySource) {
                map.putAll(((MapPropertySource) propertySource).getSource());
            }
        }
        ...
    }
...

Basically, everything from the Environment that's a MapPropertySource (and there are quite a lot of implementations) can be accessed as a Map of properties.

  • Thanks for sharing this approach. I concider this as a bit "dirty" but it is probably the only way to go here. Another approach a colleague showed me would be to put a property into the configuration using a fixed key that holds a list with all property keys. You could then read the properties into a Map/Properties object based on the keylist. That would at least prevent the casts ... – RoK May 8 '14 at 23:08
  • 16
    Note for Spring boot ... that getPropertySources() returns the PropertySource in the precedence order so you effectively need to reverse that in the cases where property values are overwritten – Rob Bygrave Oct 27 '15 at 9:40
  • 1
    As @RobBygrave mentioned the order might be different, but instead of reverting the order(since you can deploy spring boot to container as war or this behaviour can change in future) I would just collect all keys and then use applicationContext.getEnvironment().getProperty(key) to resolve them – potato Mar 4 '16 at 11:02
  • @potato That's a good idea, and I tried that. The only potential problem is that you run into evaluation issues with placeholders, like in this question here: stackoverflow.com/questions/34584498/… – bischoje Mar 15 '16 at 16:46
  • 1
    Thank you!.. I was looking for a spring alternative to use in place of org.apache.ibatis.io.Resources.getResourceAsProperties("Filepath") This solution worked very well for me. – so-random-dude Oct 24 '16 at 7:01

This is an old question, but the accepted answer has a serious flaw. If the Spring Environment object contains any overriding values (as described in Externalized Configuration), there is no guarantee that the map of property values it produces will match those returned from the Environment object. I found that simply iterating through the PropertySources of the Environment did not, in fact, give any overriding values. Instead it produced the original value, the one that should have been overridden.

Here is a better solution. This uses the EnumerablePropertySources of the Environment to iterate through the known property names, but then reads the actual value out of the real Spring environment. This guarantees that the value is the one actually resolved by Spring, including any overriding values.

Properties props = new Properties();
MutablePropertySources propSrcs = ((AbstractEnvironment) springEnv).getPropertySources();
StreamSupport.stream(propSrcs.spliterator(), false)
        .filter(ps -> ps instanceof EnumerablePropertySource)
        .map(ps -> ((EnumerablePropertySource) ps).getPropertyNames())
        .flatMap(Arrays::<String>stream)
        .forEach(propName -> props.setProperty(propName, springEnv.getProperty(propName)));
  • 1
    It's worth noting that as of Spring 4.1.2, this solution (unlike the other answers) doesn't need to be updated to explicitly deal with CompositePropertySource, as CompositePropertySource extends EnumerablePropertySource and therefore getPropertyNames will return the set of all property names in the composite source. – M. Justin Mar 22 '17 at 19:17
  • 3
    You could also collect the properties using the built-in collect method on the stream instead of doing a forEach: .distinct().collect(Collectors.toMap(Function.identity(), springEnv::getProperty)). If you needed to collect it into a Properties instead of a Map you could use the four-argument version of collect. – M. Justin Mar 22 '17 at 20:04
  • 2
    What's springEnv? Where does it come from? Does it differ from the env of the accepted solution? – sebnukem Jan 25 at 20:43
  • 2
    @sebnukem Good point. springEnv is the env object of the original question & accepted solution. I suppose I should have kept the name the same. – pedorro Jan 25 at 20:59
  • 2
    You could use ConfigurableEnvironment and not have to do the cast. – Abhijit Sarkar Mar 27 at 23:52

I had the requirement to retrieve all properties whose key starts with a distinct prefix (e.g. all properties starting with "log4j.appender.") and wrote following Code (using streams and lamdas of Java 8).

public static Map<String,Object> getPropertiesStartingWith( ConfigurableEnvironment aEnv,
                                                            String aKeyPrefix )
{
    Map<String,Object> result = new HashMap<>();

    Map<String,Object> map = getAllProperties( aEnv );

    for (Entry<String, Object> entry : map.entrySet())
    {
        String key = entry.getKey();

        if ( key.startsWith( aKeyPrefix ) )
        {
            result.put( key, entry.getValue() );
        }
    }

    return result;
}

public static Map<String,Object> getAllProperties( ConfigurableEnvironment aEnv )
{
    Map<String,Object> result = new HashMap<>();
    aEnv.getPropertySources().forEach( ps -> addAll( result, getAllProperties( ps ) ) );
    return result;
}

public static Map<String,Object> getAllProperties( PropertySource<?> aPropSource )
{
    Map<String,Object> result = new HashMap<>();

    if ( aPropSource instanceof CompositePropertySource)
    {
        CompositePropertySource cps = (CompositePropertySource) aPropSource;
        cps.getPropertySources().forEach( ps -> addAll( result, getAllProperties( ps ) ) );
        return result;
    }

    if ( aPropSource instanceof EnumerablePropertySource<?> )
    {
        EnumerablePropertySource<?> ps = (EnumerablePropertySource<?>) aPropSource;
        Arrays.asList( ps.getPropertyNames() ).forEach( key -> result.put( key, ps.getProperty( key ) ) );
        return result;
    }

