5

I've read over several examples of code using JavaScript generators such as this one. The simplest generator-using block I can come up with is something like:

function read(path) {
    return function (done) {
        fs.readFile(path, "file", done);
    }
}

co(function *() {
    console.log( yield read("file") );
})();

This does indeed print out the contents of file, but my hangup is where done is called. Seemingly, yield is syntactic sugar for wrapping what it returns to in a callback and assigning the result value appropriately (and at least in the case of co, throwing the error argument to the callback). Is my understanding of the syntax correct?

What does done look like when yield is used?

  • Are you referring to done as used inside read(path)? I don't think it has anything to do with yield or generators specifically - it's part of the co library. – voithos May 8 '14 at 21:01
3

Seemingly, yield is syntactic sugar for wrapping what it returns to in a callback and assigning the result value appropriately (and at least in the case of co, throwing the error argument to the callback)

No, yield is no syntactic sugar. It's the core syntax element of generators. When that generator is instantiated, you can run it (by calling .next() on it), and that will return the value that was returned or yielded. When the generator was yielded, you can continue it later by calling .next() again. The arguments to next will be the value that the yield expresion returns inside the generator.

Only in case of co, those async callback things (and other things) are handled "appropriately" for what you would consider natural in an async control flow library.

What does done look like when yield is used?

The thread function example from the article that you read gives you a good impression of this:

function thread(fn) {
  var gen = fn();
  function next(err, res) {
    var ret = gen.next(res);
    if (ret.done) return;
    ret.value(next);
  }
  next();
}

In your code, yield does yield the value of the expression read("file") from the generator when it is ran. This becomes the ret.val, the result of gen.next(). To this, the next function is passed - a callback that will continue the generator with the result that was passed to it. In your generator code, it looks as if the yield expression returned this value.

An "unrolled" version of what happens could be written like this:

function fn*() {
    console.log( yield function (done) {
        fs.readFile("filepath", "file", done);
    } );
}
var gen = fn();
var ret1 = gen.next();
var callasync = ret1.value;
callasync(function next(err, res) {
    var ret2 = gen.next(res); // this now does log the value
    ret2.done; // true now
});
  • @Noseratio: Sorry, I don't really understand what you mean. Where is "assigning to .value" necessary, and what for? Isn't what is returned from a yield expression the argument that is passed to .next()? Feel free to edit my post if it needs correction. – Bergi May 9 '14 at 0:07
  • 1
    Sorry, disregard my last comment, I was wrong. +1. – noseratio May 9 '14 at 0:20
  • @Bergi I'm still a bit confused; what is the actual done function? Is that what is passed into callasync? yield will emit the value of ret2? Why? – Explosion Pills May 9 '14 at 14:41
  • @ExplosionPills: ret1.value/callasync is the function that takes the callback, it will be called with next as the done parameter, yes. The yield does emit the res (which was passed into .next()) as the console.log argument - that's how generators work. – Bergi May 10 '14 at 15:03
2

I posted a detailed explanation of how generators work here.

In a simplified form, your code might look like this without co (untested):

function workAsync(fileName)
{
    // async logic
    var worker = (function* () {

        function read(path) {
            return function (done) {
                fs.readFile(path, "file", done);
            }
        }

        console.log(yield read(fileName));
    })();

    // driver
    function nextStep(err, result) {
        try {
            var item = err? 
                worker.throw(err):
                worker.next(result);
            if (item.done)
                return;
            item.value(nextStep);
        }
        catch(ex) {
            console.log(ex.message);
            return;
        }
    }

    // first step
    nextStep();
}

workAsync("file");

The driver part of workAsync asynchronously iterates through the generator object, by calling nextStep().

  • @ExplosionPills, when item.value(nextStep) is called, nextStep is what corresponds to done, and item.value corresponds to the function which is returned by read(path), when the latter gets called next to the yield statement, inside the worker generator. – noseratio May 10 '14 at 2:20

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.