3

I am new to multithreaded programming and so I thought I would work on a project to help me learn it. Here are the details of the project:

Write a multithreaded sorting program in c that works as follows: A list of integers is divided into two smaller lists of equal size. Two separate threads (which we will term sorting threads) sort each sublist using a sorting algorithm of your choice. The two sublists are then merged by a third thread - a merging thread - which merges the two sublists into a single sorted list.

//Sort a list of numbers using two separate threads
//by sorting half of each list separately then
//recombining the lists

#include <pthread.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

#define SIZE 10
#define NUMBER_OF_THREADS 3

void *sorter(void *params);    /* thread that performs basic sorting algorithm */
void *merger(void *params);    /* thread that performs merging of results */

int list[SIZE] = {7,12,19,3,18,4,2,6,15,8};

int result[SIZE];

typedef struct
{
    int from_index;
    int to_index;
} parameters;

int main (int argc, const char * argv[])
{
    int i;

    pthread_t workers[NUMBER_OF_THREADS];

    /* establish the first sorting thread */
    parameters *data = (parameters *) malloc (sizeof(parameters));
    data->from_index = 0;
    data->to_index = (SIZE/2) - 1;
    pthread_create(&workers[0], 0, sorter, data);

    /* establish the second sorting thread */
    data = (parameters *) malloc (sizeof(parameters));
    data->from_index = (SIZE/2);
    data->to_index = SIZE - 1;
    pthread_create(&workers[1], 0, sorter, data);

    /* now wait for the 2 sorting threads to finish */
    for (i = 0; i < NUMBER_OF_THREADS - 1; i++)
        pthread_join(workers[i], NULL);

    /* establish the merge thread */
    data = (parameters *) malloc(sizeof(parameters));
    data->from_index = 0;
    data->to_index = (SIZE/2);
    pthread_create(&workers[2], 0, merger, data);

    /* wait for the merge thread to finish */
    pthread_join(workers[2], NULL);


    /* output the sorted array */

    return 0;
}

void *sorter(void *params)
{
    parameters* p = (parameters *)params;

    //SORT

    int begin = p->from_index;
    int end = p->to_index+1;

    int z;
    for(z = begin; z < end; z++){
        printf("The array recieved is: %d\n", list[z]);
    }

    printf("\n");

    int i,j,t,k;

    for(i=begin; i< end; i++)
    {
        for(j=begin; j< end-i-1; j++)
        {

            if(list[j] > list[j+1])
            {
                t = list[j];
                list[j] = list[j+1];
                list[j+1] = t;

            }
        }
    }

    for(k = begin; k< end; k++){
            printf("The sorted array: %d\n", list[k]);
    }

    int x;
    for(x=begin; x<end; x++)
    {
            list[x] = result[x];
    }

    printf("\n");

    pthread_exit(0);
}

void *merger(void *params)
{
    parameters* p = (parameters *)params;

   //MERGE
    int begin = p->from_index;
    int end = p->to_index+1;

    int i,j,t;

    printf("list[1]: %d",list[1]);
    printf("result[1]: %d",result[1]);

    for(i=begin; i< end; i++)
    {
        for(j=begin; j< end-i; j++)
        {

            if(result[j] > result[j+1])
            {
                t = result[j];
                result[j] = result[j+1];
                result[j+1] = t;

            }
        }
    }

    int d;
    for(d=0; d<SIZE; d++)
    {
        printf("The final resulting array is: %d\n", result[d]);
    }

    pthread_exit(0);
}

I'm not sure what I'm doing wrong in my algorithms that its not working. It doesn't seem to catch the new sorted array. Any help on this problem would be appreciated VERY much! Thanks again in advance for all your help!

1
  • Did you try running your routines in serial? As in - calling sorter(data) twice and then merge, rather than going through threads, and stepping through it?
    – kfsone
    Jul 2 '15 at 20:02
16

Your approach is incorrect. You should be splitting your partitions, then recursing or threading into them, joining the results, then merging. Its easy to screw this algorithm up, believe me.

Before anything else, make sure your merge algorithm is solid. If your merge has issues in a single-threaded arena, adding threads is only going to make it worse. In your case, you're making it worse because your merge thread appears to be running concurrently with your sorter threads.

