35

I have a function

def foo(bar):
    #do some things
    len(bar)

If I call

foo(42)

it throws an exception of

TypeError: object of type 'int' has no len()

How do I check if the entered value can be used with len()?

4 Answers 4

48

You can do:

if hasattr(bar, '__len__'):
    pass

Alternatively, you can catch the TypeError.

2
  • 2
    Wouldn't this need to be __len__ in dir(bar)? Either way, using hasattr is better if you go with this approach
    – Daenyth
    May 9, 2014 at 14:54
  • 3
    Even an object has __len__ attribute, it doesn't mean it's valid (or OP should define what is valid). For example, a class can define a __len__ function which returns a str, and it will pass the hasattr test but still throw the TypeError exception when you call len() on it. This is exactly what exception handling is designed for, punish them for giving me dirty input.
    – Nier
    Apr 8, 2016 at 3:45
23

You can test if the object is Sized:

import collections.abc

if isinstance(bar, collections.abc.Sized):

The isinstance() test is true if all abstract methods of Sized are implemented; in this case that's just __len__.

Personally, I'd just catch the exception instead:

try:
    foo(42)
except TypeError:
    pass  # oops, no length
0
7

Since len() calls __len__() magic method under the hood, you can check if an object has __len__ method defined with the help of hasattr():

>>> def has_len(obj):
...     return hasattr(obj, '__len__')
... 
>>> has_len([1,2,3])
True
>>> has_len('test')
True
>>> has_len(1)
False
5

You can do it using try and except for best results:

def foo(bar):
    #do some things
    try:
        print(len(bar))
    except TypeError:
        print('Input not compatible with len()')
1
  • As a general rule, that's arguably the most Pythonic, duck-typing approach. It doesn't work for some use cases, e.g. list or dict comprehensions. Feb 17, 2021 at 3:39

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