1

Alright, I'm having an issue trying to mix frameworks. So, I have a @SharedPref annotated class that should generate a Shared Preferences manager from Android Annotations. The class looks a bit something like this:

DownloadPrefs.java

@SharedPref(value= SharedPref.Scope.UNIQUE)
public interface DownloadPrefs {

    @DefaultBoolean(false)
    boolean hasEnabledDownload();

    @DefaultBoolean(false)
    boolean showedDownloadDialog();

    @DefaultLong(0)
    long downloadRefreshedOn();
}

Now, I'd like to inject the resulting class (which will be DownloadPrefs_) into a Fragment to make use of it. The fragment has had working injection before adding the new module, so I'm only going to write here what I added:

Fragment.java

@Inject DownloadPrefs_ downloadPrefs;

Now, since the actual DownloadPrefs_ class is generated at runtime, it would make the most sense to create an @Provides annotation for it, since I can't mark a constructor as injected. Nor does the DownloadPrefs_ have a no-arg constructor. The module I'm using then receives the new @Provides:

DownloaderModule.java

@Provides //@Singleton // Does not work with/out @Singleton
DownloadPrefs_ provideDownloadPrefs() {
    return new DownloadPrefs_(MinimalBible.getApplication());
}

To be technical about it, the DownloadPrefs_ constructor that gets generated by Android Annotations expects a Context passed to it, I would have guessed that the Application context would be suitable. Otherwise, I'm not sure how I could possibly get access to the Activity context. Or whether that would actually break the ObjectGraph.

However, when I go to run the actual injection, I get the following message:

Caused by: java.lang.IllegalStateException: Errors creating object graph:
    org.bspeice.minimalbible.activities.downloader.DownloadPrefs_ has no injectable members. Do you want to add an injectable constructor? required by class org.bspeice.minimalbible.activities.downloader.BookListFragment

Any clue on what's going on? It doesn't seem like the questions asking about "no injectable members" on other SO questions answered my case. I had a working app before adding the code above.

UPDATE: After doing some double-checking, I came across the following weird behavior. If I copy out the pre-built Android Annotations class, rename it, and inject that, everything works. Additionally, I can verify that the original built Android Annotations class (the DownloadPrefs_.java) does in fact exist in the .dex, so Dagger should have no reason to not be able to find it. Everything is doing a debug build, so I can't imagine ProGuard is messing anything up.

At this point, I'm going to create a minimal project to demonstrate the error, and file an issue with Dagger. In the mean time, just need to rewrite the Prefs class until I can get this sorted out.

UPDATE 5/12/2014

Here are the modules responsible for injection:

MinimalBibleModules.java

@Module(
    injects = {
        MinimalBible.class
    },
    includes = {
        ActivityModules.class
    }
)
public class MinimalBibleModules {
}

ActivityModules.java

@Module(
    includes = {
        ActivityDownloaderModule.class
    }
)
public class ActivityModules {
}

ActivityDownloaderModule.java

@Module(
        injects = {
            BookListFragment.class,
            DownloadManager.class,
            BookRefreshTask.class
        }
)
public class ActivityDownloaderModule {

    @Provides @Singleton
    DownloadManager provideDownloadManager() {
        return new DownloadManager();
    }

    @Provides
    EventBus provideBus() {
        return new EventBus();
    }


    @Provides //@Singleton
    DownloadPrefs_ provideDownloadPrefs() {
        return new DownloadPrefs_(MinimalBible.getApplication());
    }
}

Also, how the graph gets created:

MinimalBible.java

public class MinimalBible extends Application {

    private ObjectGraph graph;

    private static MinimalBible instance;

    public MinimalBible() {
        instance = this;        
    }

    @Override
    public void onCreate() {
        graph = ObjectGraph.create(new MinimalBibleModules());
        graph.inject(this);
    }
5
  • Created Github issue #410 with Dagger, all further discussion will likely take place there.
    – dj_bushido
    May 10, 2014 at 22:51
  • I would usually blame proguard - in particular make sure it's not killing things - but if you're saying this happens when there is no proguard, I'm then confused. Does the @Provides line in DownloaderModule compile? If so, then proguard shoudln't strip it out. Are you including DownloaderModule in your main module with which you configure the graph? Can you please add a shell of your main module, the line you create the graph with, and the properties you set on the @Module annotations? That's important to see if you're hooking everything up well. May 12, 2014 at 20:44
  • This project uses AndroidAnnotation and generated class DownloadPrefs_ doesn't have any injection declared inside.
    – Mikooos
    May 12, 2014 at 20:59
  • Everything compiles correctly, which is why this is strange. Proguard doesn't seem to be running (it doesn't run for debug builds right? I haven't touched the configuration). I'll add the relevant code from the repository to the question now.
    – dj_bushido
    May 12, 2014 at 23:20
  • @dj_bushido can you tell me why we need to add below code ? injects = { BookListFragment.class, DownloadManager.class, BookRefreshTask.class } in activitydownloadmodule.class ?
    – gandhi
    Dec 2, 2014 at 5:09

1 Answer 1

1

There are two parts here. First, how you get access to the Context. You can do static things as you are, though that's not advisable. Generally, you should configure your graph with a stateful module that carries the context, like this:

@Module
class ApplicationModule {
  private final Application application;

  public ApplicationModule(Application app) {
    this.application = app;
  }

  // you can mark this singleton, but it's minor overhead
  // and the fact that you have a single instance stored
  // means it's semantically equivalent. But for clarity
  // it's sometimes good to make the point.
  @Provides 
  @Singleton 
  Application application() {
    return application;
  }

  // optionally: bind it as a Context with a qualifier.
  // note: never bind Context without a qualifier annotation
  // as Activity and Application are both Context subtypes.
  @Provides 
  @Singleton 
  @PerApplication 
  Context appContext(Application app) {

    // Doing this instead of returning this.application is 
    // semantically equivalent but links @PerApplication Context
    // to Application, so in graph analysis and error reporting
    // the link is clearer. That's a personal choice. 
    return app; 
  }
}

At any rate, you then when you create the graph:

Application appInstance = ...;
ObjectGraph appGraph = ObjectGraph.create(
    MyAppModule.class, 
    new ApplicationModule(appInstance));

The Application is then seeded into the graph and can be depended-upon by other types that declare it as a dependency.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.