114

I understand that in JavaScript you can write:

if (A && B) { do something }

But how do I implement an OR such as:

if (A OR B) { do something }
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  • 2
    This is by the way not jQuery specific. It's just a Javascript library. Your question is Javascript specific. – BalusC Mar 2 '10 at 14:41
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    @BalusC they're virtually synonymous these days :P – Dolbz Mar 2 '10 at 14:47
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    @Dolbz pfooo disagree!! :P – web-stars May 15 '18 at 18:15
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    @web-stars a lot has changed since 2010 :) – Dolbz May 17 '18 at 9:08
  • @Dolbz mmm, oops... :P And I still know nothing since 2010. – web-stars May 17 '18 at 19:51

11 Answers 11

250

Simply use the logical "OR" operator, that is ||.

if (A || B)
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85

Worth noting that || will also return true if BOTH A and B are true.

In JavaScript, if you're looking for A or B, but not both, you'll need to do something similar to:

if( (A && !B) || (B && !A) ) { ... }
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  • Shouldn't be first phrase be "Worth noting that || will return true if EITHER var A OR var B is true" ?? It implies what you mentioned is (true | true) = true. which is common and understood. – Punith Raj Jan 23 '15 at 7:44
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    (A && !B) || (B && !A) can be replaced with A ^ B which is much smoother – user2039981 Oct 28 '15 at 14:31
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    @Murplyx: In most cases yes, but numbers outside the 32 bit range can fail. (Math.pow(2,32)-1) ^ 0; // -1 (success) ... Math.pow(2,32) ^ 0; // 0 (failure) – user1106925 May 12 '16 at 0:44
  • if (A ? !B : B) {... would be a shorter substitute that wouldn't have the 32-bit limitation. Or maybe if (!A != !B) {... – user1106925 May 12 '16 at 0:52
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    @squint Why would a true or false ever be outside of the 32 bit range hence they are only 0 or 1, and btw if you compare numbers just use !!n to get the boolean value. – user2039981 May 26 '16 at 17:17
15

Use the || operator.

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13
if (A || B) { do something }
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11

|| is the or operator.

if(A || B){ do something }
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8

here is my example:

if(userAnswer==="Yes"||"yes"||"YeS"){
 console.log("Too Bad!");   
}

This says that if the answer is Yes yes or YeS than the same thing will happen

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  • 1
    Does your answer improve upon any existing answer? It's a specific use case? – emecas Dec 30 '14 at 21:03
  • Is it work? I code like that but it's syntax error. I code like this. if (name === 'Jam' || name === 'Jem' || name == 'Jum') – Penguin Jun 4 '15 at 6:17
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    Yes, I discovered the hard way that you have to include each statement separately. I worked out that if (number === 1||2||3) is like while (true); the second and third conditions ask if 2 is 2 and/or 3 is 3. They always resolve as true to the statement always passes. There goes my plan to reduce the character count. Keeping the statements in parenthesis does make it easier to read though. – TimSmith-Aardwolf Jul 13 '15 at 15:03
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    Just much better to use .toLowerCase() instead of having to check all different case variants. – AquaAlex Sep 18 '15 at 15:51
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    var choice = prompt("Do you choose rock, paper or scissors?").toLowerCase(); if (userChoice != ("paper"||"rock"||"scissors")) { console.log("Invalid Choice made"); } – AquaAlex Sep 18 '15 at 15:53
1

One can use regular expressions, too:

var thingToTest = "B";
if (/A|B/.test(thingToTest)) alert("Do something!")

Here's an example of regular expressions in general:

var myString = "This is my search subject"
if (/my/.test(myString)) alert("Do something here!")

This will look for "my" within the variable "myString". You can substitute a string directly in place of the "myString" variable.

As an added bonus you can add the case insensitive "i" and the global "g" to the search as well.

var myString = "This is my search subject"
if (/my/ig.test(myString)) alert("Do something here");

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  • Interesting. Documentation? – Ken Sharp Jun 12 '19 at 6:05
0

More then one condition statement is needed to use OR(||) operator in if conditions and notation is ||.

if(condition || condition){ 
   some stuff
}
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  • 1
    Why are you answering old questions with exactly the same answer? – Ken Sharp Jun 12 '19 at 6:05
0

You can use Like

if(condition1 || condition2 || condition3 || ..........)
{       
     enter code here
}
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  • 1
    Why are you answering old questions with exactly the same answer? – Ken Sharp Jun 12 '19 at 6:05
0

If we're going to mention regular expressions, we might as well mention the switch statement.

var expr = 'Papayas';
switch (expr) {
  case 'Oranges':
    console.log('Oranges are $0.59 a pound.');
    break;
  case 'Mangoes':
  case 'Papayas': // Mangoes or papayas
    console.log('Mangoes and papayas are $2.79 a pound.');
    // expected output: "Mangoes and papayas are $2.79 a pound."
    break;
  default:
    console.log('Sorry, we are out of ' + expr + '.');
}

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-1

Just use ||

if (A || B) { your action here }

Note: with string and number. It's more complicated.

Check this for deep understading:

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  • 7
    This question has been answered four years ago. Does your answer improve upon any existing answer? – Frambot Jun 27 '14 at 16:04
  • @JoeFrambach: No. I just wanna make a clearer answer :) – haotang Jun 28 '14 at 12:35

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