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I have faced a problem to count line number using lines() method of BufferedReader. Following is the content of test.txt file.

1 Career
2 Filmography
3 Awards
4 References
5 External

Here is the source code to count line number twice.

  BufferedReader br=new BufferedReader(new FileReader(new File("test.txt")));
  long lineNo=br.lines().count();
  long lineNo2=br.lines().count();

  System.out.println(lineNo); // 5
  System.out.println(lineNo2);// 0

Here, I have question why second line of lineNo2 print 0 instead of 5? Thanks in advance.

  • As a general rule, don't expect a Stream to be reusable following a terminal operation. – Dane White May 10 '14 at 6:31
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The BufferedReader.lines() method returns a stream. Accessing the stream (eg when you perform a count() on it), will read lines from the buffer, moving the current position in the BufferedReader forward.

When you do a count(), the entire stream is read, so the BufferedReader() will - probably - be at the end. A second invocation of lines() will return a stream that will read no lines, because the reader is already at the end of its data.

The javadoc of BufferedReader.lines() specifies:

After execution of the terminal stream operation there are no guarantees that the reader will be at a specific position from which to read the next character or line.

I read this to mean that there is no guarantee that it is immediately after the last line returned from the stream, but as a count consumes all lines, I am pretty sure it is at the end. Going back to the beginning of a reader is (usually) not possible.

If you need to do multiple actions with the data from the BufferedReader.lines() you either need to process to stream once, or you need to collect the data into temporary storage. But note that executing a terminal operation like a count of lines (or a collect) might never complete (eg if the BufferedReader is fed from an infinite source).

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    "Going back to the beginning of a reader is (usually) not possible.". If you have a big enough buffer you could just use mark(), Mark :P – Maarten Bodewes May 9 '14 at 12:17
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    @owlstead Hence my usually ;) – Mark Rotteveel May 9 '14 at 12:19
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From the Javadoc:

After execution of the terminal stream operation there are no guarantees that the reader will be at a specific position from which to read the next character or line.

count() is a terminal operation. Thus the position of the reader is unspecified after the first count()-call.

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  • @BlackPanther Yes, unfortunately it does not explain the behavior above; actually, the stream has progressed to a position to read out the next line. It's just that 1) it hasn't got any more lines and 2) it has not been closed. Note that it says "a position" not "the start position", I think this comment is because operations on the lines may have concluded before everything has been read. – Maarten Bodewes May 9 '14 at 12:11
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    But that is no reason to down vote the answer. It can be clearly inferred from the javadoc quote that the first invocation consumes the data and can no longer be used. "After the terminal operation is performed, the stream pipeline is considered consumed, and can no longer be used" from http://docs.oracle.com/javase/8/docs/api/java/util/stream/package-summary.html#StreamOps – Thirumalai Parthasarathi May 9 '14 at 12:17
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The java 8 API specifies here that

After execution of the terminal stream operation there are no guarantees that the reader will be at a specific position from which to read the next character or line.

So after you execute the br.lines().count() statement there is no guarantee on the pointer's location.

The lines().count() invocation consumes the data from the file and when invoked again without closing the stream. It cannot consume the same data again by invoking br.lines().count().

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    I think it is safe to assume that a BufferedReader (or any reader or inputstream) will never go back to a starting position (except when explicitly requested with mark(..) and reset(), if supported); the warning conveys that the position might not be what you expected from the last line you consumed from the stream (eg immediately after that line). – Mark Rotteveel May 9 '14 at 12:18
  • @BlackPanther "So after you execute the br.lines() statement there is no guarantee on the pointer's location." Note that count() is the terminal operation not lines(). – Puce May 9 '14 at 12:22

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