31

What is the best way to determine whether or not a field's value is an integer in SQL Server (2000/2005/2008)?

IsNumeric returns true for a variety of formats that would not likely convert to an integer. Examples include '15,000' and '15.1'.

You can use a like statement but that only appears to work well for fields that have a pre-determined number of digits...

select * where zipcode like '[0-9][0-9][0-9][0-9][0-9]'

I could write a user defined function that attempts to convert a varchar parameter to an int within a try/catch block but I'm checking with the community to see if someone has come across any succient methods to achieve this goal - preferably one that can be used within the where clause of a SQL statement without creating other objects.

  • I wonder why IsInteger() is not available in SQL Server. – Ben Mar 1 '13 at 21:58

11 Answers 11

37

1 approach is

zipcode NOT LIKE '%[^0-9]%'

Double negatives, got to love 'em!

  • Definitely the type of thing I was looking for... although it misses '-1' and includes ''. That said, I like it. – Mayo Mar 1 '10 at 19:11
55

Late entry that handles negative

ISNUMERIC(zipcode + '.0e0') --integer
ISNUMERIC(zipcode + 'e0')  --decimal

For more see this

  • Wow, that is cryptic but fascinating that it works. Thanks for the additional info. :) – Mayo Mar 3 '10 at 14:49
  • So simple! Thank you! – Christian Jun 24 '10 at 18:11
  • 4
    I found that isnumeric(nullif(ltrim(rtrim(zipcode)), '') + '.0e0') more closely matches the output of a normal isnumeric with regard to spaces and empty strings. This may be desirable for some. – Tim Lehner Sep 17 '12 at 17:14
  • you rock, saved me a lot of time today – Jason Hughes Jul 23 '14 at 21:14
  • 2
    ISNUMERIC is a secret Microsoft joke. SELECT ISNUMERIC ('$'), ISNUMERIC ('-'), ISNUMERIC ('+'), ISNUMERIC ('.'), ISNUMERIC('\123') returns 1 (true) in all cases. It has no value back here in the real world. Don't use it ever. Every time you use it, it sends telemetry back to the MS Jokes Department. Last Friday of each month, the various SQL teams (ISNUMERIC, Unique NULLS, CSV imports etc etc) get together at an office party and see who got the highest Dummies score. – Reversed Engineer Sep 10 '18 at 12:52
6

If SQL Server 2005+, I'd enable CLR and create the function to support regexes. For SQL Server 2000, see this article for creating a UDF to do the same thing.

Then I'd use the regex: ^\d{5}$

  • +1 as your UDF/CLR method doesn't invoke try/catch. :) – Mayo Mar 1 '10 at 19:17
  • 1
    I'd use LIKE or .0e0. You may not be able to enable CLR – gbn Mar 3 '10 at 18:36
4

This expression gives 1 for an integer value and 0 otherwise

floor((floor(abs(zipcode)))/abs(zipcode))
1

Why not just use the following? I can't see to find any cases where it fails.

  • 1 = integer
  • 0 = not integer
  • null = non-numeric
DECLARE @TestValue nvarchar(MAX)
SET @TestValue = '1.04343234e5'

SELECT CASE WHEN ISNUMERIC(@TestValue) = 1
        THEN CASE WHEN ROUND(@TestValue,0,1) = @TestValue
            THEN 1
            ELSE 0
            END
        ELSE null
        END AS Analysis
  • 196123E1 returns 1 – Jeff Reddy Jul 15 '14 at 18:33
  • As well it should since 196123E1 = 196123 x 10^1 = 1961230 = ROUND(1961230); which are all integers. – cjbarth Jul 16 '14 at 13:37
  • A reasonable standard for a proper numeric check should be if a select convert(int, @string_int) succeeds when the method returns 1. This method would fail with: Conversion failed when converting the varchar value '196123E1' to data type int.. The +'.0e0' method is better. – mattmc3 Oct 11 '16 at 16:39
0

I came up with the perfect answer for this on another StackO question.
It also proves you cannot use ".0e0" like one user suggests here.
It does so without CLR or non-scalar functions.
Please check it out: https://stackoverflow.com/a/10645764/555798

0

After moving to sql 2008, I was struggling with isnumeric('\8') returning true but throwing an error when casting to an integer. Apparently forward slash is valid currency for yen or won - (reference http://www.louiebao.net/blog/200910/isnumeric/)

My solution was

case when ISNUMERIC(@str) > 0 and not rtrim(@str) LIKE '[^0-9]%'  and not rtrim(@str) LIKE '%[^0-9]' and not rtrim(@str) LIKE '[^0-9]%' then rtrim(@str) else null end
0

See whether the below code will help. In the below values only 9, 2147483647, 1234567 are eligible as Integer. We can create this as function and can use this.

CREATE TABLE MY_TABLE(MY_FIELD VARCHAR(50))
INSERT INTO MY_TABLE
VALUES('9.123'),('1234567'),('9'),('2147483647'),('2147483647.01'),('2147483648'), ('2147483648ABCD'),('214,7483,648')

SELECT *
FROM MY_TABLE
WHERE CHARINDEX('.',MY_FIELD) = 0 AND CHARINDEX(',',MY_FIELD) = 0       
AND ISNUMERIC(MY_FIELD) = 1 AND CONVERT(FLOAT,MY_FIELD) / 2147483647 <= 1
DROP TABLE MY_TABLE
0

I did it using a Case statement: Cast(Case When Quantity/[# of Days]= Cast(Quantity/[# of Days] as int) Then abs(Quantity/[# of Days]) Else 0 End as int)

0

To test whether the input value is an integer or not we can use SQL_VARIANT_PROPERTY function of SQL SERVER.

The following SQL Script will take input and test it whether the data type turns out to be integer or not

declare @convertedTempValue bigint, @inputValue nvarchar(255) = '1' --Change '1' to any input value
set @convertedTempValue = TRY_PARSE(@inputValue as bigint) --we trying to convert to bigint
declare @var3 nvarchar(255) = cast (SQL_VARIANT_PROPERTY(@convertedTempValue,'BaseType') as nvarchar(255)) --we using SQL_VARIANT_PROPERTY to find out datatype
if ( @var3 like '%int%')
    begin
    print 'value is integer'
    end
else
    begin
    print 'value is non integer'
    end
go
-2

Maybe you should only store integer data in integer datatypes.

  • 3
    I think it's safe to assume that this is part of some ETL process and that's where he's try to get or this isn't really an option. This should really be a comment on the question, not an answer. – Booji Boy Sep 18 '14 at 14:34

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