9

Given the class template

template<class T>
struct A {
    A( const T & x );
};

I would like to instantiate objects of this class without writing out the actual type T, because this is typically a clumsy type resulting from some sort of expression templates and lambda functions. One way to accomplish this would be

template<class T>
A<T> create_A( const T& t ){ 
    return A<T>( t );
}

int main(){
    auto a = create_A( complicated_expression );
}

Here I never wrote the actual type of the expression, but this creates a copy of A and won't work without a copy constructor. I don't have a copy (or move) constructor. What I'm looking for is something like

A a( complicated_expression );

Clean and simple, and the compiler should be able to figure out the actual type. Unfortunately this isn't valid C++. So what would be the best valid C++ syntax to accomplish the same thing? Currently I'm doing this:

auto x = complicated_expression;
A<decltype(x)> a(x);

But this seems unnecessary verbose. Is there a better way to do this?

  • Is returning A<T>* from create_A not an option? – dlf May 7 '14 at 18:06
  • 2
    "I don't have a copy (or move) constructor" Can you provide it? If you are concerned about performance, you do not have to, as the compiler will most likely elide it anyway, it just needs to be defined so that it is accessible. This seems like most idiomatic way to do what you want. – Suma May 7 '14 at 18:09
  • @dlf Interesting idea, thanks. I have to think about the best way to do memory management then. – pentadecagon May 7 '14 at 18:10
  • @Suma Actually I didn't really think about this, but now as you mention it, yes, maybe this is the way to go. Thanks. – pentadecagon May 7 '14 at 18:19
  • 3
    Why are you assuming that the function create_A() would create a copy. I would expect most compilers to avoid the copy using RVO. At least when using optimizations. – TAS May 7 '14 at 18:46
2

Well, if your compiler is MSVC, this will work:

template<class T>
struct A {
    A(const T & x) {}

    A(const A&) = delete;
    A(A&&) = delete;
};


template <typename T>
A<T> create_A(const T& t)
{
    return t;
}

const auto& a = create_A(666);
const auto& b = create_A(a);
const auto& c = create_A(b);

No such luck with clang and g++, though.

Assigning a result returned by value to a const reference is perfectly legal, by the way, and has its uses. Why MSCV avoids checking for type being moveable/copyable (even though it would optimise it away) is a mystery to me and likely a bug. But, it'd kinda work in your case if you need to do it this way.

EDIT: alternatively, if you are not afraid to bring the wrath of C++ gods upon yourself, you can transform create_A into a macro:

#define create_A(x) (A<decltype(x)>(x))

Now it shall work on all compilers.

EDIT2: as @dyp suggested, this answer can be improved further:

template <typename T>
A<T> create_A(const T& t)
{
    return { t };
}

auto&& a = create_A(666);
auto&& b = create_A(a);
auto&& c = create_A(b);

It will work on all C++11 compilers.

  • As @JanHudec makes me note I think MSVC generate the copy constrcutor automatically. – Raydel Miranda May 7 '14 at 20:32
  • 3
    You can use auto&& a = create_A(666); and template<typename T> A<T> create_A(const T& t) { return {t}; } This will not call any copy/move constructors of A<T>. – dyp May 7 '14 at 20:50
  • 1
    Oh, btw, if you have MSVC2013, you should use = delete; instead of making those member functions private. My version should work on all compilers, since the list-initialization avoids constructing a temporary. – dyp May 7 '14 at 20:56
  • 1
    @dyp Thanks, that's brilliant. Is there any difference between return t; and return {t}; in this context? – pentadecagon May 8 '14 at 9:40
  • 1
    @pentadecagon Yes! E.g. see stackoverflow.com/q/7935639/420683 return {t} directly constructs the return value from t, whereas return t constructs a temporary of type A<T> and moves that into the return value (which requires a move or copy constructor). That copy/move can of course be elided, but an accessible copy/move constructor is always requires even if it is elided. – dyp May 8 '14 at 10:30
3

The code

template<class T>
A<T> create_A( const T& t ){ 
    return A<T>( t );
}

int main(){
    auto a = create_A( complicated_expression );
}

formally requires copy or move constructor to be defined and available, but any reasonable compiler will be able to optimize it away using copy elision rule. It is the standard idiom used widely across the standard library (e.g. std::make_pair).

0

The technique you're trying to implement is called template argument deduction.

So, I don't think you can achive something like:

A a( complicated_expression );

Since here A is the template's name and the template argument deduction takes place only in functions. Not in classes. With the line above you will not be able to avoid the missing template arguments error.

  • Ok, code removed, @JanHudec you are right. But still achive that the OP wants it's not possible without involve a function. – Raydel Miranda May 7 '14 at 20:30

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.