That said, step back and consider this. Mergesort is about divide and conquer. To thread up a merge sort you should be doing the following:

  • Establish a maximum number of threads. Believe me, the last thing you want happening is spinning a thread for each partition. a sequence of 1024 values has 1023 partitions if you crunch the math hard enough. that many threads is not a solution. Establish some boundaries.

  • Establish a minimum partition size that you're willing to spin a thread for. This is as important as the first item above. Just like you don't want to be spinning 1023 threads to sort a 1024-slot sequence, you also don't want to be spinning a thread just to sort a sequence that has two items. There is zero benefit and much cost.

  • Have a solid merge algorithm. There are many efficient ways to do it, but do something simple and enhance it later. Right now we're just interested in getting the general threading down right. There is always time to enhance this with a fancy merge algorithm (like in-place, which believe me is harder than it sounds).

Having the above the idea is this:

  • The merge sort algorithm will have three parameters: a starting pointer, a length, and a thread-depth. For our purposes the thread depth will be N in a situation where we are using at-most 2N-1 threads. (more on that later, but trust me, it makes it easier to do the math this way).

  • If the thread depth has reached zero OR the sequence length is below a minimum threshold *we set), do not setup and run a new thread. Just recurse into our function again.

  • Otherwise, split the partition. Setup a structure that holds a partition definition (which for us will be a starting point and a length as well as the thread depth which will be N/2), launch a thread with that parameter block, then do NOT launch another thread. instead use the current thread to recurse into merge_sort_mt() for the "other" half.

  • Once the current thread returns from its recursion is must wait on the other thread via a join. once that is done both partitions will be done and they can be merged using your trivial merge algorithm.

Whew. Ok. so how does it look in practice:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <time.h>
#include <pthread.h>


struct Params
{
    int *start;
    size_t len;
    int depth;
};

// only used for synchronizing stdout from overlap.
pthread_mutex_t mtx = PTHREAD_MUTEX_INITIALIZER;

// forward declare our thread proc
void *merge_sort_thread(void *pv);


// a simple merge algorithm. there are *several* more efficient ways
//  of doing this, but the purpose of this exercise is to establish
//  merge-threading, so we stick with simple for now.
void merge(int *start, int *mid, int *end)
{
    int *res = malloc((end - start)*sizeof(*res));
    int *lhs = start, *rhs = mid, *dst = res;

    while (lhs != mid && rhs != end)
        *dst++ = (*lhs < *rhs) ? *lhs++ : *rhs++;

    while (lhs != mid)
        *dst++ = *lhs++;

    // copy results
    memcpy(start, res, (rhs - start) * sizeof *res);
    free(res);
}

// our multi-threaded entry point.
void merge_sort_mt(int *start, size_t len, int depth)
{
    if (len < 2)
        return;

    if (depth <= 0 || len < 4)
    {
        merge_sort_mt(start, len/2, 0);
        merge_sort_mt(start+len/2, len-len/2, 0);
    }
    else
    {
        struct Params params = { start, len/2, depth/2 };
        pthread_t thrd;

        pthread_mutex_lock(&mtx);
        printf("Starting subthread...\n");
        pthread_mutex_unlock(&mtx);

        // create our thread
        pthread_create(&thrd, NULL, merge_sort_thread, &params);

        // recurse into our top-end parition
        merge_sort_mt(start+len/2, len-len/2, depth/2);

        // join on the launched thread
        pthread_join(thrd, NULL);

        pthread_mutex_lock(&mtx);
        printf("Finished subthread.\n");
        pthread_mutex_unlock(&mtx);
    }

    // merge the partitions.
    merge(start, start+len/2, start+len);
}

// our thread-proc that invokes merge_sort. this just passes the
//  given parameters off to our merge_sort algorithm
void *merge_sort_thread(void *pv)
{
    struct Params *params = pv;
    merge_sort_mt(params->start, params->len, params->depth);
    return pv;
}

// public-facing api
void merge_sort(int *start, size_t len)
{
    merge_sort_mt(start, len, 4); // 4 is a nice number, will use 7 threads.
}

int main()
{
    static const unsigned int N = 2048;
    int *data = malloc(N * sizeof(*data));
    unsigned int i;

    srand((unsigned)time(0));
    for (i=0; i<N; ++i)
    {
        data[i] = rand() % 1024;
        printf("%4d ", data[i]);
        if ((i+1)%8 == 0)
            printf("\n");
    }
    printf("\n");

