276

I have a date with the format Sun May 11,2014. How can I convert it to 2014-05-11 using JavaScript?

function taskDate(dateMilli) {
    var d = (new Date(dateMilli) + '').split(' ');
    d[2] = d[2] + ',';

    return [d[0], d[1], d[2], d[3]].join(' ');
}

var datemilli = Date.parse('Sun May 11,2014');
taskdate(datemilli);

The code above gives me the same date format, sun may 11,2014. How can I fix this?

32 Answers 32

385

You can do:

function formatDate(date) {
    var d = new Date(date),
        month = '' + (d.getMonth() + 1),
        day = '' + d.getDate(),
        year = d.getFullYear();

    if (month.length < 2) 
        month = '0' + month;
    if (day.length < 2) 
        day = '0' + day;

    return [year, month, day].join('-');
}

Usage example:

alert(formatDate('Sun May 11,2014'));

Output:

2014-05-11

Demo on JSFiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/abdulrauf6182012/2Frm3/

  • 5
    Really multiple variable declarations in the same statement? stackoverflow.com/questions/694102/… – bhspencer Aug 29 '15 at 15:00
  • 6
    @Fuser97381 Multiple variable declarations in the same statement is more than just an aesthetic style preference. It is a dangerous practice. If you inadvertently fail add a comma after each declaration you end up creating global variables. Not something that should be encouraged on what may become the canonical answer to a question. – bhspencer Aug 31 '15 at 12:13
  • 6
    'use strict'; @bhspencer – Vix Oct 20 '15 at 14:11
  • 1
    Reformatting a date string should not depend on successful parsing of non-standard strings by the built-in parser. Given the OP format, it can be reformatted in less code without using a Date at all. – RobG Jun 16 '17 at 12:12
  • How to increment more 30 days in range 1~31? – Thiago Diniz Feb 22 at 16:19
321

Just leverage the built-in toISOString method that brings your date to the ISO 8601 format:

yourDate.toISOString().split('T')[0]

Where yourDate is your date object.

  • 3
    This doesn't work with Internet Explorer <= 8 – Kevin Borders Aug 16 '15 at 19:57
  • 174
    BE CAREFUL with this method as it first converts to the date to UTC. If you are in a + timezone and your time portion is early in the day, then it could roll-back a day. Alternatively, if you're in a - timezone and your time portion is late in the day, then it could roll forward a day. – Luke Baulch Sep 13 '15 at 2:47
  • 2
    Try this instead: new Date(yourDateStr).toISOString().split('T')[0] – exbuddha Feb 12 '16 at 19:42
  • 3
    exbuddha, doesn't solve the isue of @LukeBaulch – gabn88 May 9 '16 at 8:33
  • 13
    const offset = yourDate.getTimezoneOffset(); yourDate = new Date(yourDate.getTime() + (offset*60*1000)); yourDate.toISOString().split('T')[0] this should solve the issue of timezone – mjwrazor Feb 14 '18 at 17:11
94

I use this way to get the date in format yyyy-mm-dd :)

var todayDate = new Date().toISOString().slice(0,10);
  • 12
    How do you handle the date switching by a day as mentioned here by @Luke_Baulch? – Malvineous Sep 10 '16 at 13:45
  • 4
    You can do this: var todayDate = new Date(); todayDate.setMinutes(todayDate.getMinutes() - todayDate.getTimezoneOffset()); todayDate.toISOString().slice(0,10); This should help avoid the UTC problem. – Fernando Aguilar Sep 12 '16 at 15:44
  • 1
    @FernandoAguilar One doubt though, how do we know we need to subtract the offset or add it? – whyAto8 Apr 12 '17 at 10:40
  • var todayDate = new Date(2018, 3 - 1, 26); todayDate.toISOString().slice(0, 10); gives me "2018-03-25". On another system var todayDate = new Date(2018, 3 - 1, 26, 17, 0, 0); todayDate.toISOString().slice(0, 10); gives me "2018-03-27". – Salman A Mar 26 '18 at 18:22
  • Doesn't always work. It sometimes subtracts a day due to UTC conversion. – NickG May 22 at 11:55
77

The simplest way to convert your date to the yyyy-mm-dd format, is to do this:

var date = new Date("Sun May 11,2014");
var dateString = new Date(date.getTime() - (date.getTimezoneOffset() * 60000 ))
                    .toISOString()
                    .split("T")[0];

