72

A use case emerged when wanting to do a contitional copy (1. doable with copy_if) but from a container of values to a container of pointers to those values (2. doable with transform).

With the available tools I can't do it in less than two steps :

#include <vector>
#include <algorithm>

using namespace std;

struct ha { 
    int i;
    explicit ha(int a) : i(a) {}
};

int main() 
{
    vector<ha> v{ ha{1}, ha{7}, ha{1} }; // initial vector
    // GOAL : make a vector of pointers to elements with i < 2
    vector<ha*> ph; // target vector
    vector<ha*> pv; // temporary vector
    // 1. 
    transform(v.begin(), v.end(), back_inserter(pv), 
        [](ha &arg) { return &arg; }); 
    // 2. 
    copy_if(pv.begin(), pv.end(), back_inserter(ph),
        [](ha *parg) { return parg->i < 2;  }); // 2. 

    return 0;
}

Ofcourse we could call remove_if on pv and eliminate the need for a temporary, better yet though, it's not difficult to implement (for unary operations) something like this :

template <
    class InputIterator, class OutputIterator, 
    class UnaryOperator, class Pred
>
OutputIterator transform_if(InputIterator first1, InputIterator last1,
                            OutputIterator result, UnaryOperator op, Pred pred)
{
    while (first1 != last1) 
    {
        if (pred(*first1)) {
            *result = op(*first1);
            ++result;
        }
        ++first1;
    }
    return result;
}

// example call 
transform_if(v.begin(), v.end(), back_inserter(ph), 
[](ha &arg) { return &arg;      }, // 1. 
[](ha &arg) { return arg.i < 2; });// 2.
  1. Is there a more elegant workaround with the available C++ standard library tools ?
  2. Is there a reason why transform_if does not exist in the library? Is the combination of the existing tools a sufficient workaround and/or considered performance wise well behaved ?
  • (IMO) The name transform_if implies "only transform if a certain predicate is satisfied". A more descriptive name for what you want would be copy_if_and_transform! – Oliver Charlesworth May 10 '14 at 10:23
  • @OliCharlesworth, actually copy_if also implies "only copy if a certain predicate is satisfied". It's equally ambiguous. – Shahbaz May 10 '14 at 10:25
  • @Shahbaz: But that's what copy_if does, right? – Oliver Charlesworth May 10 '14 at 10:27
  • 2
    I wouldn't be suprised if disputes about the name of such a thing were the actuall reason for not implementing it !! – Nikos Athanasiou May 10 '14 at 10:27
  • 6
    Maybe I'm missing something in these comments, but how could transform_if possibly copy those elements it doesn't transform, if the transformation can be to a different incompatible type? The implementation in the question is exactly what I would expect such a function to do. – user743382 May 10 '14 at 10:33
33

The standard library favours elementary algorithms.

Containers and algorithms should be independent of each other if possible.

Likewise, algorithms that can be composed of existing algorithms are only rarely included, as shorthand.

If you require a transform if, you can trivially write it. If you want it /today/, composing of ready-mades and not incur overhead, you can use a range library that has lazy ranges, such as Boost.Range, e.g.:

v | filtered(arg1 % 2) | transformed(arg1 * arg1 / 7.0)

As @hvd points out in a comment, transform_if double result in a different type (double, in this case). Composition order matters, and with Boost Range you could also write:

 v | transformed(arg1 * arg1 / 7.0) | filtered(arg1 < 2.0)

resulting in different semantics. This drives home the point:

it makes very little sense to include std::filter_and_transform, std::transform_and_filter, std::filter_transform_and_filter etc. etc. into the standard library.

See a sample Live On Coliru

#include <boost/range/algorithm.hpp>
#include <boost/range/adaptors.hpp>

using namespace boost::adaptors;

// only for succinct predicates without lambdas
#include <boost/phoenix.hpp>
using namespace boost::phoenix::arg_names;

// for demo
#include <iostream>

int main()
{
    std::vector<int> const v { 1,2,3,4,5 };

