46

I am trying to calculate time based aggregations in Pandas based on date values stored in a separate tables.

The top of the first table table_a looks like this:

    COMPANY_ID  DATE            MEASURE
    1   2010-01-01 00:00:00     10
    1   2010-01-02 00:00:00     10
    1   2010-01-03 00:00:00     10
    1   2010-01-04 00:00:00     10
    1   2010-01-05 00:00:00     10

Here is the code to create the table:

    table_a = pd.concat(\
    [pd.DataFrame({'DATE': pd.date_range("01/01/2010", "12/31/2010", freq="D"),\
    'COMPANY_ID': 1 , 'MEASURE': 10}),\
    pd.DataFrame({'DATE': pd.date_range("01/01/2010", "12/31/2010", freq="D"),\
    'COMPANY_ID': 2 , 'MEASURE': 10})])

The second table, table_b looks like this:

        COMPANY     END_DATE
        1   2010-03-01 00:00:00
        1   2010-06-02 00:00:00
        2   2010-03-01 00:00:00
        2   2010-06-02 00:00:00

and the code to create it is:

    table_b = pd.DataFrame({'END_DATE':pd.to_datetime(['03/01/2010','06/02/2010','03/01/2010','06/02/2010']),\
                    'COMPANY':(1,1,2,2)})

I want to be able to get the sum of the measure column for each COMPANY_ID for each 30 day period prior to the END_DATE in table_b.

This is (I think) the SQL equivalent:

      select
 b.COMPANY_ID,
 b.DATE
 sum(a.MEASURE) AS MEASURE_TO_END_DATE
 from table_a a, table_b b
 where a.COMPANY = b.COMPANY and
       a.DATE < b.DATE and
       a.DATE > b.DATE - 30  
 group by b.COMPANY;

Thanks for any help

2
  • Does end_date in table_b every have overlapping windows; e.g., could company 1 have an end_date's of 2010-03-01 and 2010-03-15. – Karl D. May 7 '14 at 4:32
  • Hi @KarlD yes potentially. – JAB May 7 '14 at 4:43
68

Well, I can think of a few ways:

  1. essentially blow up the dataframe by just merging on the exact field (company)... then filter on the 30-day windows after the merge.
  • should be fast but could use lots of memory
  1. Move the merging and filtering on the 30-day window into a groupby().
  • results in a merge for each group, so slower but should use less memory

Option #1

Suppose your data looks like the following (I expanded your sample data):

print df

    company       date  measure
0         0 2010-01-01       10
1         0 2010-01-15       10
2         0 2010-02-01       10
3         0 2010-02-15       10
4         0 2010-03-01       10
5         0 2010-03-15       10
6         0 2010-04-01       10
7         1 2010-03-01        5
8         1 2010-03-15        5
9         1 2010-04-01        5
10        1 2010-04-15        5
11        1 2010-05-01        5
12        1 2010-05-15        5

print windows

   company   end_date
0        0 2010-02-01
1        0 2010-03-15
2        1 2010-04-01
3        1 2010-05-15

Create a beginning date for the 30 day windows:

windows['beg_date'] = (windows['end_date'].values.astype('datetime64[D]') -
                       np.timedelta64(30,'D'))
print windows

   company   end_date   beg_date
0        0 2010-02-01 2010-01-02
1        0 2010-03-15 2010-02-13
2        1 2010-04-01 2010-03-02
3        1 2010-05-15 2010-04-15

Now do a merge and then select based on if date falls within beg_date and end_date:

df = df.merge(windows,on='company',how='left')
df = df[(df.date >= df.beg_date) & (df.date <= df.end_date)]
print df

    company       date  measure   end_date   beg_date
2         0 2010-01-15       10 2010-02-01 2010-01-02
4         0 2010-02-01       10 2010-02-01 2010-01-02
7         0 2010-02-15       10 2010-03-15 2010-02-13
9         0 2010-03-01       10 2010-03-15 2010-02-13
11        0 2010-03-15       10 2010-03-15 2010-02-13
16        1 2010-03-15        5 2010-04-01 2010-03-02
18        1 2010-04-01        5 2010-04-01 2010-03-02
21        1 2010-04-15        5 2010-05-15 2010-04-15
23        1 2010-05-01        5 2010-05-15 2010-04-15
25        1 2010-05-15        5 2010-05-15 2010-04-15

You can compute the 30 day window sums by grouping on company and end_date:

print df.groupby(['company','end_date']).sum()

                    measure
company end_date           
0       2010-02-01       20
        2010-03-15       30
1       2010-04-01       10
        2010-05-15       15

Option #2 Move all merging into a groupby. This should be better on memory but I would think much slower:

windows['beg_date'] = (windows['end_date'].values.astype('datetime64[D]') -
                       np.timedelta64(30,'D'))

def cond_merge(g,windows):
    g = g.merge(windows,on='company',how='left')
    g = g[(g.date >= g.beg_date) & (g.date <= g.end_date)]
    return g.groupby('end_date')['measure'].sum()

print df.groupby('company').apply(cond_merge,windows)

company  end_date  
0        2010-02-01    20
         2010-03-15    30
1        2010-04-01    10
         2010-05-15    15