    // invoke our multi-threaded merge-sort
    merge_sort(data, N);
    for (i=0; i<N; ++i)
    {
        printf("%4d ", data[i]);
        if ((i+1)%8 == 0)
            printf("\n");
    }
    printf("\n");

    free(data);

    return 0;

}

The output for this looks something like this:

 825  405  691  290  900  715  125  969 
 534  809  783  820  933  895  310  687 
 152   19  659  856   46  765  497  371 
 339  660  297  509  152  796  230  465 
 502  948  278  317  144  941  195  208 
 617  428  118  505  719  161   53  292 
 ....
 994  154  745  666  590  356  894  741 
 881  129  439  237   83  181   33  310 
 549  484   12  524  753  820  443  275 
  17  731  825  709  725  663  647  257 

Starting subthread...
Starting subthread...
Starting subthread...
Starting subthread...
Starting subthread...
Starting subthread...
Starting subthread...
Finished subthread.
Finished subthread.
Finished subthread.
Finished subthread.
Finished subthread.
Finished subthread.
Finished subthread.
   0    0    1    1    1    2    3    3 
   5    5    5    5    6    6    7    7 
   7    7    7    8    8   10   10   11 
  11   11   12   12   12   13   14   14 
  15   15   15   15   16   17   17   17 
  17   18   18   19   19   19   20   21 
  21   21   22   22   23   24   24   24 
  25   25   25   26   26   28   28   29 
  29   29   30   30   30   30   30   31 
....
 994  995  996  998 1000 1001 1001 1003 
1003 1003 1003 1004 1004 1005 1007 1007 
1010 1010 1010 1010 1011 1012 1012 1012 
1012 1013 1013 1013 1015 1015 1016 1016 
1016 1017 1018 1019 1019 1019 1020 1020 
1020 1021 1021 1021 1021 1022 1023 1023 

The most important part of this is the limiters that keep us from going thread-wild (which is easy to accidentally do with recursive threaded algorithms), and the join of the threads before merging their content with the other half of the partition (which we sorted on our thread, and may also have done the same thing).

It's a fun exercise, and I hope you got something out of it. Best of luck.


Update: Integrating qsort()

An interesting task would be performing this functionality using qsort() for sorting the smaller partitions or once the thread pool reaches exhaustion. qsort() is a pretty big hammer to bring to this party, and as such you're going to want to raise the minimum partition size to something respectful (in the example below, we use 256 elements).

So what would it take to integrate qsort() the the sub partitions rather than a hand-rolled merge-sort? Surprisingly, not much. Start with a qsort() compatible comparator:

// comparator for qsort
int cmp_proc(const void *arg1, const void* arg2)
{
    const int *lhs = arg1;
    const int *rhs = arg2;
    return (*lhs < *rhs) ? -1 : (*rhs < *lhs ? 1 : 0);
}

Pretty brain-dead. Now, modify the mt-wrapper to look something like this:

// our multi-threaded entry point.
void merge_sort_mt(int *start, size_t len, int depth)
{
    if (len < 2)
        return;

    // invoke qsort on the partition. no need for merge
    if (depth <= 0 || len <= 256)
    {
        qsort(start, len, sizeof(*start), cmp_proc);
        return;
    }

    struct Params params = { start, len/2, depth/2 };
    pthread_t thrd;

    pthread_mutex_lock(&mtx);
    printf("Starting subthread...\n");
    pthread_mutex_unlock(&mtx);

    // create our thread
    pthread_create(&thrd, NULL, merge_sort_thread, &params);

    // recurse into our top-end parition
    merge_sort_mt(start+len/2, len-len/2, depth/2);

    // join on the launched thread
    pthread_join(thrd, NULL);

    pthread_mutex_lock(&mtx);
    printf("Finished subthread.\n");
    pthread_mutex_unlock(&mtx);

    // merge the paritions.
    merge(start, start+len/2, start+len);
}

That's it. Seriously. That is all it takes. Proving this works is a simple test run with the original program, shown below:

