3

So. I have a routine that is crawling a network. The routine is seeded with a list of IPs and keeps track of the IPs that it finds while crawling the devices. When it finds new IPs, it crawls those also.

Here is my problem. I run the initial scan of the seeded IPs in a parallel foreach, and also launch the IPs i find on each device in a parallel foreach, so i could end up with 10 threads spawning 10 threads each for a total of 100 threads (or more if those threads find devices of their own). I want to limit the total number of threads used by the entire process (to say 25).

Can that be done in C#'s task library?

I know about the MaxDegreeOfParallelism property on the foreach loop, but can it be shared?

  • Yes ParallelOptions can be shared. – elios264 May 10 '14 at 0:38
  • Your question talks about threads, but Parallel.ForEach uses tasks, which do not map 1-1 with threads. What makes you think that you need to adjust the level of parallelism? – KevinS May 10 '14 at 1:09
  • elios, sure, you can share the object, but it doesn't limit the total threads/tasks being used by the routine. Kevin, tasks/threads aren't important here. In my use case, I sometimes need to limit the total cpu usage for performance reasons. – Jason Wall May 10 '14 at 18:04
3

How about pushing those tasks into a shared task factory? How to: Create a Task Scheduler That Limits Concurrency

0

Agent Shark's answer did the trick. I thought I would share my working example, and discuss a few things I encountered.

At first, I was using nested Parallel.ForEach loops. But It occurred to me that if I limit the thread/task count to a # less than the total in the first loop, then there would be no threads to handle the second, thus the routine would never complete. So that wouldn't work at all.

That left Agent Shark's idea of a shared Queue you could push tasks onto that would get run when threads were freed up.

Here is what my solution looked like.

    internal class Program
    {
        private static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            // setup the factory
            LimitedConcurrencyLevelTaskScheduler lcts = new LimitedConcurrencyLevelTaskScheduler(9);
            TaskFactory f = new TaskFactory(lcts);

            // create my shared task queue
            ConcurrentDictionary<string, Task> waiting = new ConcurrentDictionary<string, Task>();
            ConcurrentBag<Task> finished = new ConcurrentBag<Task>();

            // some numbers....
            List<int> nums = new List<int>() { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 0 };

            foreach (int n in nums)
            {
                int i = n; // if you don't do this, n is 0 when it writes to the Debug console....
                Task t = f.StartNew(() =>
                {
                    Debug.WriteLine(i);

                    // some more numbers....
                    List<int> other = new List<int>() { 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20 };

                    foreach (int nm in other)
                    {
                        int j = i;
                        int w = nm;
                        Task tk = f.StartNew(() =>
                        {
                            Debug.WriteLine(j + "," + w);
                            Thread.Sleep(1000);
                        });
                        waiting.TryAdd(j + "," + w, tk);
                    }

                    Thread.Sleep(500);
                });
                waiting.TryAdd(i.ToString(), t);
            }

            // loop until no further tasks are waiting.
            while (waiting.Count > 0)
            {
                // run the tasks...
                Task.WaitAll(waiting.Values.ToArray());

                // remove the finised tasks from the waiting list.
                foreach (KeyValuePair<string, Task> pair in waiting)
                {
                    if (pair.Value.IsCompleted)
                    {
                        finished.Add(pair.Value);
                        Task o;
                        waiting.TryRemove(pair.Key, out o);
                    }
                }

                Thread.Sleep(100);
            }
        }
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Provides a task scheduler that ensures a maximum concurrency level while
    /// running on top of the ThreadPool.
    /// </summary>
    public class LimitedConcurrencyLevelTaskScheduler : TaskScheduler
    {
        /// <summary>Whether the current thread is processing work items.</summary>
        [ThreadStatic]
        private static bool _currentThreadIsProcessingItems;

        /// <summary>The list of tasks to be executed.</summary>
        private readonly LinkedList<Task> _tasks = new LinkedList<Task>(); // protected by lock(_tasks)

        /// <summary>The maximum concurrency level allowed by this scheduler.</summary>
        private readonly int _maxDegreeOfParallelism;

        /// <summary>Whether the scheduler is currently processing work items.</summary>
        private int _delegatesQueuedOrRunning = 0; // protected by lock(_tasks)

