2

I have developed a program for Windows 7 and it runs on my computer as it should (in release mode). However, when I copy and paste the project folder to my external HDD and try it on a different computer, it 'runs' but nothing really shows up. I will try to post relevant code:

class App : Application
{
    [STAThread()]
    static void Main()
    {
        new App();
    }
    /// <summary>
    /// Starts application with splash screen
    /// </summary>
    public App()
    {
        StartupUri = new System.Uri("SplashScreen.xaml", UriKind.Relative);
        Run();
    }
}

Even though this screen is never visible, my MessageBox is shown.

//constructor
    public SplashScreen()
    {
        //generated method
        InitializeComponent();
        System.Windows.MessageBox.Show("WHY ME??");
         mw = new MainWindow();
         mw.Show();
    }

After the splash screen, the main window should open, but it doesn't AND this MessageBox never shows up.

 public MainWindow()
    {
        //Windows generated
        InitializeComponent();
        System.Windows.MessageBox.Show("WHY ME??");
    }

As I mentioned, the program runs as it is supposed to in both release and debug mode, but then when I bring it to another computer it only shows "WHY ME??" once instead of twice like it should. Any ideas?

  • Is the program still running in the task manager? If not you probably have an error. Dependency or path error – Mark Hall May 13 '14 at 0:24
  • 1
    Try to check windows event logs(win+R -> eventvwr -> Windows Logs -> Application). Usually when app crashes like in your case - crash info should be there. – alex.b May 13 '14 at 0:38
  • What is the other machine you're moving the code to? Are they both x64? What configuration are you building under? Do you have external references? – John Bowen May 13 '14 at 1:02
  • 1
    You should also add logs to your startup code, and a big old ugly try/catch block around your mw.Show(). – Miiite May 13 '14 at 6:57
2

Turns out there was a lot wrong with my code. One of the largest problems I had was hard-coded file paths to the computer it was running on. However, what really helped me with all computer-migration related problems was adding the following code to each class:

In Constructor:

 AppDomain.CurrentDomain.UnhandledException += CurrentDomain_UnhandledException;

Create handling function:

   void CurrentDomain_UnhandledException(object sender, UnhandledExceptionEventArgs e)
    {
        System.Windows.MessageBox.Show(e.ExceptionObject.ToString());
    }

It is slow and tetious however it does a pretty good job of assisting in locating source of problems. So there was multiple things wrong with my program, but adding the above code helped solve a lot of issues.

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