    boost::copy(
            v | filtered(arg1 % 2) | transformed(arg1 * arg1 / 7.0),
            std::ostream_iterator<double>(std::cout, "\n"));
}
  • 20
    Well, the problem is that the standard algorithms can't be easily composed, because they are not lazy. – Jan Hudec May 10 '14 at 10:32
  • 1
    @JanHudec Indeed. (sorry about that? :)). Which is why you use a library (much like you use AMP/TBB for concurrency, or Reactive Extensions in C#). Many people are working on a range proposition + implementation for inclusion into the standard. – sehe May 10 '14 at 10:38
  • 2
    @sehe +1 Very impressive, I have learned something new today! Would you be so kind as to tell us who are not familiar with Boost.Range and Phoenix where we can find the documentation/examples that explains how to use boost::phoenix to make such nice predicates without lambdas? A quick google search returned nothing relevant. Thanks! – Ali May 10 '14 at 12:33
  • 1
    I disagree regarding the "it makes very little sense to include std::filter_and_transform" part. Other programming languages also provide this combination in their "standard library". It totally makes sense to iterate over a list of elements once, transforming them on the fly, while skipping those that cannot be transformed. Other approaches require more than one pass. Yes, you can use BOOST, but the question actually was "Why is there no transform_if in the C++ standard library?". And IMHO, he is right to question this. There should be such a function in the standard library. – Jonny Dee May 28 '18 at 7:49
  • 1
    @sehe Regarding "they all use composable abstractions": that's not true. Rust, for instance, has exactly such a transform_if. It's called filter_map. However, I must admit it's there to simplify code but, on the other hand, one could apply the same argument in the C++ case. – Jonny Dee May 28 '18 at 13:21
5

The new for loop notation in many ways reduces the need for algorithms that access every element of the collection where it is now cleaner to just write a loop and put the logic inplace.

std::vector< decltype( op( begin(coll) ) > output;
for( auto const& elem : coll )
{
   if( pred( elem ) )
   {
        output.push_back( op( elem ) );
   }
}

Does it really provide a lot of value now to put in an algorithm? Whilst yes, the algorithm would have been useful for C++03 and indeed I had one for it, we don't need one now so no real advantage in adding it.

Note that in practical use your code won't always look exactly like that either: you don't necessarily have functions "op" and "pred" and may have to create lambdas to make them "fit" into algorithms. Whilst it is nice to separate out concerns if the logic is complex, if it is just a matter of extracting a member from the input type and checking its value or adding it to the collection, it's a lot simpler once again than using an algorithm.

In addition, once you are adding some kind of transform_if, you have to decide whether to apply the predicate before or after the transform, or even have 2 predicates and apply it in both places.

So what are we going to do? Add 3 algorithms? (And in the case that the compiler could apply the predicate on either end of the convert, a user could easily pick the wrong algorithm by mistake and the code still compile but produce wrong results).

Also, if the collections are large, does the user want to loop with iterators or map/reduce? With the introduction of map/reduce you get even more complexities in the equation.

Essentially, the library provides the tools, and the user is left here to use them to fit what they want to do, not the other way round as was often the case with algorithms. (See how the user above tried to twist things using accumulate to fit what they really wanted to do).

For a simple example, a map. For each element I will output the value if the key is even.

std::vector< std::string > valuesOfEvenKeys
    ( std::map< int, std::string > const& keyValues )
{
    std::vector< std::string > res;
    for( auto const& elem: keyValues )
    {
        if( elem.first % 2 == 0 )
        {
            res.push_back( elem.second );
        }
    }
    return res;
}         

Nice and simple. Fancy fitting that into a transform_if algorithm?

  • 3
    If you think my code above has more room for errors than a transform_if with 2 lambdas, one for the predicate and one for the transform, then please explain it. Assembly, C and C++ are different languages and have different places. The only place the algorithm may be at an advantage over a loop is the ability to "map/reduce" so run concurrently over large collections. However this way the user can control whether to loop in sequence or map-reduce. – CashCow Apr 9 '15 at 10:41
  • 3
    In a proper functional approach functions for predicate and mutator are well defined blocks which make the construct properly structured. For loop body can have arbitrary things in it, and every loop you see has to be carefully analyzed to understand its behavior. – Bartek Banachewicz Apr 9 '15 at 10:48
  • 2
    Leave the proper functional approach for proper functional languages. This is C++. – CashCow Apr 9 '15 at 10:49
  • 1
    @CashCow Agreed. However, since you asked: coliru.stacked-crooked.com/a/9020224d60d18169 – sehe Apr 9 '15 at 12:08
  • 3
    "Fancy fitting that into a transform_if algorithm?" That is a "transform_if algorithm", except it has everything hardcoded. – R. Martinho Fernandes Apr 9 '15 at 12:13
4

The standard is designed in such a way as to minimise duplication.

In this particular case you can achieve the algoritm's aims in a more readable and succinct way with a simple range-for loop.

// another way

vector<ha*> newVec;
for(auto& item : v) {
    if (item.i < 2) {
        newVec.push_back(&item);
    }
}

I have modified the example so that it compiles, added some diagnostics and presented both the OP's algorithm and mine side by side.