How it works:

  • new Date("Sun May 11,2014") converts the string "Sun May 11,2014" to a date object that represents the time Sun May 11 2014 00:00:00 in a timezone based on current locale (host system settings)
  • new Date(date.getTime() - (date.getTimezoneOffset() * 60000 )) converts your date to a date object that corresponds with the time Sun May 11 2014 00:00:00 in UTC (standard time) by subtracting the time zone offset
  • .toISOString() converts the date object to an ISO 8601 string 2014-05-11T00:00:00.000Z
  • .split("T") splits the string to array ["2014-05-11", "00:00:00.000Z"]
  • [0] takes the first element of that array

Demo

var date = new Date("Sun May 11,2014");
var dateString = new Date(date.getTime() - (date.getTimezoneOffset() * 60000 ))
                    .toISOString()
                    .split("T")[0];

console.log(dateString);

  • 3
    This should be the accepted answer. – Morfinismo May 1 at 14:30
  • 7
    No one else is aghast that this is the simplest way?? – gap Aug 27 at 17:29
30
format = function date2str(x, y) {
    var z = {
        M: x.getMonth() + 1,
        d: x.getDate(),
        h: x.getHours(),
        m: x.getMinutes(),
        s: x.getSeconds()
    };
    y = y.replace(/(M+|d+|h+|m+|s+)/g, function(v) {
        return ((v.length > 1 ? "0" : "") + eval('z.' + v.slice(-1))).slice(-2)
    });

    return y.replace(/(y+)/g, function(v) {
        return x.getFullYear().toString().slice(-v.length)
    });
}

Result:

format(new Date('Sun May 11,2014'), 'yyyy-MM-dd')
"2014-05-11
  • 1
    I like the additional flexibility that this solution gives over the other answers to this question. I haven't thoroughly tested this, but for the format I desired (i.e. "yyyy-MM-dd hh:mm:ss"), it works just as expected. – porcus Mar 20 '15 at 2:37
  • 1
    You could eaaaaaaaasily avoid eval. – Salman A Mar 27 '18 at 7:59
  • 1
    here's a version which avoids the eval and comments better jsfiddle.net/8904cmLd/2 – m1m1k Apr 5 '18 at 11:53
  • I benefited from this response. I did replace that line with the eval statement to return ((v.length > 1 ? "0" : "") + z[v.slice(-1)]).slice(-2); – JesusIsMyDriver.dll Oct 10 '18 at 20:36
16

A combination of some of the answers:

var d = new Date(date);
date = [
  d.getFullYear(),
  ('0' + (d.getMonth() + 1)).slice(-2),
  ('0' + d.getDate()).slice(-2)
].join('-');
  • I like the solution the best - easy to read, and does not rely on toISOString() and the potential timezone pitfalls with using that function. – matt.f.c May 12 at 16:59
9

If you don't have anything against using libraries, you could just use the Moments.js library like so:

var now = new Date();
var dateString = moment(now).format('YYYY-MM-DD');

var dateStringWithTime = moment(now).format('YYYY-MM-DD HH:mm:ss');
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/moment.js/2.18.1/moment.min.js"></script>

8

Simply use this:

var date = new Date('1970-01-01'); // Or your date here
console.log((date.getMonth() + 1) + '/' + date.getDate() + '/' +  date.getFullYear());

Simple and sweet ;)

  • 4
    padding is not there for 2 letter format. it'll show single digit if date or month is less than 10 that's why can't use this directly. – Yatender Singh Mar 21 '17 at 3:15
  • yess but that can be achived simply using javascript, its totaly upto your requirement i think so , isn't it ? @YatenderSingh – Pardeep Jain Mar 21 '17 at 5:13
  • 4
    yeah correct but check the title of question "yyyy-mm-dd" format he wants :) – Yatender Singh Mar 21 '17 at 11:20
8

toISOString() assumes your date is local time and converts it to UTC. You will get an incorrect date string.

The following method should return what you need.