 986  774   60  596  832  171  659  753 
 638  680  973  352  340  221  836  390 
 930   38  564  277  544  785  795  451 
  94  602  724  154  752  381  433  990 
 539  587  194  963  558  797  800  355 
 420  376  501  429  203  470  670  683 
....
 216  748  534  482  217  178  541  242 
 118  421  457  810   14  544  100  388 
 291   29  562  718  534  243  322  187 
 502  203  912  717 1018  749  742  430 
 172  831  341  331  914  866  931  368 

Starting subthread...
Starting subthread...
Starting subthread...
Starting subthread...
Starting subthread...
Starting subthread...
Starting subthread...
Finished subthread.
Finished subthread.
Finished subthread.
Finished subthread.
Finished subthread.
Finished subthread.
Finished subthread.
   0    0    1    1    1    1    3    3 
   3    4    5    5    6    6    6    6 
   7    7    8    9   10   10   10   10 
  11   12   12   12   13   13   14   14 
  14   15   15   15   16   17   17   19 
  19   20   20   21   21   21   22   22 
  23   23   23   24   24   24   25   26 
  26   26   26   27   28   28   28   28 
....
1000 1000 1000 1001 1001 1002 1003 1003 
1004 1004 1004 1005 1005 1005 1006 1007 
1008 1010 1010 1010 1010 1010 1011 1011 
1011 1012 1012 1012 1012 1013 1013 1013 
1015 1015 1015 1016 1016 1017 1017 1017 
1018 1018 1018 1019 1019 1021 1021 1022 

As you can see, the results are similar.

2
  • 1
    I have a minor nitpick. Your merge() isn't stable. It's a useful feature of merge sort and easy to correct in your code. May 8 '14 at 3:57
  • @Blastfurnace yeah, I know. I was going for as brain dead simple as I could get. I honestly never even thought about it.
    – WhozCraig
    May 8 '14 at 4:15
0

A couple of issues:

1 - What do you think this code is doing:

int x;
for(x=begin; x<end; x++)
{
        list[x] = result[x];
}

2 - Your merger currently looks exactly like your sorter. It should instead be merging the sorted values from the first half of the list and the second half of the list into the result.

0

Your code is correct i have modified your code and tried to figure out the error, the loop indexes are not correctly mapped and you are assigning the null result list into actual data in one loop, so the list is taking zeroes.

Find below the modified code and output.

//Sort a list of numbers using two separate threads
//by sorting half of each list separately then
//recombining the lists



void *sort(void *params)
{
    parameters* p = (parameters *)params;

    //SORT

    int begin = p->fromVal;
    int end = p->toVal+1;

    for(int i = begin; i < end; i++){
        printf("The array recieved is: %d\n", list[i]);
    }

    printf("\n");

    int temp=0;

    for(int i=begin; i< end; i++)
    {
        for(int j=begin; j< end-1; j++)
        {

            if(list[j] > list[j+1])
            {
                temp = list[j];
                list[j] = list[j+1];
                list[j+1] = temp;

            }
        }
    }

    for(int k = begin; k< end; k++){
            printf("The sorted array: %d\n", list[k]);
    }

    for(int i=begin; i<end; i++)
    {
            result[i] = list[i];
    }
    printf("\n");

    pthread_exit(NULL);
}

void *merging(void *params)
{
    parameters* p = (parameters *)params;

   //MERGE
    int begin = p->fromVal;
    int end = p->toVal+1;

    int temp;
    for(int i=begin; i< end; i++)
    {
        for(int j=begin; j< end-1; j++)
        {

            if(result[j] > result[j+1])
            {
                temp= result[j];
                result[j] = result[j+1];
                result[j+1] = temp;

            }
        }
    }
    printf("\n\nFINAL RESULT IS:\n");
    for(int d=begin+1; d<end; d++)
    {
        printf("The final resulting array is: %d\n", result[d]);
    }

    pthread_exit(NULL);
}
0
#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <pthread.h>
#include <time.h>


/*globle variables*/
/* structure for passing data to threads */

typedef struct
{
    int *start;
    int end;
    int size;
} parameters;


int t = 1;
int *arr1, *arr2;
//for using quicksort
int comparator (const void * a, const void * b) {
   return ( *(int*)a - *(int*)b );
}

void *merge(void *params){
     //get data
   int *len = params;
    //SORT
    int start  = 0;
    int end = *len/2;
    int counter = end;
    int size =  *len;
    int index = 0;
    while (start < end && counter < size)
       {

          if (arr1[start] < arr1[counter])
          {

              arr2[index] = arr1[start];

            start ++;

