134

As I can understand documentation the following definitions are equivalent:

create table foo (
    id serial primary key,
    code integer,
    label text,
    constraint foo_uq unique (code, label));

create table foo (
    id serial primary key,
    code integer,
    label text);
create unique index foo_idx on foo using btree (code, label);    

However you can read in the note: The preferred way to add a unique constraint to a table is ALTER TABLE ... ADD CONSTRAINT. The use of indexes to enforce unique constraints could be considered an implementation detail that should not be accessed directly.

Is it only a matter of good style? What are practical consequences of choice one of these variants (e.g. in performance)?

  • 21
    The (only) practical difference is that you can create a foreign key to a unique constraint but not to a unique index. – a_horse_with_no_name May 8 '14 at 13:13
  • 26
    An advantage the other way around (as came up in another question recently) is that you can have a partial unique index, such as "Unique ( foo ) Where bar Is Null". AFAIK, there's no way to do that with a constraint. – IMSoP May 8 '14 at 13:21
  • 2
    @a_horse_with_no_name I'm not sure when this happened, but this no longer appears to be true. This SQL fiddle allows foreign key references to a unique index: sqlfiddle.com/#!17/20ee9; EDIT: adding a 'filter' to the unique index causes this to stop working (as expected) – user1935361 Jan 26 '18 at 16:01
  • from postgres documentation: PostgreSQL automatically creates a unique index when a unique constraint or primary key is defined for a table. postgresql.org/docs/9.4/static/indexes-unique.html – maggu May 26 '18 at 2:36
  • I concur with @user1935361, if it were not possible to create a foreign key to a unique index (with PG 10 at least) I would have run into this issue a long time ago. – Andy Jun 26 '18 at 14:21
118

I had some doubts about this basic but important issue, so I decided to learn by example.

Let's create test table master with two columns, con_id with unique constraint and ind_id indexed by unique index.

create table master (
    con_id integer unique,
    ind_id integer
);
create unique index master_unique_idx on master (ind_id);

    Table "public.master"
 Column |  Type   | Modifiers
--------+---------+-----------
 con_id | integer |
 ind_id | integer |
Indexes:
    "master_con_id_key" UNIQUE CONSTRAINT, btree (con_id)
    "master_unique_idx" UNIQUE, btree (ind_id)

In table description (\d in psql) you can tell unique constraint from unique index.

Uniqueness

Let's check uniqueness, just in case.

test=# insert into master values (0, 0);
INSERT 0 1
test=# insert into master values (0, 1);
ERROR:  duplicate key value violates unique constraint "master_con_id_key"
DETAIL:  Key (con_id)=(0) already exists.
test=# insert into master values (1, 0);
ERROR:  duplicate key value violates unique constraint "master_unique_idx"
DETAIL:  Key (ind_id)=(0) already exists.
test=#

It works as expected!

Foreign keys

Now we'll define detail table with two foreign keys referencing to our two columns in master.

create table detail (
    con_id integer,
    ind_id integer,
    constraint detail_fk1 foreign key (con_id) references master(con_id),
    constraint detail_fk2 foreign key (ind_id) references master(ind_id)
);

    Table "public.detail"
 Column |  Type   | Modifiers
--------+---------+-----------
 con_id | integer |
 ind_id | integer |
Foreign-key constraints:
    "detail_fk1" FOREIGN KEY (con_id) REFERENCES master(con_id)
    "detail_fk2" FOREIGN KEY (ind_id) REFERENCES master(ind_id)

Well, no errors. Let's make sure it works.

test=# insert into detail values (0, 0);
INSERT 0 1
test=# insert into detail values (1, 0);
ERROR:  insert or update on table "detail" violates foreign key constraint "detail_fk1"
DETAIL:  Key (con_id)=(1) is not present in table "master".
test=# insert into detail values (0, 1);
ERROR:  insert or update on table "detail" violates foreign key constraint "detail_fk2"
DETAIL:  Key (ind_id)=(1) is not present in table "master".
test=#

Both columns can be referenced in foreign keys.