Date.prototype.yyyymmdd = function() {         

    var yyyy = this.getFullYear().toString();                                    
    var mm = (this.getMonth()+1).toString(); // getMonth() is zero-based         
    var dd  = this.getDate().toString();             

    return yyyy + '-' + (mm[1]?mm:"0"+mm[0]) + '-' + (dd[1]?dd:"0"+dd[0]);
};

Source: https://blog.justin.kelly.org.au/simple-javascript-function-to-format-the-date-as-yyyy-mm-dd/

4

I suggest using something like formatDate-js instead of trying to replicate it every time. Just use a library that supports all the major strftime actions.

new Date().format("%Y-%m-%d")
4

You can try this: https://www.npmjs.com/package/timesolver

npm i timesolver

Use it in your code:

const timeSolver = require('timeSolver');
const date = new Date();
const dateString = timeSolver.getString(date, "YYYY-MM-DD");

You can get the date string by using this method:

getString
3

None of these answers quite satisfied me. I wanted a cross-platform solution that gave me the day in the local timezone without using any external libraries.

This is what I came up with:

function localDay(time) {
  var minutesOffset = time.getTimezoneOffset()
  var millisecondsOffset = minutesOffset*60*1000
  var local = new Date(time - millisecondsOffset)
  return local.toISOString().substr(0, 10)
}

That should return the day of the date, in YYYY-MM-DD format, in the timezone the date references.

So for example, localDay(new Date("2017-08-24T03:29:22.099Z")) will return "2017-08-23" even though it's already the 24th at UTC.

You'll need to polyfill Date.prototype.toISOString for it to work in Internet Explorer 8, but it should be supported everywhere else.

  • Maybe worth noting that it will only give you 2017-08-23 if you're sufficiently behind UTC (e.g. in the US). – Simon D Sep 18 '17 at 8:40
3

Retrieve year, month, and day, and then put them together. Straight, simple, and accurate.

function formatDate(date) {
    var year = date.getFullYear().toString();
    var month = (date.getMonth() + 101).toString().substring(1);
    var day = (date.getDate() + 100).toString().substring(1);
    return year + "-" + month + "-" + day;
}

alert(formatDate(new Date()));

2

To consider the timezone also, this one-liner should be good without any library:

new Date().toLocaleString("en-IN", {timeZone: "Asia/Kolkata"}).split(',')[0]
1

function myYmd(D){
    var pad = function(num) {
        var s = '0' + num;
        return s.substr(s.length - 2);
    }
    var Result = D.getFullYear() + '-' + pad((D.getMonth() + 1)) + '-' + pad(D.getDate());
    return Result;
}

var datemilli = new Date('Sun May 11,2014');
document.write(myYmd(datemilli));

1

Date.js is great for this.

require("datejs")
(new Date()).toString("yyyy-MM-dd")
1

var d = new Date("Sun May 1,2014");

var year  = d.getFullYear();
var month = d.getMonth() + 1;
var day   = d.getDate(); 

month = checkZero(month);             
day   = checkZero(day);

var date = "";

date += year;
date += "-";
date += month;
date += "-";
date += day;

document.querySelector("#display").innerHTML = date;
    
function checkZero(i) 
{
    if (i < 10) 
    {
        i = "0" + i
    };  // add zero in front of numbers < 10

    return i;
}
<div id="display"></div>

1
new Date(new Date(YOUR_DATE.toISOString()).getTime() - 
                 (YOUR_DATE.getTimezoneOffset() * 60 * 1000)).toISOString().substr(0, 10)
1

A few of the previous answer were OK, but they weren't very flexible. I wanted something that could really handle more edge cases, so I took @orangleliu 's answer and expanded on it. https://jsfiddle.net/8904cmLd/1/

function DateToString(inDate, formatString) {
    // Written by m1m1k 2018-04-05

    // Validate that we're working with a date
    if(!isValidDate(inDate))
    {
        inDate = new Date(inDate);
    }

    // See the jsFiddle for extra code to be able to use DateToString('Sun May 11,2014', 'USA');
    //formatString = CountryCodeToDateFormat(formatString);

    var dateObject = {
        M: inDate.getMonth() + 1,
        d: inDate.getDate(),
        D: inDate.getDate(),
        h: inDate.getHours(),
        m: inDate.getMinutes(),
        s: inDate.getSeconds(),
        y: inDate.getFullYear(),
        Y: inDate.getFullYear()
    };