          }
          else
          {


            arr2[index] = arr1[counter];

            counter ++;
         }
        index ++;
       }

       /* Copy the remaining elements , if there
       are any */

       while ( start < end)
       {

           arr2[index] = arr1[start];

          start ++;
          index ++;
       }

      /* Copy the remaining elements  , if there
       are any */
        while ( counter < size)
       {
          arr2[index] = arr1[counter];
          counter ++;
          index ++;
       }



}
void *sorting_thread(void *params){
    printf("Thread %d ......\n", t);
    t++;

    //get data
   parameters* data = (parameters *)params;
   //SORT

    int end = data->end;
    int size = data->size;


    //qsort
    qsort(data->start, end, sizeof(*data->start), comparator);
    printf("The array after sort : \n");
          for(int i = size - end; i < size; i ++){
               printf("arr1[%d]:%d, \n", i,arr1[i]);
         }
    printf("\n");
    pthread_exit(0);

}


void *merge_sort_thread(void *params){
    int *len = params;
    //varaible allocation for two sorting threads.
    parameters *data = (parameters *) malloc (sizeof(parameters));
    parameters *data1 = (parameters *) malloc (sizeof(parameters));
    if(data == NULL&& data1 == NULL){
      printf("Memory not allocated. \n");
      exit(0);
     }
     //value for data passing

         data->start= arr1;
         data->end = *len/2;
         data->size = *len/2;
         data1->start = arr1 + *len/2;
         data1->end = *len-*len/2;
         data1->size = *len;

    pthread_t left, right;/* the thread identifier */
     printf("Entering merge_Sorting..\n");

         /* create the sorting thread */

             pthread_create(&left, NULL, sorting_thread, data);

             pthread_create(&right, NULL, sorting_thread, data1);

          /* wait for the thread to exit */
             pthread_join(left, NULL);
             //free memory
             free(data);

             pthread_join(right, NULL);
        printf("Merging Thread %d ......\n", t);
         merge(len);
         printf("Process is done.\n");
         printf("The final output: \n");
         for(int i = 0; i < *len; i ++){
             if(i%10==0){
                 printf("\n");
             }
             printf("%d, ", arr2[i]);
         }
         printf("\n");
         //free memory
         free(data1);

         pthread_exit(0);

}



int main( int argc, char *argv[] )  {
    long len;
    int temp, c, j, k;
    char *ptr;

    //

   //check if the right amount of argument
   if( argc == 2 ) {
      printf("The input array size is %s\n", argv[1]);


        //covert the user input to integer

      len = strtol(argv[1], &ptr, 10);

   //check if the input is valid.
       if(len == 0) {//if not, leave the program.
            printf("Please enter a proper number. Leaving the program...\n");
       }else{

     //dynamically allocate memory
     arr1 = (int*)malloc(len * sizeof(int));
     arr2 = (int*)malloc(len * sizeof(int));
     //check Memory
     if(arr1 == NULL && arr2 == NULL){
      printf("Memory not allocated. \n");
      exit(0);
     }

         printf("Memory allocated. \n");
         //decide the value of data.


         //generate random number to 100
         srand(time(0));

         printf("The array before sorting is:  \n");

         for(int i = 0; i < len; i ++){
             arr1[i] = rand() % 100;
             if(i%10==0){
                 printf("\n");
             }
             printf("%d, ", arr1[i]);
         }
         printf(" \n");
         //merge sort handle all the threads
         pthread_t tid;/* the thread identifier */

         /* create the parent sorting thread */
         pthread_create(&tid, NULL, merge_sort_thread, &len);
         //wait for children thread
         pthread_join(tid, NULL);
          //printout array after merging threading
         printf("\nThe program is finished. \n");
         //free memory space
         free(arr2);
         free(arr1);
      }

   }
   else if( argc > 2 ) {
      printf("Too many arguments supplied.\n");
   }
   else {
      printf("One argument expected.\n");
   }

return 0;

}

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