6

I don't know how to make a struct or object as threadprivate, what I'm doing generates a error:

    struct point2d{
        int x;
        int y;
        point2d(){
            x = 0;
            y = 0;
        }
        //copy constructor
        point2d(point2d& p){
            x = p.x;
            y = p.y;
        }
    };      

I declare a static structure and try to make them threadprivate

    static  point2d myPoint;
    #pragma omp threadprivate(myPoint)

It generates an error:

error C3057: 'myPoint' : dynamic initialization of 'threadprivate' symbols is not currently supported

Does it means that current openmp compiler doesn't support this to make a struct threadprivate? Or what I'm doing is wrong. Is there any alternate way to pass a struct or object?

Here's rest part of my codes:

    void myfunc(){
        printf("myPoint at %p\n",&myPoint);
    }

    void main(){
    #pragma omp parallel
       {
           printf("myPoint at %p\n",&myPoint);
           myfunc();
       }

    }
7
  • Are you compiling this with a C compiler or C++? I see you tagged it as both. It looks like it may not like the constructor. To elaborate, it looks like it may not like that it would call a constructor to initialize the data, rather than a static copy from .text.
    – rjp
    May 8, 2014 at 20:58
  • I'm using vc++, do you mean it's better to pass it manually? May 8, 2014 at 21:02
  • It just appears to me that threadprivate variables need to be statically initialized. I'm not sure how to go about doing that without ditching the constructor, and just writing a function initPoint2d(point2d& p, int inX, int inY). That violates 'the rules' of OO, though, I believe. I'm a C guy.
    – rjp
    May 8, 2014 at 21:05
  • I didn't get that, where should I put the initPoint2d() function? In the constructor? May 8, 2014 at 22:05
  • I'm totally confused about how to do static initialization. It seems like any constructor runs before main() are considered as static initialization, I tried this, but still generates this error May 8, 2014 at 22:11

2 Answers 2

5

In C++ a struct with methods is a Class where the default is public. It's not plain-old-data (POD). MSVC seems to imply that it can handle threadprivate objects (i.e. non-POD) but I can't seem to get it to work. I did get it working in GCC like this:

extern point2d myPoint;
#pragma omp threadprivate(myPoint)
point2d myPoint;

But there is a work around which will work with MSVC (as well as GCC and ICC). You can use threadprivate pointers.

The purpuse of threadprivate is to have private version of an object/type for each thread and have the values persistent between parallel regions. You can do that by delcaring a pointer to point2d, making that threadprivate, and then allocating memory for the private pointer for each thread in a parallel region. Make sure you delete the allocated memory at your last parallel call.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <omp.h>

struct point2d {
    int x;
    int y;
    point2d(){
        x = 0;
        y = 0;
    }
    //copy constructor
    point2d(point2d& p){
        x = p.x;
        y = p.y;
    }
};      

static point2d *myPoint;
#pragma omp threadprivate(myPoint)

int main() {

    #pragma omp parallel 
    {
        myPoint = new point2d();
        myPoint->x = omp_get_thread_num();
        myPoint->y = omp_get_thread_num()*10;
        #pragma omp critical
        {
            printf("thread %d myPoint->x %d myPoint->y %d\n", omp_get_thread_num(),myPoint->x, myPoint->y);
        }
    }   
    #pragma omp parallel
    {
        #pragma omp critical
        {
            printf("thread %d myPoint->x %d myPoint->y %d\n", omp_get_thread_num(),myPoint->x, myPoint->y);
        }
        delete myPoint;
    }
}
0
2

What you do in your code is completely correct. Quoting the OpenMP standard (emphasis mine):

A threadprivate variable with class type must have:

  • an accessible, unambiguous default constructor in case of default initialization without a given initializer;
  • an accessible, unambiguous constructor accepting the given argument in case of direct initialization;
  • an accessible, unambiguous copy constructor in case of copy initialization with an explicit initializer.

The one in bold seems exactly your case.

The behavior you encounter seems a missing feature or a bug in the compiler. Strangely enough, even GCC seems to have problem with that, while Intel is claimed to work fine.

8
  • GCC works fine. You do extern point2d myPoint; #pragma ompthreadprivate(myPoint) <newline> point2d myPoint; Here is a working example in GCC coliru.stacked-crooked.com/a/f156e0122760fe12
    – Z boson
    May 9, 2014 at 8:57
  • @Zboson Here it's the keyword static that seems to trigger the error on non-POD types May 9, 2014 at 9:35
  • Change static to extern and remove the delcarations of myPoint in that example and it works coliru.stacked-crooked.com/a/a274f6a4c5f63568
    – Z boson
    May 9, 2014 at 9:47
  • Using threadprivate pointers as I suggested seems to be a good cross-compiler solution but it's easy to make errors onallocation/reallocation. There's no ideal solution.
    – Z boson
    May 9, 2014 at 9:50
  • 1
    @CharlesChow it depends on how you define the static variable. If you define it by copy-construction, then you need a copy-constructor. Otherwise you'll need an ordinary constructor. May 9, 2014 at 16:27

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