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I have written some code to calculate the RSA cryptographic algorithm. The program uses classes and inheritance because I want to calculate a public and private key for multiple users. There is a parent class rsa and child classes public_key and private_key.

When compiling the code below, I get many errors. All of them are about the derived classes not having the available fields in their respective constructors (see error message below code). However, these variables are defined with the protected access modifier in the parent class, so they should be accessible to the child class.

One side note: I had the function key in both of the child classes, but I thought it would be better to put it once in the parent class, is this right?

Here is the code:

#include <iostream>
#include <math.h>

using namespace std;

class rsa
{
protected:
    int p, q, d, m, n, f, e, c, end, k;

public:
    rsa() : n(0), e(0), c(0), k(0), end(0), f(0)
    { }

    void set(int , int , int, int);

    int key()
    {
        n = p * q;
        f = (p - 1) * (q - 1);

        for (k; end < 1; k++)
        {
            if ((1 + k * f) % d == 0) 
            {
                end = 2;
                e = (1 + k * f) / d;
            }
        }

        c = int(pow(m, e)) % n;

        return c;
    }
};

void rsa::set(int p_, int q_, int d_, int m_)
{
    p = p_;
    q = q_;
    d = d_;
    m = m_;
}

class public_key : public rsa
{
public:
    public_key() : n(0), e(0), c(0), k(0), end(0), f(0)
    { }
};

class private_key : public rsa
{
public:
    private_key() : n(0), e(0), c(0), k(0), end(0), f(0)
    { }
};

int main()
{
    public_key usr1, usr2;
    private_key usr1r, usr2r;

    usr1.set(11, 5, 23, 9);
    usr2.set(13, 7, 97, 6);
    usr1r.set(17, 7, 51, 8);
    usr2r.set(11, 17, 51, 4);

    cout << "Public key of user 1: " << usr1.key() << endl;
    cout << "Public key o user 2: " << usr2.key() << endl;

    cin.get();

    return 0;
}

One of the errors:

error: class ‘private_key’ does not have any field named ‘e’
   private_key () : n(0), e(0), c(0), k(0), end(0), f(0) {} ;

All the other errors are the same but the field name changes.

  • 2
    Please post the exact error and location. – chris May 11 '14 at 21:41
  • 4
    People would rather see the actual error message rather than being told your interpretation of the error message. – Richard Chambers May 11 '14 at 21:42
  • You cannot initialize the members of a base class like that. – Captain Obvlious May 11 '14 at 21:44
  • I have edited the question, one error is included. Do I have to put all the errors? – Mohamed Ahmed May 11 '14 at 21:44
  • @CaptainObvlious What is wrong with the initialization? It was compiling with no errors but that was when the function key was in both derived classes. – Mohamed Ahmed May 11 '14 at 21:46
5

The error has nothing to do with the access level of the members of class rsa. Even if you declare those members public you will still get the error. The problem is that a derived class's initialization list is run solely in the context of itself, you do not have access to base class members.

You can however access base class members (that are public or protected) in the body of a derived class constructor. Ex:

class public_key : public rsa
{
public:
    public_key()
    {
        n = 0;
        e = 0;
        c = 0;
        k = 0;
        end = 0;
        f = 0;
    }
};

class private_key : public rsa
{
public:
    private_key()
    {
        n = 0;
        e = 0;
        c = 0;
        k = 0;
        end = 0;
        f = 0;
    }
};

Though the above code uses assignment instead of initialization, it does the exact same thing under the hood for primitive types, which all of those members are.

Still, though the above code works, it is the wrong way of doing what you want. You have already written a constructor for class rsa, so one way to avoid duplicating code is to call your existing constructor from the initialization list.

class public_key : public rsa
{
public:
    public_key() : rsa()
    { }
};

class private_key : public rsa
{
public:
    private_key() : rsa()
    { }
};

However note that rsa() is the default constructor (since it has no parameters) so it will automatically be called by any constructor of the derived class (unless you specify some other rsa constructor in the initialization list).

class public_key : public rsa
{
public:
    public_key()
    { } // rsa() will be called automatically
};

class private_key : public rsa
{
public:
    private_key()
    { } // rsa() will be called automatically
};

But now that your derived class's have empty default constructors, you do not even need them (unless you plan to add more logic).

class public_key : public rsa
{
public:
    // rsa() will still be called automatically when declaring an instance of public_key
};

class private_key : public rsa
{
public:
    // rsa() will still be called automatically when declaring an instance of private_key 
};

As to your side note on the key() function, if the implementation of key() was the same in both child classes then yes, you only need it once in the parent class. You should always avoid code duplication so even if a small part of key() needed to be customized for each child class, you are better off writing a virtual function in the base class that key() can call as part of the calculation. Then, in each child class, override the virtual function with whatever specialization is necessary. Thus all the shared code can remain in the parent class key() function.

  • Ok, I didn't know that I can call the constructor in the initialization list. – Mohamed Ahmed May 11 '14 at 21:48
  • Many thanks to you. – Mohamed Ahmed May 11 '14 at 22:07
4

According to the C++ Standard (12.6.2 Initializing bases and members, paragraph #2)

Unless the mem-initializer-id names the constructor’s class, a non-static data member of the constructor’s class, or a direct or virtual base of that class, the mem-initializer is ill-formed.

So mem-initializers of the derived classes in your program are ill-formed and the compiler issues an error.

It is the base class constructor that should initialize its data members.

There is no any sense to define the constructor of class for example public_key the following way as

public_key () : n(0), e(0), c(0), k(0), end(0), f(0) {} ;

because at first the constructor of the base class will be called

rsa () : n(0), e(0), c(0), k(0), end(0), f(0) {};

and it will initialize the data members.

So it is enough to write

rsa () {}

or

rsa () = default;
  • For reference, can you provide a link to the section you got this from? Thanks. – Daniel May 11 '14 at 21:50
  • @VladfromMoscow So, whenever an object of a derived class is created, the constructor of the base class is called, but it doesn't initialize that object variables unless it is explicitly specified in the constructor of the derived class! So, why the constructor of the base class is called if it doesn't initialize the derived class variables unless it explicitly stated? – Mohamed Ahmed May 11 '14 at 21:59
  • @Mohamed Ahmed You are wrong. Your constructor of the base class explicitly initializes data members that specified in the mem-initializer. There is no any need to specify it in the mem-initializer of the constructor of the derived class because it will be called in any case. – Vlad from Moscow May 11 '14 at 22:02
  • 1
    @Mohamed Ahmed Yes, you may. I showed this in my post. – Vlad from Moscow May 11 '14 at 22:05
  • 1
    @MohamedAhmed Yes, you can simply leave the derived class constructors empty. In fact, if they are empty, they are not needed at all. I've updated my answer to include all of this. – Daniel May 11 '14 at 22:05
1

It should be private_key() : rsa() {};

  • You're technically correct, however you should elaborate a bit on your answer a bit :-) – Karl Nicoll May 11 '14 at 21:55
  • I wanted to but after page refresh i saw others responses so there is no need to duplicate. I'd delete my answer if I could. – kaman May 11 '14 at 21:58
  • You actually can delete your own answer by clicking the link at the bottom of the post, just before the comments start. In this case you don't need to since your answer is technically correct, it's just lacking an explanation. As long as your answer is not wrong or misleading, there is no need to delete it. – Daniel May 11 '14 at 22:03

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