    // Build Regex Dynamically based on the list above.
    // It should end up with something like this: "/([Yy]+|M+|[Dd]+|h+|m+|s+)/g"
    var dateMatchRegex = joinObj(dateObject, "+|") + "+";
    var regEx = new RegExp(dateMatchRegex,"g");
    formatString = formatString.replace(regEx, function(formatToken) {
        var datePartValue = dateObject[formatToken.slice(-1)];
        var tokenLength = formatToken.length;

        // A conflict exists between specifying 'd' for no zero pad -> expand
        // to '10' and specifying yy for just two year digits '01' instead
        // of '2001'.  One expands, the other contracts.
        //
        // So Constrict Years but Expand All Else
        if (formatToken.indexOf('y') < 0 && formatToken.indexOf('Y') < 0)
        {
            // Expand single digit format token 'd' to
            // multi digit value '10' when needed
            var tokenLength = Math.max(formatToken.length, datePartValue.toString().length);
        }
        var zeroPad = (datePartValue.toString().length < formatToken.length ? "0".repeat(tokenLength) : "");
        return (zeroPad + datePartValue).slice(-tokenLength);
    });

    return formatString;
}

Example usage:

DateToString('Sun May 11,2014', 'MM/DD/yy');
DateToString('Sun May 11,2014', 'yyyy.MM.dd');
DateToString(new Date('Sun Dec 11,2014'),'yy-M-d');
  • Nice clean & commented solution. Yet I'm skeptical about the first argument, which is silently replaced by a fresh new date if not recognized as a valid date. I'd rather put this "optionnal default value" as 2nd argument instead, and return some kind of exception (could be a simple "Invalid date format" returned string) in case the format isn't recognized, so that error appear clearly to the tester/user – Balmipour Oct 16 at 10:04
1

This worked for me to get the current date in the desired format (YYYYMMDD HH:MM:SS):

var d = new Date();

var date1 = d.getFullYear() + '' +
            ((d.getMonth()+1) < 10 ? "0" + (d.getMonth() + 1) : (d.getMonth() + 1)) +
            '' +
            (d.getDate() < 10 ? "0" + d.getDate() : d.getDate());

var time1 = (d.getHours() < 10 ? "0" + d.getHours() : d.getHours()) +
            ':' +
            (d.getMinutes() < 10 ? "0" + d.getMinutes() : d.getMinutes()) +
            ':' +
            (d.getSeconds() < 10 ? "0" + d.getSeconds() : d.getSeconds());

print(date1+' '+time1);
1

No library is needed

Just pure JavaScript.

The example below gets the last two months from today:

var d = new Date()
d.setMonth(d.getMonth() - 2);
var dateString = new Date(d);
console.log('Before Format', dateString, 'After format', dateString.toISOString().slice(0,10))

  • Dangerous. In that case you ignore the timezone offset. – maxence51 Apr 18 at 8:40
1

PHP compatible date format

Here is a small function which can take the same parameters as the PHP function date() and return a date/time string in JavaScript.

Note that not all date() format options from PHP are supported. You can extend the parts object to create the missing format-token

/**
 * Date formatter with PHP "date()"-compatible format syntax.
 */
const formatDate = (format, date) => {
  if (!format) { format = 'Y-m-d' }
  if (!date) { date = new Date() }

  const parts = {
    Y: date.getFullYear().toString(),
    y: ('00' + (date.getYear() - 100)).toString().slice(-2),
    m: ('0' + (date.getMonth() + 1)).toString().slice(-2),
    n: (date.getMonth() + 1).toString(),
    d: ('0' + date.getDate()).toString().slice(-2),
    j: date.getDate().toString(),
    H: ('0' + date.getHours()).toString().slice(-2),
    G: date.getHours().toString(),
    i: ('0' + date.getMinutes()).toString().slice(-2),
    s: ('0' + date.getSeconds()).toString().slice(-2)
  }

  const modifiers = Object.keys(parts).join('')
  const reDate = new RegExp('(?<!\\\\)[' + modifiers + ']', 'g')
  const reEscape = new RegExp('\\\\([' + modifiers + '])', 'g')

  return format
    .replace(reDate, $0 => parts[$0])
    .replace(reEscape, ($0, $1) => $1)
}