Another option Now if your windows never overlap (like in the example data), you could do something like the following as an alternative that doesn't blow up a dataframe but is pretty fast:

windows['date'] = windows['end_date']

df = df.merge(windows,on=['company','date'],how='outer')
print df

    company       date  measure   end_date
0         0 2010-01-01       10        NaT
1         0 2010-01-15       10        NaT
2         0 2010-02-01       10 2010-02-01
3         0 2010-02-15       10        NaT
4         0 2010-03-01       10        NaT
5         0 2010-03-15       10 2010-03-15
6         0 2010-04-01       10        NaT
7         1 2010-03-01        5        NaT
8         1 2010-03-15        5        NaT
9         1 2010-04-01        5 2010-04-01
10        1 2010-04-15        5        NaT
11        1 2010-05-01        5        NaT
12        1 2010-05-15        5 2010-05-15

This merge essentially inserts your window end dates into the dataframe and then backfilling the end dates (by group) will give you a structure to easily create you summation windows:

df['end_date'] = df.groupby('company')['end_date'].apply(lambda x: x.bfill())

print df

    company       date  measure   end_date
0         0 2010-01-01       10 2010-02-01
1         0 2010-01-15       10 2010-02-01
2         0 2010-02-01       10 2010-02-01
3         0 2010-02-15       10 2010-03-15
4         0 2010-03-01       10 2010-03-15
5         0 2010-03-15       10 2010-03-15
6         0 2010-04-01       10        NaT
7         1 2010-03-01        5 2010-04-01
8         1 2010-03-15        5 2010-04-01
9         1 2010-04-01        5 2010-04-01
10        1 2010-04-15        5 2010-05-15
11        1 2010-05-01        5 2010-05-15
12        1 2010-05-15        5 2010-05-15

df = df[df.end_date.notnull()]
df['beg_date'] = (df['end_date'].values.astype('datetime64[D]') -
                   np.timedelta64(30,'D'))

print df

   company       date  measure   end_date   beg_date
0         0 2010-01-01       10 2010-02-01 2010-01-02
1         0 2010-01-15       10 2010-02-01 2010-01-02
2         0 2010-02-01       10 2010-02-01 2010-01-02
3         0 2010-02-15       10 2010-03-15 2010-02-13
4         0 2010-03-01       10 2010-03-15 2010-02-13
5         0 2010-03-15       10 2010-03-15 2010-02-13
7         1 2010-03-01        5 2010-04-01 2010-03-02
8         1 2010-03-15        5 2010-04-01 2010-03-02
9         1 2010-04-01        5 2010-04-01 2010-03-02
10        1 2010-04-15        5 2010-05-15 2010-04-15
11        1 2010-05-01        5 2010-05-15 2010-04-15
12        1 2010-05-15        5 2010-05-15 2010-04-15

df = df[(df.date >= df.beg_date) & (df.date <= df.end_date)]
print df.groupby(['company','end_date']).sum()

                    measure
company end_date           
0       2010-02-01       20
        2010-03-15       30
1       2010-04-01       10
        2010-05-15       15

Another alternative is to resample your first dataframe to daily data and then compute rolling_sums with a 30 day window; and select the dates at the end that you are interested in. This could be quite memory intensive too.

1
  • 1
    +1 for showing two strategies and their strengths/weaknesses. – ojdo May 7 '14 at 19:03
5

There is a very easy, and practical (or maybe the only direct way) to do conditional join in pandas. Since there is no direct way to do conditional join in pandas, you will need an additional library, and that is, pandasql

Install the library pandasql from pip using the command pip install pandasql. This library allows you to manipulate the pandas dataframes using the SQL queries.

import pandas as pd
from pandasql import sqldf

df = pd.read_excel(r'play_data.xlsx')
df

    id    Name  Amount
0   A001    A   100
1   A002    B   110
2   A003    C   120
3   A005    D   150

Now let's just do a conditional join to compare the Amount of the IDs

# Make your pysqldf object:
pysqldf = lambda q: sqldf(q, globals())

# Write your query in SQL syntax, here you can use df as a normal SQL table
cond_join= '''
    select 
        df_left.*,
        df_right.*
    from df as df_left
    join df as df_right
    on
        df_left.[Amount] > (df_right.[Amount]+10)

'''

# Now, get your queries results as dataframe using the sqldf object that you created
pysqldf(cond_join)

    id  Name    Amount  id    Name  Amount
0   A003    C   120    A001   A   100
1   A005    D   150    A001   A   100
2   A005    D   150    A002   B   110
3   A005    D   150    A003   C   120
1
  • 2
    This is exactly what I was looking for. Thanks for the answer!! PS - i was calling this within a function and utilized locals() instead of globals(). cond_join = """ select df_left.*, df_right.* from t_p as df_left join t_s as df_right on df_left.short_key = df_right.short_key """ combo = sqldf(cond_join, locals()) – theStud54 Feb 24 '20 at 10:29

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