    // note: Most descendants of PropertySource are EnumerablePropertySource. There are some
    // few others like JndiPropertySource or StubPropertySource
    myLog.debug( "Given PropertySource is instanceof " + aPropSource.getClass().getName()
                 + " and cannot be iterated" );

    return result;

}

private static void addAll( Map<String, Object> aBase, Map<String, Object> aToBeAdded )
{
    for (Entry<String, Object> entry : aToBeAdded.entrySet())
    {
        if ( aBase.containsKey( entry.getKey() ) )
        {
            continue;
        }

        aBase.put( entry.getKey(), entry.getValue() );
    }
}

Note that the starting point is the ConfigurableEnvironment which is able to return the embedded PropertySources (the ConfigurableEnvironment is a direct descendant of Environment). You can autowire it by:

@Autowired
private ConfigurableEnvironment  myEnv;

If you not using very special kinds of property sources (like JndiPropertySource, which is usually not used in spring autoconfiguration) you can retrieve all properties held in the environment.

The implementation relies on the iteration order which spring itself provides and takes the first found property, all later found properties with the same name are discarded. This should ensure the same behaviour as if the environment were asked directly for a property (returning the first found one).

Note also that the returned properties are not yet resolved if they contain aliases with the ${...} operator. If you want to have a particular key resolved you have to ask the Environment directly again:

myEnv.getProperty( key );
  • Why not just discover all the keys this way and then use environment.getProperty to force appropriate value resolution? Would want to ensure that environment overrides are respected, e.g. application-dev.properties overrides a default value in application.properties and as you mentioned placeholder eval. – GameSalutes Jan 9 '17 at 21:03
  • That's what I pointed out in the last paragraph. Using env.getProperty ensures the original behaviour of Spring. – Heri Jan 10 '17 at 7:25

As this Spring's Jira ticket, it is an intentional design. But the following code works for me.

public static Map<String, Object> getAllKnownProperties(Environment env) {
    Map<String, Object> rtn = new HashMap<>();
    if (env instanceof ConfigurableEnvironment) {
        for (PropertySource<?> propertySource : ((ConfigurableEnvironment) env).getPropertySources()) {
            if (propertySource instanceof EnumerablePropertySource) {
                for (String key : ((EnumerablePropertySource) propertySource).getPropertyNames()) {
                    rtn.put(key, propertySource.getProperty(key));
                }
            }
        }
    }
    return rtn;
}

Try the following code:

...
@Autowired
private Environment env;
...
for(Iterator<PropertySource<?>> it = ((AbstractEnvironment) env).getPropertySources().iterator(); it.hasNext(); ) {
    PropertySource<?> propertySource = (PropertySource<?>) it.next();
    if (propertySource instanceof CompositePropertySource) {
        for(Iterator<PropertySource<?>> it2 = ((CompositePropertySource) propertySource).getPropertySources().iterator(); it2.hasNext(); ) {
            PropertySource<?> propertySource2 = (PropertySource<?>) it2.next();
            if (propertySource2 instanceof ResourcePropertySource) {
                for (Entry<String, Object> entry : ((ResourcePropertySource)propertySource2).getSource().entrySet()) {
                    if (entry.getValue() instanceof String) { 
                        System.out.println(entry.getKey() + "=" + (String)entry.getValue());
                    }
                }
            }
        }
    }
}
  • 4
    While your answer may solve the question, it is always better if you can provide a description of what the issue was and how your answer solves it. This is a suggestion for further improving this and future answers. – Luís Cruz Oct 10 '14 at 15:30

The other answers have pointed out the solution for the majority of cases involving PropertySources, but none have mentioned that certain property sources are unable to be casted into useful types.

One such example is the property source for command line arguments. The class that is used is SimpleCommandLinePropertySource. This private class is returned by a public method, thus making it extremely tricky to access the data inside the object. I had to use reflection in order to read the data and eventually replace the property source.

If anyone out there has a better solution, I would really like to see it; however, this is the only hack I have gotten to work.

Working with Spring Boot 2, I needed to do something similar. Most of the answers above work fine, just beware that at various phases in the app lifecycles the results will be different.

For example, after a ApplicationEnvironmentPreparedEvent any properties inside application.properties are not present. However, after a ApplicationPreparedEvent event they are.

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