// ----- EXAMPLES -----
console.log( formatDate() ); // "2019-05-21"
console.log( formatDate('H:i:s') ); // "16:21:32"
console.log( formatDate('Y-m-d, o\\n H:i:s') ); // "2019-05-21, on 16:21:32"
console.log( formatDate('Y-m-d', new Date(2000000000000)) ); // "2033-05-18"

Gist

Here is a gist with an updated version of the formatDate() function and additional examples: https://gist.github.com/stracker-phil/c7b68ea0b1d5bbb97af0a6a3dc66e0d9

1

Reformatting a date string is fairly straightforward, e.g.

var s = 'Sun May 11,2014';

function reformatDate(s) {
  function z(n){return ('0' + n).slice(-2)}
  var months = [,'jan','feb','mar','apr','may','jun',
                 'jul','aug','sep','oct','nov','dec'];
  var b = s.split(/\W+/);
  return b[3] + '-' +
    z(months.indexOf(b[1].substr(0,3).toLowerCase())) + '-' +
    z(b[2]);
}

console.log(reformatDate(s));

0

Here is one way to do it:

var date = Date.parse('Sun May 11,2014');

function format(date) {
  date = new Date(date);

  var day = ('0' + date.getDate()).slice(-2);
  var month = ('0' + (date.getMonth() + 1)).slice(-2);
  var year = date.getFullYear();

  return year + '-' + month + '-' + day;
}

console.log(format(date));
0

Yet another combination of the answers. Nicely readable, but a little lengthy.

function getCurrentDayTimestamp() {
  const d = new Date();

  return new Date(
    Date.UTC(
      d.getFullYear(),
      d.getMonth(),
      d.getDate(),
      d.getHours(),
      d.getMinutes(),
      d.getSeconds()
    )
  // `toIsoString` returns something like "2017-08-22T08:32:32.847Z"
  // and we want the first part ("2017-08-22")
  ).toISOString().slice(0, 10);
}
0

If the date needs to be the same across all time zones, for example represents some value from the database, then be sure to use UTC versions of the day, month, fullyear functions on the JavaScript date object as this will display in UTC time and avoid off-by-one errors in certain time zones.

Even better, use the Moment.js date library for this sort of formatting.

0

I modified Samit Satpute's response as follows:

var newstartDate = new Date();
// newstartDate.setDate(newstartDate.getDate() - 1);
var startDate = newstartDate.toISOString().replace(/[-T:\.Z]/g, ""); //.slice(0, 10); // To get the Yesterday's Date in YYYY MM DD Format
console.log(startDate);

0

Format and finding maximum and minimum date from hashmap data:

var obj = {"a":'2001-15-01', "b": '2001-12-02' , "c": '2001-1-03'};

function findMaxMinDate(obj){
  let formatEncode = (id)=> { let s = id.split('-'); return `${s[0]+'-'+s[2]+'-'+s[1]}`}
  let formatDecode = (id)=> { let s = id.split('/'); return `${s[2]+'-'+s[0]+'-'+s[1]}`}
  let arr = Object.keys( obj ).map(( key )=> { return new Date(formatEncode(obj[key])); });
  let min = new Date(Math.min.apply(null, arr)).toLocaleDateString();
  let max = new Date(Math.max.apply(null, arr)).toLocaleDateString();
  return {maxd: `${formatDecode(max)}`, mind:`${formatDecode(min)}`}
}

console.log(findMaxMinDate(obj));

  • How is this related to the question (formatting a date)? – Peter Mortensen Sep 7 at 13:10
-2

All given answers are great and helped me big. In my situation, I wanted to get the current date in yyyy mm dd format along with date-1. Here is what worked for me.

var endDate = new Date().toISOString().slice(0, 10); // To get the Current Date in YYYY MM DD Format

var newstartDate = new Date();
newstartDate.setDate(newstartDate.getDate() - 1);
var startDate = newstartDate.toISOString().slice(0, 10); // To get the Yesterday's Date in YYYY MM DD Format
alert(startDate);
-3

It is easily accomplished by my date-shortcode package:

const dateShortcode = require('date-shortcode')
dateShortcode.parse('{YYYY-MM-DD}', 'Sun May 11,2014')
//=> '2014-05-11'
  • I really don't get the downvotes. This is definitely a way to accomplish what OP was asking. – Kodie Grantham Aug 26 at 14:05

protected by acdcjunior Feb 14 '18 at 21:27

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