Constraint using index

You can add table constraint using existing unique index.

alter table master add constraint master_ind_id_key unique using index master_unique_idx;

    Table "public.master"
 Column |  Type   | Modifiers
--------+---------+-----------
 con_id | integer |
 ind_id | integer |
Indexes:
    "master_con_id_key" UNIQUE CONSTRAINT, btree (con_id)
    "master_ind_id_key" UNIQUE CONSTRAINT, btree (ind_id)
Referenced by:
    TABLE "detail" CONSTRAINT "detail_fk1" FOREIGN KEY (con_id) REFERENCES master(con_id)
    TABLE "detail" CONSTRAINT "detail_fk2" FOREIGN KEY (ind_id) REFERENCES master(ind_id)

Now there is no difference between column constraints description.

Partial indexes

In table constraint declaration you cannot create partial indexes. It comes directly from the definition of create table .... In unique index declaration you can set WHERE clause to create partial index. You can also create index on expression (not only on column) and define some other parameters (collation, sort order, NULLs placement).

You cannot add table constraint using partial index.

alter table master add column part_id integer;
create unique index master_partial_idx on master (part_id) where part_id is not null;

alter table master add constraint master_part_id_key unique using index master_partial_idx;
ERROR:  "master_partial_idx" is a partial index
LINE 1: alter table master add constraint master_part_id_key unique ...
                               ^
DETAIL:  Cannot create a primary key or unique constraint using such an index.
  • is it actual info? especially about partial indexes – anatol Feb 20 at 6:30
  • @anatol - yes, it is. – klin Feb 20 at 9:02
27

One more advantage of using UNIQUE INDEX vs. UNIQUE CONSTRAINT is that you can easily DROP/CREATE an index CONCURRENTLY, whereas with a constraint you can't.

  • 3
    AFAIK it's not possible to drop concurrently a unique index. postgresql.org/docs/9.3/static/sql-dropindex.html "There are several caveats to be aware of when using this option. Only one index name can be specified, and the CASCADE option is not supported. (Thus, an index that supports a UNIQUE or PRIMARY KEY constraint cannot be dropped this way.)" – Rafał Cieślak Oct 8 '16 at 17:35
10

Uniqueness is a constraint. It happens to be implemented via the creation of a unique index since an index is quickly able to search all existing values in order to determine if a given value already exists.

Conceptually the index is an implementation detail and uniqueness should be associated only with constraints.

The full text

So speed performance should be same

3

Another thing I've encountered is that you can use sql expressions in unique indexes but not in constraints.

So, this does not work:

CREATE TABLE users (
    name text,
    UNIQUE (lower(name))
);

but following works.

CREATE TABLE users (
    name text
);
CREATE UNIQUE INDEX uq_name on users (lower(name));
  • I would use the citext extension. – ceving Mar 11 at 15:57
0

I read this in the doc:

ADD table_constraint [ NOT VALID ]

This form adds a new constraint to a table using the same syntax as CREATE TABLE, plus the option NOT VALID, which is currently only allowed for foreign key constraints. If the constraint is marked NOT VALID, the potentially-lengthy initial check to verify that all rows in the table satisfy the constraint is skipped. The constraint will still be enforced against subsequent inserts or updates (that is, they'll fail unless there is a matching row in the referenced table). But the database will not assume that the constraint holds for all rows in the table, until it is validated by using the VALIDATE CONSTRAINT option.

So I think it is what you call "partial uniqueness" by adding a constraint.

And, about how to ensure the uniqueness:

Adding a unique constraint will automatically create a unique B-tree index on the column or group of columns listed in the constraint. A uniqueness restriction covering only some rows cannot be written as a unique constraint, but it is possible to enforce such a restriction by creating a unique partial index.

Note: The preferred way to add a unique constraint to a table is ALTER TABLE … ADD CONSTRAINT. The use of indexes to enforce unique constraints could be considered an implementation detail that should not be accessed directly. One should, however, be aware that there’s no need to manually create indexes on unique columns; doing so would just duplicate the automatically-created index.

So we should add constraint, which creates an index, to ensure uniqueness.

How I see this problem?

A "constraint" aims to gramatically ensure that this column should be unique, it establishes a law, a rule; while "index" is semantical, about "how to implement, how to achieve the uniqueness, what does unique means when it comes to implementation". So, the way Postgresql implements it, is very logical: first, you declare that a column should be unique, then, Postgresql adds the implementation of adding an unique index for you.

0

There is a difference in locking.
Adding an index does not block read access to the table.
Adding a constraint does put a table lock (so all selects are blocked) since it is added via ALTER TABLE.

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