1

Suppose I call Print very often in my code.

Do I have to declare CurrentPosition as global or local variable?

I want to know which version is faster.

Option A:

    int CurrentPosition = 0;
    void Print(string key, int conc, int col, byte _color) {
        if (col <= cMax ? col >= cMin : false) {
            if (CurrentRows.TryGetValue(key + "#" + conc.ToString(), out CurrentPosition)) { //Row is in the vieport
                grid.GetCell(CurrentPosition, col).Presenter.Background = new SolidColorBrush(Color.FromRgb(255, 255, 0));
            }
        }
    }

Option B:

    void Print(string key, int conc, int col, byte _color) {
    int CurrentPosition = 0;
        if (col <= cMax ? col >= cMin : false) {
            if (CurrentRows.TryGetValue(key + "#" + conc.ToString(), out CurrentPosition)) { //Row is in the vieport
                grid.GetCell(CurrentPosition, col).Presenter.Background = new SolidColorBrush(Color.FromRgb(255, 255, 0));
            }
        }
    }
  • Why do you use col <= cMax ? col >= cMin : false instead of col <= cMax && col >= cMin? The && will short-circuit. – Jeppe Stig Nielsen May 11 '14 at 21:07
  • Why do you assign =0 to the variable if it is passed as an out parameter? That 0 will be overwritten. – Jeppe Stig Nielsen May 11 '14 at 21:09
  • I think this is a small detail here. Anyway, the default value of the int type is zero. This is redundant in all cases, even without the out parameter. – ZenLulz May 11 '14 at 21:11
1

I propose to have a look under the hood to know how the C# compiler deals with these two options.

Let's say I have this simplistic class:

class Test
{
    private int _currentPosition;

    public int OptionA()
    {
        ImplOutParameter(out _currentPosition);
        return _currentPosition;
    }

    public int OptionB()
    {
        int currentPosition;
        ImplOutParameter(out currentPosition);

        return currentPosition;
    }

    public void ImplOutParameter(out int position)
    {
        position = 1;
    }
}

The two first methods are very similar to yours. The third one is here to test the out parameter implementation.

Let's compile this class in Release configuration. Using your favorite IL viewer, the method OptionA looks like:

Method OptionA

It pushes the reference of the object on the stack twice to get the variable member reference and to call the ImplOutParameter method. Then it returns the value of the variable member.

The method OptionB looks like:

Method OptionB

It pushes the reference of the object on the stack, pushes the address of the variable on the stack and call the ImplOutParameter method.Then it returns the value. It doesn't need to take time in order to allocate the variable.

Based on this analysis, I tend to say the OptionB implementation is a bit faster than the first one, but hey, this is very small. :)

  • (This comment goes beyond what the question asked.) At the same time, Option A is quite confusing to read because a variable that is only ever used locally inside one method is "promoted" to a class-level field. It also means that every instance of Test that resides in memory, will hold the field, even when the method is not called. – Jeppe Stig Nielsen May 11 '14 at 21:26
  • @JeppeStigNielsen Yes you are right, this is a bit strange to read. Despite this, I assume this is the case of the OP. Of course, the OptionA is not a memory-saving optimized approach, but it was interesting to see if this approach was faster than the second one. :) – ZenLulz May 11 '14 at 21:35
1

If you're maintaining the state of CurrentPosition between calls and you're not passing the value into the method, then it needs to be outside. Otherwise, it starts fresh every time.

The best policy would be a third option of passing CurrentPosition into the method as a parameter, however, and maintain the state independent of the routine's code.

In terms of speed, allocation does take a small amount of time, but it's generally negligible. The "stack frame" will be lengthened regardless, and assigning a default value takes about as long as an assignment.

So, the most you'll save is a couple of cycles per call (i.e., nanonseconds), but yes, declaring it outside is going to be a hair faster.

  • I'am not maintaining the state of CurrentPosition. I want to know which version is faster. – user72708 May 11 '14 at 15:57
  • Ah. In that case, there may be a tiny (but only tiny) edge to declaring outside. Will update answer. – John C May 11 '14 at 16:09
0

If you want to know which is faster, test it. That's the only way to really be sure.

Always test performance if you're making a decision on what method to choose based on it. If it isn't worth testing, then you don't need the extra cycles.

That being said, the two methods are [i]functionally[/i] different, so your decision shouldn't be based on their speed. Option B sets CurrentPosition each time Print is called, whereas Option A sets CurrentPosition to 0 once and its value when Print is called is [i]not guaranteed to be 0[/i] so you should choose whichever option provides the correct function.

I can tell you that the speed different will likely be negligible, practically non-existent between the two.

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