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I do not know to properly call this, here is what I do in Python 2.7:

>>> "6C 7C 8C 9C TC".split()
['6C', '7C', '8C', '9C', 'TC']

>>> cards = "6C 7C 8C 9C TC".split()

>>> [r for r, s in cards]
['6', '7', '8', '9', 'T']

If I use Ruby:

>"6C 7C 8C 9C TC".split
=> ["6C", "7C", "8C", "9C", "TC"]

> cards = "6C 7C 8C 9C TC".split

> ????????????

My question lies in the ???????????? part. Thanks

  • 1
    Why dont you try it in irb? – Santhosh May 12 '14 at 12:33
  • I remembered now. Thanks – Juanito Fatas May 12 '14 at 12:35
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How about this ?

2.1.0 :014 > s = "6C 7C 8C 9C TC"
 => "6C 7C 8C 9C TC" 
2.1.0 :015 > s.scan(/\w(?=\w+)/)
 => ["6", "7", "8", "9", "T"] 
2.1.0 :016 > 

Note : Regex can be improved as per the need. But this is an idea, which can be used I think.

  • What if we need to turn "T" to 10? Then we have to modify the regexp, so I prefer to use the block form of collect and map, when I need to do more things, I could change in the block. Thanks for showing the scan usage! – Juanito Fatas May 12 '14 at 12:47
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Use collect or map:

cards.collect { |c| c[0] }
cards.collect(&:chop)

cards.map { |c| c[0] }
cards.map(&:chop)
  • You could use cards.map(&:chop) to get the first character, though. – Buck Doyle May 12 '14 at 12:40

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