8

After namespace, class, struct, enum, for, foreach, while, switch, do, using, unchecked and at the beginning of methods, shouldn't Visual Studio automatically include curly brackets? How to activate this feature?

3
  • 2
    How would it know when to start the curly brace? public class MyClass? public class MyClass : MyBase? public class MyClass : MyBase, Interface, Interface 2? You can see where knowing when to start would be a pain in most cases...automatically matching your open brace with a closing one, that's doable. – Nick Craver Mar 1 '10 at 12:57
  • 3
    Why would it put in a curly brace after a while statement if I will only put one statement in the loop? – Binary Worrier Mar 1 '10 at 12:59
  • 2
    To conform with Microsoft coding style guidelines for starters... – Joe Mar 1 '10 at 13:12
3

One option is to use Code Snippets. Visual Studio already comes with snippets for namespace, enum, for, foreach, while, switch, do, using, and unchecked. For instructions on how to use snippets go here.

If you can think of a snippet that makes sense for your class and struct you can create your own snippet.

5

With Resharper curly closing bracket adds by itself (either right away or after pressing enter). I think it's also the case for non-resharped Visual Studio but not 100% sure about that. Only opening bracket you have to write by yourself.

Currently Resharper 5.0 is free (as long as it's in beta/night build status), you just have to reinstall it every 20-30 days (but you would want to do it anyway since they tend to fix/add things). I can't code without Resharper anymore :-) It's so much time saver! Not sure what i will do when it's no longer beta ;/

Edit:

With Resharper you can even get IDE to use braces or not to use them in some cases (where it's possible). Check out this link about code formatting in Resharper.

4
  • ReSharper code format can also add braces throughout an entire project with just a few clicks. jetbrains.com/resharper/features/code_formatting.html – jrummell Mar 1 '10 at 13:25
  • Or remove them, depending on settings :-) – MadBoy Mar 1 '10 at 13:32
  • My Visual Studio without Resharper doesn't adds closing curly brackets – Jader Dias Mar 1 '10 at 13:44
  • Options -> Text Editor -> C# -> Formatting -> New Lines If that doesn't make it then i guess Resharper is the one making it ;) – MadBoy Mar 1 '10 at 13:55
2

Devexpress have tools for visual studio

CodeRush

1

The IDE can't be sure if you don't want to create a one liner.

Resharper does make things easier though. If you type "{" and press enter the "}" will automatically be generated.

1

If you press CTRL+K, CTRL+S this will give you a snippet of options in which it will automatically create whichever option you select.

1
  • This is Edit.SurroundWith it may be have some other key binding. If sombody don't have it in CTRL+K, CTRL+S they can still get get it from the contextual menu or look at TOOLS -> Options... -> Environment -> Keyboard -> "Edit.SurroundWith" to see what binding they have. – Theraot Oct 11 '12 at 3:53
1

It is very easily and you have not to use R#.

Only write "if, else, for, foreach..." and then press TAB. Curly brackets will be automatically created and your cursor jump to round brackets. If in round brackets is more controls (e.g. for(control1; control2; control3)), then you can switch between this controls with press TAB. If you finished with changing controls, then you can press enter and cursor will jump to body of curly brackets.

But if do you want write new "method, class,..." I usually use general shortcut "ctrl+.".

e.g. Write to some method (e.g. MyMethod) call new method (e.g. MyNewMethod) which not be created yet:

private void MyMethod()
{
  string[] a = this.MyNewMethod(5, "something");
}

Then set cursor to "MyNewMethod", press "ctrl+." and press enter.

New method will be created automatically on the end of this class:

private void MyMethod()
{
  string[] a = this.MyNewMethod(5, "something");
}

private string[] MyNewMethod(int v1, string v2)
{
  throw new NotImplementedException();
}
0

For namespace, class, struct, enum and switch, you're right. The syntax forces you to get an opening brace, but I don't think you can force VS to do this (without using an add-in).

In the other cases, an open brace is optional, and some people want NOT to have the brace if they have only one statement afterwards. So, VS could not add a brace automatically even if it could.

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