41

I just can't see why do we need to use @staticmethod. Let's start with an exmaple.

class test1:
    def __init__(self,value):
        self.value=value

    @staticmethod
    def static_add_one(value):
        return value+1

    @property
    def new_val(self):
        self.value=self.static_add_one(self.value)
        return self.value


a=test1(3)
print(a.new_val) ## >>> 4



class test2:
    def __init__(self,value):
        self.value=value

    def static_add_one(self,value):
        return value+1

    @property
    def new_val(self):
        self.value=self.static_add_one(self.value)
        return self.value


b=test2(3)
print(b.new_val) ## >>> 4

In the example above, the method, static_add_one , in the two classes do not require the instance of the class(self) in calculation.

The method static_add_one in the class test1 is decorated by @staticmethod and work properly.

But at the same time, the method static_add_one in the class test2 which has no @staticmethod decoration also works properly by using a trick that provides a self in the argument but doesn't use it at all.

So what is the benefit of using @staticmethod? Does it improve the performance? Or is it just due to the zen of python which states that "Explicit is better than implicit"?

5
  • 1
    For the most part, just use module-level functions and forget @staticmethods exist.
    – roippi
    May 7, 2014 at 3:44
  • 9
    To make java programmers happy. May 7, 2014 at 3:51
  • 2
    @Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams : May I ask for the reason of why we shouldn't use test.static_add_one?
    – Ken T
    May 7, 2014 at 4:27
  • 1
    Because adding 1 to an arbitrary object has essentially nothing to do with the class. May 7, 2014 at 4:29
  • 1
    @Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Some method doesn't require the class but the class requires those methods to perform some calculation. Where should I put those methods? Module-level? Or do you mean I should write functions like get_new_value() and set_new_value(value) which interact with the instance of class directly?
    – Ken T
    May 7, 2014 at 4:53

5 Answers 5

73

The reason to use staticmethod is if you have something that could be written as a standalone function (not part of any class), but you want to keep it within the class because it's somehow semantically related to the class. (For instance, it could be a function that doesn't require any information from the class, but whose behavior is specific to the class, so that subclasses might want to override it.) In many cases, it could make just as much sense to write something as a standalone function instead of a staticmethod.

Your example isn't really the same. A key difference is that, even though you don't use self, you still need an instance to call static_add_one --- you can't call it directly on the class with test2.static_add_one(1). So there is a genuine difference in behavior there. The most serious "rival" to a staticmethod isn't a regular method that ignores self, but a standalone function.

4
  • 9
    +1 This is on target. We use staticmethods to attach regular functions to a class. This improved findability for a function that is strongly related to a class but doesn't depend on it. May 7, 2014 at 3:48
  • So if a have a function with two characteristics - standalone and semantically related to a class. To obey the characteristic of semantical similarity, I should put it inside a class. To obey the characteristic of standalone, I should use a @staticmethod decorator instead of passing a dummy self argument in it since the argument self somehow fades away its color of standalone. But afterall, no much performance gain, right?
    – Ken T
    May 7, 2014 at 4:24
  • 1
    @user2720402: Roughly, yes, if I understand you right. Performance is not a reason to use or not use a staticmethod. You should choose whether or not to use a staticmethod based on the function's conceptual relation with a class (or lack thereof).
    – BrenBarn
    May 7, 2014 at 4:52
  • Even when I don't add @staticmethod the functions still work even without the decorator. Is tehre any advantage to it?
    – Ary Jazz
    Mar 27, 2022 at 13:08
22

Today I suddenly find a benefit of using @staticmethod.

If you created a staticmethod within a class, you don't need to create an instance of the class before using the staticmethod.

For example,

class File1:
    def __init__(self, path):
        out=self.parse(path)

    def parse(self, path):
        ..parsing works..
        return x

class File2:
    def __init__(self, path):
        out=self.parse(path)

    @staticmethod
    def parse(path):
        ..parsing works..
        return x

if __name__=='__main__':
    path='abc.txt'
    File1.parse(path) #TypeError: unbound method parse() ....
    File2.parse(path) #Goal!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Since the method parse is strongly related to the classes File1 and File2, it is more natural to put it inside the class. However, sometimes this parse method may also be used in other classes under some circumstances. If you want to do so using File1, you must create an instance of File1 before calling the method parse. While using staticmethod in the class File2, you may directly call the method by using the syntax File2.parse.

This makes your works more convenient and natural.

2
  • 3
    This is all also true of @classmethod. The distinction is that @classmethods get passed the class instance and @staticmethods don't get passed anything special.
    – LondonRob
    Jan 20, 2022 at 14:46
  • 2
    Can't you remove @staticmethod and get the same result? Sep 5, 2023 at 18:14
3

I will add something other answers didn't mention. It's not only a matter of modularity, of putting something next to other logically related parts. It's also that the method could be non-static at other point of the hierarchy (i.e. in a subclass or superclass) and thus participate in polymorphism (type based dispatching). So if you put that function outside the class you will be precluding subclasses from effectively overriding it. Now, say you realize you don't need self in function C.f of class C, you have three two options:

  1. Put it outside the class. But we just decided against this.

  2. Do nothing new: while unused, still keep the self parameter.

  3. Declare you are not using the self parameter, while still letting other C methods to call f as self.f, which is required if you wish to keep open the possibility of further overrides of f that do depend on some instance state.

Option 2 demands less conceptual baggage (you already have to know about self and methods-as-bound-functions, because it's the more general case). But you still may prefer to be explicit about self not being using (and the interpreter could even reward you with some optimization, not having to partially apply a function to self). In that case, you pick option 3 and add @staticmethod on top of your function.

2

Use @staticmethod for methods that don't need to operate on a specific object, but that you still want located in the scope of the class (as opposed to module scope).

Your example in test2.static_add_one wastes its time passing an unused self parameter, but otherwise works the same as test1.static_add_one. Note that this extraneous parameter can't be optimized away.

One example I can think of is in a Django project I have, where a model class represents a database table, and an object of that class represents a record. There are some functions used by the class that are stand-alone and do not need an object to operate on, for example a function that converts a title into a "slug", which is a representation of the title that follows the character set limits imposed by URL syntax. The function that converts a title to a slug is declared as a staticmethod precisely to strongly associate it with the class that uses it.

-1

I think you hit it on the head here:

But at the same time, the method static_add_one in the class test2 which has no @staticmethod decoration also works properly by using a trick that provides a self in the argument but doesn't use it at all.

As you said, @staticmethod provides the self parameter implicitly so that you can call the method from an instance instead of the class and not have to explicitly write the self parameter. Per https://docs.python.org/3/library/functions.html#staticmethod:

A static method can be called either on the class (such as C.f()) or on an instance (such as C().f()).

For C().f() to work, you either need to decorate f() with @staticmethod (or explicitly call staticmethod()) or explicitly add the self parameter as you have done in your example.

1
  • This question is almost a decade old with several existing answers. What does this add that isn't already covered? Sep 5, 2023 at 18:33

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