        /// <summary>
        /// Initializes an instance of the LimitedConcurrencyLevelTaskScheduler class with the
        /// specified degree of parallelism.
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="maxDegreeOfParallelism">The maximum degree of parallelism provided by this scheduler.</param>
        public LimitedConcurrencyLevelTaskScheduler(int maxDegreeOfParallelism)
        {
            if (maxDegreeOfParallelism < 1) throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("maxDegreeOfParallelism");
            _maxDegreeOfParallelism = maxDegreeOfParallelism;
        }

        /// <summary>Queues a task to the scheduler.</summary>
        /// <param name="task">The task to be queued.</param>
        protected sealed override void QueueTask(Task task)
        {
            // Add the task to the list of tasks to be processed.  If there aren't enough
            // delegates currently queued or running to process tasks, schedule another.
            lock (_tasks)
            {
                _tasks.AddLast(task);
                if (_delegatesQueuedOrRunning < _maxDegreeOfParallelism)
                {
                    ++_delegatesQueuedOrRunning;
                    NotifyThreadPoolOfPendingWork();
                }
            }
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Informs the ThreadPool that there's work to be executed for this scheduler.
        /// </summary>
        private void NotifyThreadPoolOfPendingWork()
        {
            ThreadPool.UnsafeQueueUserWorkItem(_ =>
            {
                // Note that the current thread is now processing work items.
                // This is necessary to enable inlining of tasks into this thread.
                _currentThreadIsProcessingItems = true;
                try
                {
                    // Process all available items in the queue.
                    while (true)
                    {
                        Task item;
                        lock (_tasks)
                        {
                            // When there are no more items to be processed,
                            // note that we're done processing, and get out.
                            if (_tasks.Count == 0)
                            {
                                --_delegatesQueuedOrRunning;
                                break;
                            }

                            // Get the next item from the queue
                            item = _tasks.First.Value;
                            _tasks.RemoveFirst();
                        }

                        // Execute the task we pulled out of the queue
                        base.TryExecuteTask(item);
                    }
                }
                // We're done processing items on the current thread
                finally { _currentThreadIsProcessingItems = false; }
            }, null);
        }

        /// <summary>Attempts to execute the specified task on the current thread.</summary>
        /// <param name="task">The task to be executed.</param>
        /// <param name="taskWasPreviouslyQueued"></param>
        /// <returns>Whether the task could be executed on the current thread.</returns>
        protected sealed override bool TryExecuteTaskInline(Task task, bool taskWasPreviouslyQueued)
        {
            // If this thread isn't already processing a task, we don't support inlining
            if (!_currentThreadIsProcessingItems) return false;

            // If the task was previously queued, remove it from the queue
            if (taskWasPreviouslyQueued) TryDequeue(task);

            // Try to run the task.
            return base.TryExecuteTask(task);
        }

        /// <summary>Attempts to remove a previously scheduled task from the scheduler.</summary>
        /// <param name="task">The task to be removed.</param>
        /// <returns>Whether the task could be found and removed.</returns>
        protected sealed override bool TryDequeue(Task task)
        {
            lock (_tasks) return _tasks.Remove(task);
        }

        /// <summary>Gets the maximum concurrency level supported by this scheduler.</summary>
        public sealed override int MaximumConcurrencyLevel { get { return _maxDegreeOfParallelism; } }

        /// <summary>Gets an enumerable of the tasks currently scheduled on this scheduler.</summary>
        /// <returns>An enumerable of the tasks currently scheduled.</returns>
        protected sealed override IEnumerable<Task> GetScheduledTasks()
        {
            bool lockTaken = false;
            try
            {
                Monitor.TryEnter(_tasks, ref lockTaken);
                if (lockTaken) return _tasks.ToArray();
                else throw new NotSupportedException();
            }
            finally
            {
                if (lockTaken) Monitor.Exit(_tasks);
            }
        }
    }
  • I don't really understand why it is necessary to set int i = n. Something to do with clojures i think. If i don't set i = n and use i, then n ends up being 0 for all threads. – Jason Wall May 10 '14 at 18:02
  • because C# is weird and keeps an object reference to that int in the case of a for loop with a captured variable. – Martin Capodici May 26 '16 at 2:33

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