73

I am attempting to create a Windows Batch File that creates a .txt with mulitple lines. I've tried several solutions to insert a line break in the string but no avail. There are other similar questions/answers but none of them address putting the entire string into a text file.

My batch file currently reads:

echo Here is my first line
Here is my second line > myNewTextFile.txt
pause

my goal is to have the text file read:

Here is my first line
Here is my second line

Obviously, this does not work currently, but wondering if anyone knows how to make this happen in a simple fashion?

4 Answers 4

130
(
echo Here is my first line
echo Here is my second line
echo Here is my third line
)>"myNewTextFile.txt"
pause
11
  • This did the job excellently, tho for future reference the "quotation" marks around the file name ended up not being necessary.
    – Linuxmint
    May 8, 2014 at 19:04
  • 17
    The quotes aren't necessary but are good practice, for when & or space characters are in the filename or full path. You will also find that closing brackets need to be escaped as in ^) when using this solution.
    – foxidrive
    May 10, 2014 at 7:25
  • 3
    Unfortunately this does not work, when brackets '(' are in the text to be echoed. The solution with > and >> still works.
    – michael_s
    Jan 1, 2018 at 14:59
  • 1
    For the sake of clarity in conversation and eliminating the need to type "(", "[", "{"... The proper terms for these characters are: Parentheses: () Brackets, or Square Brackets:[] Braces, or Curly Braces: {}
    – Bob
    Jan 24, 2019 at 13:08
  • 3
    @Bob Brackets is a general term for all of those marks (including parentheses, which can certainly be called "round brackets"). Using "brackets" without qualification to mean square brackets [] specifically is only common in the US (and not even universal there), while in the British English it would mean round brackets (). This makes more sense any IMO since outside of computing the most commonly used brackets are round by an enormous margin. In any case, it certainly makes sense to just type out the type (square, round, curly) and type them out explicitly rather than risk confusion. Mar 8, 2019 at 10:38
39

Just repeat the echo and >> for lines after the first. >> means that it should append to a file instead of creating a new file (or overwriting an existing file):

echo Here is my first line > myNewTextFile.txt
echo Here is my second line >> myNewTextFile.txt
echo Here is my third line >> myNewTextFile.txt
pause
4
  • 1
    Is the pause command at the end required or is it just added because the OP has it in his script? Feb 16, 2021 at 17:11
  • 1
    @AdityaVikasDevarapalli: It's just there because it was in the poster's code. It is not required or necessary.
    – Ken White
    Feb 16, 2021 at 19:51
  • 2
    The accepted answer didn't work for me while this one did. Aug 9, 2021 at 19:35
  • Note that this will write spaces at the end of lines, because there is a space between the last word and >. Not normally a problem, but a hard one with some machine-readable files. Remove the spaces from the source code to fix.
    – Krishty
    Jan 20, 2022 at 22:52
11

Searching for something else, I stumbled on this meanwhile old question, and I have an additional little trick that is worth mentioning, I think.

All solutions have a problem with empty lines and when a line starts with an option for the echo command itself. Compare the output files in these examples:

call :data1 >file1.txt
call :data2 >file2.txt
exit /b

:data1
echo Next line is empty
echo
echo /? this line starts with /?
echo Last line
exit /b

:data2
echo:Next line is empty
echo:
echo:/? this line starts with /?
echo:Last line
exit /b

Now, file1.txt contains:

Next line is empty 
ECHO is off. 
Displays messages, or turns command-echoing on or off.

  ECHO [ON | OFF]
  ECHO [message]

Type ECHO without parameters to display the current echo setting. 
Last line

While file2.txt contains:

Next line is empty

/? this line starts with /?
Last line

The use of echo: miraculously solves the issues with the output in file1.txt.

Besides the colon, there are other characters that you could 'paste' to echo, among them a dot, a slash, ... Try for yourself.

1
  • Nice to know that colon works as well, I thought the documented version was dot as in echo. and echo./? whatever
    – NiKiZe
    Oct 6, 2020 at 10:40
2

STEP 1: Enter Line 1 followed by the ^ character.

echo Here is my first line^ 

STEP 2: Hit RETURN key to get a prompt for more text

echo Here is my first line^ 
More?

STEP 3: Hit RETURN key once more to get a second prompt for more text

echo Here is my first line^ 
More?
More?

STEP 4: Continue line 2 from the second prompt

echo Here is my first line^ 
More?
More? Here is my second line

STEP 5: Hit the RETURN key to get 2 statements displayed on two separate lines

Results:

echo Here is my first line^ 
More?
More? Here is my second line
Here is my first line  
Here is my second line

NOTE
However, if you wish to save this to file, you could add a final STEP.
STEP 6: with the help of the > character, you can append the filename so you save your output to file instead.

echo Here is my first line^ 
More?
More? Here is my second line >"myNewTextFile.txt"

Example from CMD

1
  • 1
    this solution only works in command prompt, not in a batch files.
    – Ygautomo
    Feb 16 at 4:45

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