23

I am writing a batch file that executes a Powershell script that at one point loops items with UNC paths as attributes and uses Get-ChildItem on those paths. In a minimal version, this is what is happening in my scripts:

Master.bat

powershell -ExecutionPolicy ByPass -File "Slave.ps1"

Slave.ps1

$foo = @{Name = "Foo"}
$foo.Path = "\\remote-server\foothing"

$bar = @{Name = "Bar"}
$bar.Path = "\\remote-server\barthing"

@( $foo, $bar ) | ForEach-Object {
    $item = Get-ChildItem $_.Path
    # Do things with item
}

The problem I'm running into is that when I run Master.bat, it fails at Get-ChildItem with an error along the lines of

get-childitem : Cannot find path '\\remote-server\foothing' because it does not exist.

However, it seems to work perfectly fine if I run the Slave.ps1 file directly using Powershell. Why might this be happening only when the Master.bat file is run?

Things I have tried

  • Prepending the UNC paths with FileSystem:: with providers http://powershell.org/wp/2014/02/20/powershell-gotcha-unc-paths-and-providers/
  • Making sure there are no strange characters in the actual paths
  • Using the -literalPath parameter instead of the plain -path parameter for Get-ChildItem
  • Running Get-ChildItem \\remote-server\foothing in PowerShell and succeeding to verify connection to the remote server
7
  • 1
    How is the batch file being run? Are you just double clicking it to run it? Is it being run by the task scheduler? Is it your credentials that are running the script when the batch file is run? – TheMadTechnician May 9 '14 at 22:14
  • @TheMadTechnician It's being run as an administrator by right clicking the .bat file then clicking 'Run as Administrator' – Jon Chan May 9 '14 at 22:33
  • When running as administrator does it prompt for credentials? Do you get the same errors if you simply run the batch file instead of running it as administrator? – TheMadTechnician May 9 '14 at 22:48
  • No difference between running as administrator and without. The error comes up regardless. – Jon Chan May 10 '14 at 6:01
  • What version of PowerShell are you running? I am unable to replicate the issue using PowerShell v4 or v3 – TheMadTechnician May 12 '14 at 23:01
45
+25

I have found this issue when running scripts referring to UNC paths - but the error only occurs when the root of the script is set to a non file system location. e.g. PS SQLSEVER\

So the following fails with the same error:

cd env:
$foo = @{Name = "Foo"}
$foo.Path = "\\remote-server\foothing"

$bar = @{Name = "Bar"}
$bar.Path = "\\remote-server\barthing"

@( $foo, $bar ) | ForEach-Object {
    $item = Get-ChildItem $_.Path
    # Do things with item
     Write-Host $item
}

So my resolution was to ensure that the PS prompt was returned to a file system location before executing this code. e.g.

cd env:
$foo = @{Name = "Foo"}
$foo.Path = "\\remote-server\foothing"

$bar = @{Name = "Bar"}
$bar.Path = "\\remote-server\barthing"

cd c: #THIS IS THE CRITICAL LINE
@( $foo, $bar ) | ForEach-Object {
    $item = Get-ChildItem $_.Path
    # Do things with item
     Write-Host $item
}

I hope this helps - I would be very happy with the bounty as this is my first answer on stack overflow. P.S. I forgot to add - the PS command prompt root may be set by auto loaded modules in the configuration of your machine. I would check with Get-Location to see if you are actually executng from a non FileSystem location.

4
  • 2
    +1 You, sir, are a genius. I've spent bloody hours trying to figure out why this wasn't working for me!! Many thanks indeed. – Steve365 Jun 2 '15 at 10:53
  • 2
    Thank you, Thank you, Thank you!! I had the same Problem script was failing and kicking me back to PS SQLSEVER\. – Chris Jun 15 '15 at 19:26
  • 2
    +1 Very good, I do cd $pwd to not mess up other paths, but this was hard to find withouth your suggestion! – Rogier Jul 14 '15 at 13:02
  • 7 years later - your still helping!! – Joe B Jun 9 at 20:42
12

Rory's answer provides an effective workaround, but there's a solution that doesn't require changing the current location to a FileSystem provider location first:

Prefix your UNC paths with FileSystem:: to ensure that they are recognized correctly, irrespective of the current location:

$foo = @{
   Name = "Foo"
   Path = "FileSystem::\\remote-server\foothing"
}

$bar = @{
   Name = "Bar"
   Path = "FileSystem::\\remote-server\barthing"
}

Alternatively, here is a tweak to Rory's answer to avoid changing the current location session-globally (to preserve whatever the current location is), using Push-Location and Pop-Location:

try {
  # Switch to the *filesystem provider's* current location, whatever it is.
  Push-Location (Get-Location -PSProvider FileSystem)

  # Process the paths.
  $foo, $bar | ForEach-Object {
      $item = Get-ChildItem $_.Path
      # Do things with item
  }
} finally {
   # Restore the previous location.
   Pop-Location
}

Optional background information

This excellent blog post explains the underlying problem (emphasis added):

PowerShell doesn't recognize [UNC paths] as "rooted" because they're not on a PSDrive; as such, whatever provider is associated with PowerShell's current location will attempt to handle them.

Adding prefix FileSystem:: unambiguously identifies the path as being a FileSystem provider path, irrespective of the provider underlying the current location.

2
  • 1
    I've been struggling for a while, your solution worked perfectly to me. Even though when I checked the line before with [System.IO.Directory]::Exists($path), I was having errors with Get-ChildItem -Path $path Adding FileSystem:: fixed it. – kerzek Oct 1 '18 at 19:53
  • Glad to hear it, @kerzek. Yes, using [System.IO.Directory]::Exists($path) always works, because .NET only knows about filesystem paths, unlike PowerShell with its multiple drive providers. – mklement0 Oct 1 '18 at 19:58
-1

I read somewhere else about the Push-Location and Pop-Location commands to counter this kind of problem - I landed on your question while manually, step-by-step, testing a new routine where the script has push/pop, but I forgot to do them on my PS window. After checking @Rory's answer I noticed I was on PS SQLServer:\ instead of PS C:\ prompt.

So a way to use this on your "slave" script would be:

$foo = @{Name = "Foo"}
$foo.Path = "\\remote-server\foothing"

$bar = @{Name = "Bar"}
$bar.Path = "\\remote-server\barthing"

@( $foo, $bar ) | ForEach-Object {
    $item = Get-ChildItem $_.Path
    Push-Location
    # Do things with item
    Pop-Location
}

Thought of adding the Push/Pop before and after the # Do things because it seems that it's those things that change the location.

1
  • While using Push-Location / Pop-Location to temporarily switch to a filesystem location is a good idea, your solution won't work, because (a) your Push-Location command comes after Get-ChildItem, which is where the error surfaces and (b), even if you changed the order, Push-Location without arguments just pushes the current location onto the stack of remembered locations, it doesn't switch to a filesystem location, which is what is needed here. – mklement0 Oct 1 '18 at 20:09

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.