#include <vector>
#include <algorithm>
#include <iostream>
#include <iterator>

using namespace std;

struct ha { 
    explicit ha(int a) : i(a) {}
    int i;   // added this to solve compile error
};

// added diagnostic helpers
ostream& operator<<(ostream& os, const ha& t) {
    os << "{ " << t.i << " }";
    return os;
}

ostream& operator<<(ostream& os, const ha* t) {
    os << "&" << *t;
    return os;
}

int main() 
{
    vector<ha> v{ ha{1}, ha{7}, ha{1} }; // initial vector
    // GOAL : make a vector of pointers to elements with i < 2
    vector<ha*> ph; // target vector
    vector<ha*> pv; // temporary vector
    // 1. 
    transform(v.begin(), v.end(), back_inserter(pv), 
        [](ha &arg) { return &arg; }); 
    // 2. 
    copy_if(pv.begin(), pv.end(), back_inserter(ph),
        [](ha *parg) { return parg->i < 2;  }); // 2. 

    // output diagnostics
    copy(begin(v), end(v), ostream_iterator<ha>(cout));
    cout << endl;
    copy(begin(ph), end(ph), ostream_iterator<ha*>(cout));
    cout << endl;


    // another way

    vector<ha*> newVec;
    for(auto& item : v) {
        if (item.i < 2) {
            newVec.push_back(&item);
        }
    }

    // diagnostics
    copy(begin(newVec), end(newVec), ostream_iterator<ha*>(cout));
    cout << endl;
    return 0;
}
3

Sorry to resurrect this question after so long. I had a similar requirement recently. I solved it by writing a version of back_insert_iterator that takes a boost::optional:

template<class Container>
struct optional_back_insert_iterator
: public std::iterator< std::output_iterator_tag,
void, void, void, void >
{
    explicit optional_back_insert_iterator( Container& c )
    : container(std::addressof(c))
    {}

    using value_type = typename Container::value_type;

    optional_back_insert_iterator<Container>&
    operator=( const boost::optional<value_type> opt )
    {
        if (opt) {
            container->push_back(std::move(opt.value()));
        }
        return *this;
    }

    optional_back_insert_iterator<Container>&
    operator*() {
        return *this;
    }

    optional_back_insert_iterator<Container>&
    operator++() {
        return *this;
    }

    optional_back_insert_iterator<Container>&
    operator++(int) {
        return *this;
    }

protected:
    Container* container;
};

template<class Container>
optional_back_insert_iterator<Container> optional_back_inserter(Container& container)
{
    return optional_back_insert_iterator<Container>(container);
}

used like this:

transform(begin(s), end(s),
          optional_back_inserter(d),
          [](const auto& s) -> boost::optional<size_t> {
              if (s.length() > 1)
                  return { s.length() * 2 };
              else
                  return { boost::none };
          });
  • 1
    Not measured - until users complain that their experience is CPU-bound (i.e. never) I am more concerned with correctness than nanoseconds. However I can't see it being poor. Optionals are very cheap since there is no memory allocation and Ts constructor is only called if the optional is actually populated. I would expect the optimiser to eliminate almost all dead code since all code paths are visible at compile time. – Richard Hodges Dec 8 '15 at 0:48
  • Yeah. I'd agree if it weren't exactly about a general purpose algorithm (actually, generic building block inside those). This is the place where I'm not usually enthused unless something is as simple as it gets. Further, I'd love for the optional handling to be a decorator on any output iterator (so at least we get composability of output iterators, while we're trying to plug the lack of composability of algorithms). – sehe Dec 8 '15 at 1:00
  • There's logically no difference whether you handle the optional insert via a decorator on the iteratior or in the transform function. It's ultimately just a test of a flag. I think you'll find that the optimised code would be the same either way. The only thing standing in the way of full optimisation would be exception handling. Marking T as having noexcept constructors would cure this. – Richard Hodges Dec 8 '15 at 8:08
  • what form would you like the call to transform() to take? I'm sure we could build a composable iterator suite. – Richard Hodges Dec 8 '15 at 11:35
  • Me too :) I was commenting on your suggestion. I was not proposing something else (I had that long ago. Let's have ranges and composable algorithms instead :)) – sehe Dec 8 '15 at 13:33
2

After just finding this question again after some time, and devising a whole slew of potentially useful generic iterator adaptors I realized that the original question required NOTHING more than std::reference_wrapper.

