1

I observed this skipping rows for this type of expression quite a few times and always wondered whether this is a bug or if it makes sense - at least technically. The purpose of the queries is to generate sequential table content. Mostly DATEs or DATETIMEs.

t is just any table with at least 30 rows.

This version produces the result as intended:

set @date = "2012-01-01";

select
    @date := date_add(@date, interval 1 day) as d
from t
#having d < "2012-01-31"
limit 30
;

output:

'2012-01-02'
'2012-01-03'
'2012-01-04'
...
'2012-01-31'

now including the HAVING condition (so I don't have to use a number to limit how many rows I want to generate, but can simply specify an upper boudary):

set @date = "2012-01-01";

select
    @date := date_add(@date, interval 1 day) as d
from t
having d < "2012-01-31"
limit 30
;

output:

'2012-01-03'
'2012-01-05'
'2012-01-07'
...
'2012-01-29'
'2012-01-31'

But please mind - this is a WHY-question - not a HOW-question.

4
  • It doesn't make sense to use HAVING without an aggregate function, nor does it make sense to use LIMIT without an ORDER BY clause. Sets are by definition unordered and you do not know what order will be returned. May 10, 2014 at 18:30
  • with all due respect, sir, but you are wrong. try to understand the purpose of the queries and then you understand why I use limit and having while not using aggregate functions or grouping.
    – Raffael
    May 10, 2014 at 19:01
  • While it is syntaxically correct, it is the source of your error. I'll post an answer explaining why. May 10, 2014 at 19:09
  • Oh that would be splendid!
    – Raffael
    May 10, 2014 at 19:11

1 Answer 1

2

The problem is that when you call the column d in your HAVING clause, it computes the expression @date := date_add(@date, interval 1 day) again. This means that interval 1 day is added twice to the initial @date variable, thus why you have gaps in your entries. You can verify this fact by adding an extra condition, for instance HAVING d < '2012-01-31' AND d > '2012-01-01'.

The correct query would be as follow :

SET @date = '2012-01-01';
SELECT @date := date_add(@date, interval 1 day) as d
FROM t
WHERE date_add(@date, interval 1 day) < '2012-01-31'
ORDER BY d
LIMIT 30;

Note that a HAVING clause should be used with aggregate functions, and that using LIMIT without an ORDER BY clause might give you results in an incorrect order.

1
  • +1 good explanation at first glance i have missed the fact for the having clause that it will again compute the expression May 10, 2014 at 19:18

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