Use it instead of a pointer, and you're good:

Live On Coliru

#include <algorithm>
#include <functional> // std::reference_wrapper
#include <iostream>
#include <vector>

struct ha {
    int i;
};

int main() {
    std::vector<ha> v { {1}, {7}, {1}, };

    std::vector<std::reference_wrapper<ha const> > ph; // target vector
    copy_if(v.begin(), v.end(), back_inserter(ph), [](const ha &parg) { return parg.i < 2; });

    for (ha const& el : ph)
        std::cout << el.i << " ";
}

Prints

1 1 
1

You may use copy_if along. Why not? Define OutputIt (see copy):

struct my_inserter: back_insert_iterator<vector<ha *>>
{
  my_inserter(vector<ha *> &dst)
    : back_insert_iterator<vector<ha *>>(back_inserter<vector<ha *>>(dst))
  {
  }
  my_inserter &operator *()
  {
    return *this;
  }
  my_inserter &operator =(ha &arg)
  {
    *static_cast< back_insert_iterator<vector<ha *>> &>(*this) = &arg;
    return *this;
  }
};

and rewrite your code:

int main() 
{
    vector<ha> v{ ha{1}, ha{7}, ha{1} }; // initial vector
    // GOAL : make a vector of pointers to elements with i < 2
    vector<ha*> ph; // target vector

    my_inserter yes(ph);
    copy_if(v.begin(), v.end(), yes,
        [](const ha &parg) { return parg.i < 2;  });

    return 0;
}
  • 2
    "Why not?" - Because code is for humans. To me the friction is actually worse than going back to writing function objects instead of lambdas. *static_cast< back_insert_iterator<vector<ha *>> &>(*this) = &arg; is both unreadable and needlessly concrete. See this c++17 take with more generic usages. – sehe Dec 9 '17 at 10:07
  • Here's a version doesn't hardcode the base-iterator (so you can use it with std::insert_iterator<> or std::ostream_iterator<> e.g.) and also let's you supply a transformation (e.g. as a lambda). c++17, Starting to look useful/Same in c++11 – sehe Dec 9 '17 at 10:39
  • Note, at this point, there is little reason to keep the base-iterators, and you can simply: use any function, noting that Boost contains a better implementation: boost::function_output_iterator. Now all that's left is re-inventing for_each_if :) – sehe Dec 9 '17 at 10:40
  • Actually, re-reading the original question, let's add a voice of reason - using just c++11 standard library. – sehe Dec 9 '17 at 11:04
0
template <class InputIt, class OutputIt, class BinaryOp>
OutputIt
transform_if(InputIt it, InputIt end, OutputIt oit, BinaryOp op)
{
    for(; it != end; ++it, (void) ++oit)
        op(oit, *it);
    return oit;
}

Usage: (Note that CONDITION and TRANSFORM are not macros, they are placeholders for whatever condition and transformation you want to apply)

std::vector a{1, 2, 3, 4};
std::vector b;

return transform_if(a.begin(), a.end(), b.begin(),
    [](auto oit, auto item)             // Note the use of 'auto' to make life easier
    {
        if(CONDITION(item))             // Here's the 'if' part
            *oit++ = TRANSFORM(item);   // Here's the 'transform' part
    }
);
  • would you rate this implementation production ready? Would it work well with non-copyable elements? Or move-iterators? – sehe Mar 22 '16 at 8:02
0

This is just an answer to question 1 "Is there a more elegant workaround with the available C++ standard library tools ?".

If you can use c++17 then you can use std::optional for a simpler solution using only C++ standard library functionality. The idea is to return std::nullopt in case there is no mapping:

See live on Coliru

#include <iostream>
#include <optional>
#include <vector>

template <
    class InputIterator, class OutputIterator, 
    class UnaryOperator
>
OutputIterator filter_transform(InputIterator first1, InputIterator last1,
                            OutputIterator result, UnaryOperator op)
{
    while (first1 != last1) 
    {
        if (auto mapped = op(*first1)) {
            *result = std::move(mapped.value());
            ++result;
        }
        ++first1;
    }
    return result;
}

struct ha { 
    int i;
    explicit ha(int a) : i(a) {}
};

int main()
{
    std::vector<ha> v{ ha{1}, ha{7}, ha{1} }; // initial vector

    // GOAL : make a vector of pointers to elements with i < 2
    std::vector<ha*> ph; // target vector
    filter_transform(v.begin(), v.end(), back_inserter(ph), 
        [](ha &arg) { return arg.i < 2 ? std::make_optional(&arg) : std::nullopt; });

    for (auto p : ph)
        std::cout << p->i << std::endl;

    return 0;
}

Note that I just implemented Rust's approach in C++ here.

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